Hoopla Audiobooks

HooplaAudiobook-I started listening to audiobooks on Hoopla since I became a member of the Warrenville Public Library District in 2014. Since we are all at home staying safe during the Covid-19 pandemic, I am listening to my favorite genre romance almost daily. It is easy enough to use headphones when my husband needs quiet for business calls, but materials on Hoopla can also be streamed thru Amazon devices, such as the Firestick or Echo. I found myself watching far too much when the quarantine began and now, I listen in while coloring, painting, woodworking, on walks, relaxing on the deck, or cooking dinner. Hoopla is a great way to get entertainment hands-free; not be stuck to the couch for days on end, and makes it easy to search for your special interest. There is something for everyone. I stick to romances, which is what makes this gal tick.

I recently listened to the Cascadia Wolves, and the Diablo Lake, series by Lauren Dane. Both of the adult-content series include:  magic, werewolves, witches, big cats, alpha men, and romance. If you have little people, consider using headphones while listening.

That Boy by Jillian Dodd is family-friendly, happy, fun romance series of a girl and her neighbor growing up together. The stories reminded me of when I first met my husband.

Materials on Hoopla are available with your Warrenville Public Library Card 24/7!

Fresh Ink: An Anthology edited by Lamar Giles

Books – Twelve authors. Twelve diverse stories. As editor Lamar Giles, cofounder of We Need Diverse Books wrote, “In these pages are all sorts of heroes.” From a one-act play about gun violence by Walter Dean Myers, a first-love story by Newbery Medal winner Jason Reynolds, a graphic story by cartoonist Gene Luen Yang, to a superhero story by Nicola Yoon, there is something for everyone here.

This book is part of We Need Diverse Books’ mission to ensure that young people find authentic stories that resonate with their lives and experiences. This book is for people who identify as minority–whether in race or sexual identity or popularity–to find positive representations of themselves. It is also a book for readers who want to try to gain a better understanding of the perspectives and experiences of others.

There are love stories. Some of the stories offer social commentary. Some may hold your attention; others may not. I found the collection very readable, but if I’m being honest, I did skip one story because the genre didn’t interest me. Months later, several of the characters stick with me. I highly recommend young adults and adults check out this collection.

The Flatshare by Beth O’Leary

BookThe Flatshare by Beth O’Leary is one of my new favorite romance novels and an endearing love story! For fans of cutesy, sweet Cover image for The flatshareand awkward romances, this is the book for you! Tiffy is reeling from a bad breakup and has no where else to turn. She needs somewhere to stay, anywhere, cheap and fast!  Against her best friends’ judgement, she responds to an ad to share a flat with a stranger she’s never met–a guy named Leon.  With completely opposite work schedules, it seemed likely they’d never meet face to face. So, sharing the same bed would never be an issue, or so they think. Then a passive aggressive post it note on cleanliness soon develops into a budding friendship.

This is a unique love story with more twists and turns than I anticipated. Tiffy is a bright ball of energy, while Leon is more cold and distant. It’s a slow romance with plenty of awkward encounters and hilarity ensuing around every corner. I enjoyed learning about each of the main characters and past lives, woven throughout the story. Their hardships served to bring them closer together. A heartwarming story of opposites attract, Tiffy and Leon come together as friends and eventually something more.

The Christmas Card (2006)

DVD –  In the middle of a war in Afghanistan, Master Sargent Cody Cullen receives a Christmas card thru a random act of kindness and never leaves his side. Cody is drawn to the cover art (a picture from Nevada City, California) and the message. He considers the card a symbol of good luck to stay with him throughout the war. Once he is back in the USA, he decides to find the woman who wrote the magical card.

Faith’s long time, distant, Wall Street boyfriend Paul, out of the blue asks her to marry him. Who does she end up with, and what can a retired military officer give her, a corporate guy can’t?

The Christmas Card is one of my favorite Christmas movies! Though predictable to a degree there is enormous, deep passion between everyone. Also, it engages me to think about what life might be like for a man coming home from war. Definitely a warm and fuzzy holiday movie!

Shot on Gold by Jaci Burton

Book- Will, a hockey player thru and thru and loves his life as one. This will be his second year at the winter games for Team USA.  At his first games, Will played, and partied, too hard. This year, however, he wants to take a step back to be in the moment.

Amber, a figure skater thru and thru, is attending the winter games for a third, and final, time. Although she is 26-years-old, she is considered past the “prime” age of competitors.  Nevertheless, she worked on a new routine and honed her skills for 4 years.  Amber has stood on the medal stand, but this year she is going for gold and nothing will get in her way. Always the good girl, she rarely left her room unless it was to practice. This year, Amber wants to do it all! Can she party, find a man to help her let loose, and win the gold?

I adore this series and like most of the other books, this one is likewise amazing. Author Jaci Burton does a fantastic job of detailing life in Olympic Village. I was drawn into the story and felt like I was experiencing life alongside Amber and Will. Of course, this is a romance novel, so the ever-looming question prevalent in most romance novels is,
“Will they stay together forever or was it just a fling?”  I thought of at least a dozen endings to this story, but Burton went above and beyond in her storytelling, tying things up with a little bow on top of the whole package.

This is the 14th book in the Play by Play series. We have several of the books in our library holdings.  Most of the titles are available on Hoopla.

A Line in the Dark by Malinda Lo

Book–Amateur comic book artist and high school student Jess Wong is painfully, unhealthily in love with her best friend Angie. Jess is content to obsess over Angie secretly until Angie enters into a relationship with Margot Adams, a beautiful student from the nearby posh boarding school. Naturally, Jess thinks Margot is no good for Angie, but is this just sour grapes on Jess’s part or is Margot really bad news? When tragedy strikes at an off-campus party and everyone is a suspect, Jess must face up to what really happened that night. Or must she?

