NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman

Book – Odd and unusual behaviors do not in and of themselves constitute a disorder unless they are related to a manifestation or, to a series of dysfunctions within an individual.  Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs one’s ability to communicate and interact with others.  This is often characterized by restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, intellectual deficits, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. Those with Autism can vary highly in their symptoms.  Current diagnostic material now includes Asperger’s, PDD-NOS, and Childhood Disintegration Disorder, which were at one time utilized apart from one another.

NeuroTribes is a must-read for anyone in the field of education neuropsychology. The book dives into the developmental history of our understanding of Autism and its implications for those living with the condition, their families, researchers, and the media.  Growing up alongside a family member on the spectrum of Autism and working with children who have special needs, NeuroTribes gave me significant insight into the drastic changes differential diagnoses and treatment of those with disabilities, has made over the decades.

Few would argue that a parent’s sole responsibility is to care for one’s child. Desperate to affect the course of a child’s plight, we need not wonder why parents of children with Autism unceasingly seek out answers to the behaviors associated with Autism & are willing to try new therapies, diets, and approaches — all in the hope of finding a cure.

Attempting various alternatives to give children with Autism the best possible interventions available, parents and aides alike will find comfort in knowing that efforts in helping loved one manage daily hardships, is an undertaking which numerous people share. Neurodiversity is not wrong, simply – different. Although countless difficulties abound in the lives of those with Autism, we can and should, embrace the way in which persons with Autism think and perceive the world.

NeuroTribes is also available on Hoopla and Overdrive.

NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman

Book – Autism spectrum disorders exploded into the public consciousness in the early 2000s, along with worries that this sudden uptick in diagnoses meant that something unnatural was happening to children, something that had never been seen before. Really, Silberman explains, with great and gracious detail, our understanding of what “normal” development looks like and how eccentricity shades into disability is changing. In this book, he follows the history of autism and the researchers, parents, and people with autism who shaped our understanding of the different ways the human brains can work.

This isn’t a nice history; people have, historically speaking, not been nice to other people who have disabilities or even just differences that make them annoying. And since Hans Asperger and Leo Kanner, who shaped our modern understanding of autism, were physicians working in Austria and Germany in the mid-twentieth century, eugenics and genocide play a large role in early chapters. It gets better after the Nazis, but that’s not a very high bar to clear. The way people diagnosed with autism have been treated under the guise of helping them to become “normal” is upsetting at best. And yet, I found this a very hopeful book. Despite the burying of Asperger’s research; despite the litany of abuse and mistreatment; despite the struggles autistic people still face in being understood, accepted, and listened to; Silberman paints a picture of a flourishing subsection of humanity, one with astounding gifts and a great uniqueness, one which is ready, in this age of technology, to come into its own.