Strange Weather by Joe Hill

Book – Full disclosure, I suffer from attention deficit disorder so I’m always on the lookout for books that I’m actually able to finish from start to finish. I had little issue with this collection of short novellas.Cover image for Strange Weather

In Strange Weather, Hill presents a collection of four odd stories of varied length that entertain and disturb. In “Snapshot,” a young boy faces his nightmares, the menace of dementia, the challenge that is the tattooed Phoenician, and a thug armed with a Polaroid camera. “Loaded,” is an extremely relevant story with the capacity to emotionally tear you apart. “Aloft,” moves us into more supernatural territory, as Aubrey Griffin’s finds himself landing on a weird cloud in the sky. “Rain,” is a dystopian, post-apocalyptic imagining with a terrifying and killer rain that penetrates skin. Hill’s collection will please readers who are looking for a sampling of introspective horror.

If you’re looking for even more creepy books by Joe Hill check out Heart-Shaped Box and NOS4A2. Hill’s titles are available in print, audiobook, eAudiobook, eBook on Hoopla and Overdrive.

Fresh Ink: An Anthology edited by Lamar Giles

Books – Twelve authors. Twelve diverse stories. As editor Lamar Giles, cofounder of We Need Diverse Books wrote, “In these pages are all sorts of heroes.” From a one-act play about gun violence by Walter Dean Myers, a first-love story by Newbery Medal winner Jason Reynolds, a graphic story by cartoonist Gene Luen Yang, to a superhero story by Nicola Yoon, there is something for everyone here.

This book is part of We Need Diverse Books’ mission to ensure that young people find authentic stories that resonate with their lives and experiences. This book is for people who identify as minority–whether in race or sexual identity or popularity–to find positive representations of themselves. It is also a book for readers who want to try to gain a better understanding of the perspectives and experiences of others.

There are love stories. Some of the stories offer social commentary. Some may hold your attention; others may not. I found the collection very readable, but if I’m being honest, I did skip one story because the genre didn’t interest me. Months later, several of the characters stick with me. I highly recommend young adults and adults check out this collection.

Binge Read on a Library Kindle

Join the trend of binge reading and find a new favorite author, character or genre! Our Summer Reading Challenge is the perfect time to binge read with one of our fully-loaded Kindle e-reader devices available to Warrenville Library members. You can read on a Kindle anywhere you’d read a book—the kitchen, backyard, beach or library! In just a few hours you can crank out a book, and within a few evenings or a weekend you might even be able to read an entire series.

Check out the Mystery Kindle to have all of Louise Penny’s Armand Gamache series at your fingertips, or the Science Fiction & Fantasy Kindle to catch up on the Expanse series. Kids can enjoy the first thirty volumes of the Magic Tree House series on the Elementary School Battle of the Books Kindle.

Our Kindles come with easy-to-follow instructions and charging cables. Find all the themed Kindles we offer in our catalog.

Every book you read on a Kindle between now and July 31st counts toward our Summer Reading Challenge. Log each title on a reading log. The more logs you complete, the more entries you earn for our gift card drawings. For more information on our challenge and to download reading logs, visit warrenville.com.

For more information on our Kindle devices, stop by or call our Member Services Desk at 630/393-1171.

The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling

Book – Gyre is determined to get off the mining planet she grew up on and to find her mother, who disappeared years ago. The easiest way to do that is as a caver, exploring the depths of the planet to find new sites for the mining companies that run the world. But caving is dangerous, so rather than take the time to build up a proper career and risk dying before she gets a chance to get out, Gyre’s faked her CV and signed on to one big job that should pay her enough to get offworld as soon as she’s done. Of course, there’s a reason this job pays so much, and it’s certainly not because it’s a normal caving expedition.

I never expected a novel about one person alone in a cave, sometimes talking with one person on the surface but sometimes not, to be so emotional. Gyre is a terrific character, stubborn and foolhardy and paranoid, and I was cheering her on even as I was cursing her terrible decisions. While the novel starts out almost like a horror novel, the deeper Gyre goes into the mystery of why she’s been sent into this particular cave and what happened there, the more the broader universe of mining corporations and alien predators – not to mention Gyre’s developing relationship with her handler, the woman who hired her for this expedition – comes into play. I adored The Luminous Dead and I can’t wait to see what Caitlin Starling does next.

Vox by Christina Dalcher

Front CoverBook – At first glance, Vox‘s cover appears simplistic and unassuming – but this, dear reader, we would be wrong to presume.

Vox takes place in contemporary America and follows Dr. Jean McCellan, an acclaimed scientist and feminist. She, along with all women, must adhere to a strictly-enforced 100-word per day government decree or suffer punitive electric shocks if she goes over the allotment. In no small part due to the “Pure Movement,” women are not permitted to work outside of the home, nor girls taught to read or write. The author’s readable prose presents us with a thriller into which we are intimately drawn and a world which Dalcher deftly navigates.

Good Morning America lists Vox as one of their “Best books to bring to the beach this summer.” Wow…how shall I put this, uh – no. While Vox is significantly less voluminous than Margaret Atwood’s hefty The Handmaid’s Tale and is provocative and worthwhile reading on Fall, Spring, or Winter day, but one for a hot, forgettable, summer’s day? Not on your life.

 

Legion (2017)

TV Series – David Haller knows what his problem is. He has schizophrenia. He’s doing much better in the institution, but it’s a pretty boring life, until Sydney shows up. She doesn’t like to be touched, doesn’t like people getting to close to her at all. Soon she and David fall in love. But on the day Sydney leaves the institution, something explosive and incomprehensible happens — something that makes it clear that David’s problem isn’t schizophrenia, it’s that he’s a mutant with superpowers, and he’s going to have to learn to control them before someone else does it for him.