This is a dark, twisty thriller, like Pretty Little Liars meets Gone Girl meets The L Word. The book is split in two parts: the beginning is told in first person from Jess’ POV and the end is made up of police interviews and third person limited POV following multiple characters. This allows Lo to build up the tension without giving it all away too quickly. If you enjoy A Line in the Dark, you might also like twisty young adult books like We Were Liars and Last Seen Leaving.

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue by Mackenzi Lee

Book–Henry “Monty” Montague, bisexual teenager and soon-to-be British lord, is a drunk disappointment to his abusive father. His last hurrah before descending into the doldrums of running the estate at his father’s side is his grand tour, the trip around the European continent that many young male aristocrats take to shore up overseas alliances and soak up some culture. Monty is not interested in alliances or culture; he’s interested in (read: has a massive crush on) his traveling companion, his biracial best friend Percy, and in getting drunk and laid as much as possible. Monty’s tour gets hijacked by his father sending along his sharp-tongued little sister Felicity and, even worse, a chaperone to keep Monty on a strict itinerary. However, when Monty swipes a MacGuffin from one of his father’s allies and highwaymen ransack their carriage to get it back, their tour takes a sharp turn toward adventure, complete with alchemy, pirates, and even true love.

The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue is so darn much fun. Monty, Percy, and Felicity are all such well-drawn characters with great dialog and relationships with each other. While each of the characters has some darkness and secrets in them, the overall tone is optimistic. If I had any complaint about this book, it’s that it felt too modern. Monty’s coolness with his bisexuality (and conception of it as such) among other things seems anachronistic and is not entirely explained away by the Author’s Note at the end. If you enjoy this one, you might also like the Doctrine of Labyrinths series by Sarah Monette for a darker, more complex take on an adventuring and queer romance story or Simon Vs. The Homo Sapiens Agenda if you were into it for the character dynamics and romance, but not the adventure.

Noteworthy by Riley Redgate

Book— At scholarship student Jordan Sun’s elite, arts-focused boarding high school, getting cast in the school musical isn’t just a fun diversion–it’s a make-or-break-your-career proposition. After she gets passed over for the musical the third year running, Jordan gets some hard advice. For an alto 2 like Jordan, the deepest register for female voices, there just are not many parts, leading or otherwise, in musical theater. Shortly after, Jordan hears that there is an open spot in the Sharpshooters, the most prestigious a capella octet on campus, and decides to audition. The only catch? The Sharpshooters is an all-male group. Can alto 2 Jordan be just the tenor the Sharpshooters need?

Redgate’s characters, especially the Sharpshooters, are a diverse, tight-knit bunch and it’s a pleasure to see Jordan become a member of their little family. I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to enjoy this story because I know next to nothing about music and even less about a capella, but I needn’t have worried. Noteworthy should appeal equally to music neophytes and music buffs. If you like realistic, well-drawn characters, high school stories with a dash of romance, and stories exploring gender, you’ll definitely want to read this book. If you enjoy this one, you might also enjoy the manga series Ouran High School Host Club, which has a fairly similar premise (girl cross-dresses and gets in with a popular club of boys at a prestigious school) but a sillier tone.

I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo

Book–High school senior Desi Lee likes to have her life under control. With perfect SAT scores, high school popularity, and a great relationship with her goofy, Korean-drama-obsessed widower dad, Desi’s drive and methodical determination have gotten her almost everything she wants in life. The only thing she’s missing is a boyfriend. When she feels an instant connection with impossibly cool and handsome new student Luca Drakos, she decides to apply her scholarly single-mindedness to the project of snagging Luca. Using her father’s Korean drama formulaic romances as a template, she devises a step-by-step plan to win Luca over. Staged near-death experiences and contrived K-drama hijinks ensue.

I had mixed feelings about this book; Desi’s plans cause real harm to real (well, fictional-real) people and she is upfront about how bonkers her plans get. I found that this book was immensely fun if I didn’t take it too seriously, sort of like Korean dramas themselves, in fact. Desi is a charming, strong-willed protagonist with an out-of-whack moral compass who, without spoiling anything, gets off a bit too easy for some of the dangerous stunts she pulls. If you enjoy I Believe in a Thing Called Love, I recommend books by Jenny Han and Sarah Dessen.

A Princess for Christmas (2011)

DVD- Jules Daley is laid off her job as an antique sales person. She is also the legal guardian for her young niece and nephew. With Christmas just around the corner, her outlook on making the best of things is quickly dwindling. Paisley, the butler for the kids distant grandfather, has arrived and invited the whole family to the castle for the holidays. Edward, the grandfather, is not pleased to see these “outsiders” in his home and creates a cold and distant atmosphere. Ashton, Edward’s only surviving son and Prince of Castleberry is intrigued with the new arrivals, but is also stiff and cold.

Jules starts to settle into castle life etiquette and makes a few changes for the sake of the holidays, but mostly for Milo and Maggie. Instead of having staff decorate the Christmas tree, she decides to do it herself. Though Edward takes a while to warm up, he eventually comes around and starts to remember what Christmas is really about. At Castleberry’s annual Christmas Ball Jules overhears a conversation that prompts her into action. Will she and Ashton get to explore a budding relationship, or will he lose her and himself along the way?

A Princess for Christmas is one of the best “Hallmark” Christmas films. It might be a bit on the sappy love story side for the men folk, but it has lots of love, laughs, and is heartwarming for everyone.