Create a lifelong reader with Picture Books!

Reading picture books with your children instills a love of the written word, expands vocabulary and awakens the imagination. Picture books feature interesting, colorful characters and great illustrations that sweep kids away to far off lands or even under the sea. The stories are full of twists and turns that help develop deductive reasoning skills. Share picture books at bedtime, family time or even playtime with your toddlers and young children. Think about all of the memories you’ll make just by reading to your children.

To help you foster a love of reading in your children, we are offering Picture Book Bundles! Each bundle consists of 10 picture books selected by a librarian in our Youth Services Department especially for your child. Here’s how you can conveniently get a Picture Book Bundle:

  1. You select themes from our list of picture book categories.
  2. Email the themes you would like for your child to: youthservices@warrenville.com. Include your first and last name and the last 6 digits of your library card number so we can check out the books for you.
  3. When your Picture Book Bundle is ready, we’ll contact you to pick it up either at the Youth Services Desk or through our Curbside service at Stafford Place, whichever you prefer.

This service is available for WPLD cardholders. Need a library card? Contact our Member Services Desk at 630/393-1171 x100 or go to Get a Library Card.

If you have any questions about our Picture Book Bundles, please contact Diana Abraham, Youth Services Librarian, at 630/393-1171 x113 or diana@warrenville.com.

 

Do-It-Yourself Storytimes

Do your kids miss listening to books, learning new rhymes, and singing and dancing at Library storytimes? Our Do-It-Yourself Storytimes are the perfect way for parents to help their young children dream themselves into another place in the universe, go on adventures and learn a few new things about the world all from the comfort of home.

  Our DIY Storytimes include themed reading and listening resources from Hoopla, OverDrive, Tumblebooks and other online sites so that the fun and learning can go on, even while our building is closed. The best part for parents? You can share these stories with your kids at a time that’s convenient to you and at your own pace. You can also pick and choose what elements to include based on your child’s interests and comprehension levels.

Here is a list of DIY Storytimes with links to their resources:

Miss Diana’s Toddler Time
Snuggle Up
Rabbits
Art
Dragons
Poetry
Earth Care
Jungle Fun Storytime and Rhyme Time
Under the Sea Storytime and Rhyme Time

More DIY Storytimes are listed under Programs On Demand at warrenville.com. 

If you have any questions, please contact our Youth Services Desk at 630/393-1171 x124 or youthservices@warrenville.com. 

Favorite Children’s and Young Adult Books of 2019

Books – The weather outside is frightful, but reading a new book over winter break can be delightful!  Here are some of my favorite Children’s and Young Adult books published in 2019.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman (YA Fiction)

I don’t usually read much science fiction, but this space-based story caught my attention right away with its compelling characters and adventurous plotline.

Because of the Rabbit by Cynthia Lord (Juvenile Fiction)

A shorter chapter book about the impacts of true friendship–even the friendship of a rabbit!

The Big Book of Monsters by Hal Johnson (Juvenile Non-Fiction)

For fans of the scariest of creatures.

Cheshire Crossing by Andy Weir (YA Graphic Novel)

I am a huge fan of fractured fairy tales, so this book was right up my alley!  What happens when Alice, Dorothy and Wendy meet and their fantasy worlds collide?

Daniel’s Good Day by Micha Archer (Picture Book)

Daniel explores what makes a “good day” for the people around him.

Dear Justice League by Michael Northrup (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

Even superheroes are not perfect.

Sparkly New Friends by Heather Burnell (Beginning Reader)

A unicorn and a yeti become best friends who both love sparkly things.  What is not to love?

The Line Tender by Kate Allen (Juvenile Fiction)

This beautiful, unique story of grief and connection to nature’s mysteries had me sobbing.

Strange Birds by Celia C. Pérez (Juvenile Fiction)

Four unlikely friends team up to protest a revered feathered hat connected to town history.  A story of friendship, civic engagement, and bird facts!

Stargazing by Jen Wang (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

For fans of Raina Telgemeier’s books.

They Called Us Enemy by George Takei (YA Non-Fiction Graphic Novel)

A powerful and important account of Japanese internment camps during World War 2.

 

 

 

Ideas Are All Around by Philip Stead

indexBook – The narrator of Ideas Are All Around–unnamed, but presumably author Stead himself–doesn’t feel like writing a book today.  Neither does his dog, Wednesday, so the two of them go for a walk instead, meeting old friends and taking in familiar sights with new eyes.

Not all picture books are written with children as their primary audiences.  Not that I think kids wouldn’t enjoy or benefit from Ideas Are All Around–I just expect that adults will like it even more. Caldecott Medal-winner Stead’s book reads like a down-to-earth zen koan, a quiet meditation on place, community and the small, everyday moments that make up a life.  That might sound pretentious in a picture book, but the solid imagery, the polaroid-style illustrations and the clear, simple language keep Ideas Are All Around grounded and real.  While the stream-of-consciousness format would quickly wear out its welcome in a novel, it suits perfectly for this 32-page wisp of story, which leaves a lovely sense of peace in its wake.

In addition to being a great choice to share with family, I would absolutely recommend this book for adult fans of poetry or literary fiction who are willing to step just a little outside of their comfort zones and give the children’s section a peek.