Legion is a terrifically artistic TV show based on a character from the X-Men comics. While it’s produced by Marvel Studios and connected to the current X-Men movie franchise, you don’t have to have seen anything else to understand it — the characters are probably more confused than you are. The first couple of episodes use a very non-linear structure to put you in David’s head: it takes a long time to figure out when now is and exactly what that means. But it’s a terrific ride getting there, and unlike some shows that pay more attention to their aesthetics than their story, it’s never frustrating or too hard to follow. Legion packs a lot of story into an eight-episode season, and it’s tremendously binge-worthy.

Season Two of Legion just finished airing on FX this summer, and the show has already been renewed for a third season.

The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells

Books – A rogue SecUnit is one of the most terrifying things imaginable: a part-living, mostly-machine entity designed for security applications, without a working governor module, free to kill and destroy at will, and unstoppable by human agency.

The narrator of All Systems Red is technically a rogue SecUnit. It hacked its governor module, but instead of going on a murderous rampage, mostly it keeps doing its job and watches media in its downtime. (It particularly enjoys Sanctuary Moon.) That is, until a neighboring science mission goes dark and the humans SecUnit has been assigned to protect are threatened. SecUnit (who also calls itself Murderbot, although never out loud) doesn’t particularly like interacting with humans, but it doesn’t want them to die. After all, if all the humans died, who would make the media?

The Murderbot Diaries are short science-fiction thrillers, full of corporate espionage and underhanded dealings, but the real joy of them is watching Murderbot try to figure out how to be a person – because despite its continued insistence that it’s a bot, it’s one of the most intensely relateable characters I’ve ever met. (After all, who doesn’t want to spend long, boring shifts at work watching TV?) It struggles with human interaction, interactions with other bots, and how to handle personal responsibility, all while staying far enough under the radar to avoid being captured and reprogrammed. Artificial Condition follows Murderbot’s attempt to understand it’s own past (and its reluctant friendship with a science research transport). The series continues with Rogue Protocol in August and Exit Strategy in October.

Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Book – Living on an illegal mining colony in the middle of nowhere makes for a pretty boring life. Until, that is, a fleet of ships from BeiTech Industries show up out of nowhere and start blowing everything up. Seventeen-year-old Kady is one of the survivors, picked up by the science vessel Hypatia, and her recently-ex-boyfriend Ezra has been conscripted aboard the warship Alexander. But the Alexander‘s artificial intelligence was damaged in the battle with BeiTech, and it’s getting a little trigger-happy. Meanwhile, a disease is spreading through the fleet, one with disastrous consequences. Frustrated with the lies and misinformation being spread by the fleet’s commanders, Kady starts hacking into the ships’ networks, trying to find the truth, and she winds up much deeper in the intrigue than she ever expected to be.

Illuminae is an intense, cinematic science fiction novel that’s got a little bit of everything: spaceships! Explosions! Corporate intrigue! Romance! Plague zombies! I love a good epistolary novel, and this one is killer. The variety of document types allows for great character-building dialogue and action sequences both, and also builds in some great opportunities for unreliable narrators (of which there are plenty). I loved the relationship between Kady and Ezra; it’s not often in a YA novel that the love interests already have an established relationship, and it was a nice change from the more common will-they-won’t-they romance. If you like this, you’ll also enjoy the Expanse series (both the novels and TV show) by James S.A. Corey, another science fiction series that subscribes to the Rule of Awesome.

Version Control by Dexter Palmer

Book–Set in the near future, Palmer’s novel follows Rebecca Wright, a thirty-something recovering alcoholic, and her physicist husband Philip. Philip has been working fruitlessly for many years on a causal volatility device (in layman’s terms, a time machine), and as far as he knows, has not been having much luck. Meanwhile, Rebecca has been having a nagging sense that something is not right; the president is not the right person, her friends’ personalities aren’t quite right, her life isn’t what it should be. Palmer has an interesting take on time travel that, without spoiling anything, powers much of the narrative. For me, the attraction of this book was the depiction of the near-future society, where the president delivers personalized messages to each citizen and cars drive themselves.

While the main character is not, in my opinion, likeable, she is very real and flawed. Palmer’s views on race, gender, marriage, and technology are very much on display here and, regardless of whether you agree with them, they are certainly interesting to read about and only occasionally preachy. Version Control is a perfect sci-fi and literary fiction blend sure to appeal to fans of Atwood’s Oryx and Crake and Mary Doria Russell’s The Sparrow.

Ghost Summer by Tananarive Due

Book – Tananarive Due is the hidden secret of modern horror fiction. Sick of sparkly vampires? Bored with ghosts? Tired of the same old gothic secrets and bloody horrors and frankly offended by the level of sexual assault? You need to be reading Tananarive Due. One of the luminaries of the Afrofuturism movement (speculative fiction with a focus on Africa and the African diaspora), Due’s characters are gut-wrenchingly real, and her stories, even when horrific, are mesmerizing.

Take, for instance, “The Knowing,” the story of a ten-year-old boy and his mother who knows the date everyone she meets will die. Or “Free Jim’s Mine,” a classic deal-with-the-devil story told from the point of view of a relative, rather than the one who makes the deal, who is trying to escape via the Underground Railroad. Or the title story, “Ghost Summer,” an award-winning novella that expertly brings together backyard ghosts and the ghosts of history and family, all from the viewpoint of young ghost hunter Davie Stephens, who just wanted to be YouTube-famous and got way more than he bargained for. Even readers who aren’t big horror fans would enjoy her work, I think – it’s not graphic, but powerfully emotional, in sometimes heartbreaking but always insightful ways.