Favorite Children’s and Young Adult Books of 2019

Books – The weather outside is frightful, but reading a new book over winter break can be delightful!  Here are some of my favorite Children’s and Young Adult books published in 2019.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman (YA Fiction)

I don’t usually read much science fiction, but this space-based story caught my attention right away with its compelling characters and adventurous plotline.

Because of the Rabbit by Cynthia Lord (Juvenile Fiction)

A shorter chapter book about the impacts of true friendship–even the friendship of a rabbit!

The Big Book of Monsters by Hal Johnson (Juvenile Non-Fiction)

For fans of the scariest of creatures.

Cheshire Crossing by Andy Weir (YA Graphic Novel)

I am a huge fan of fractured fairy tales, so this book was right up my alley!  What happens when Alice, Dorothy and Wendy meet and their fantasy worlds collide?

Daniel’s Good Day by Micha Archer (Picture Book)

Daniel explores what makes a “good day” for the people around him.

Dear Justice League by Michael Northrup (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

Even superheroes are not perfect.

Sparkly New Friends by Heather Burnell (Beginning Reader)

A unicorn and a yeti become best friends who both love sparkly things.  What is not to love?

The Line Tender by Kate Allen (Juvenile Fiction)

This beautiful, unique story of grief and connection to nature’s mysteries had me sobbing.

Strange Birds by Celia C. Pérez (Juvenile Fiction)

Four unlikely friends team up to protest a revered feathered hat connected to town history.  A story of friendship, civic engagement, and bird facts!

Stargazing by Jen Wang (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

For fans of Raina Telgemeier’s books.

They Called Us Enemy by George Takei (YA Non-Fiction Graphic Novel)

A powerful and important account of Japanese internment camps during World War 2.

 

 

 

Short by Holly Goldberg Sloan

Book – Writing is both a craft and an art.  With enough practice, most writers can produce a well-constructed and enjoyable book, but only a sparse few have that other thing–call it a voice, or originality, or authenticity, or heart.  It’s really hard to describe why a Holly Goldberg Sloan book is an occasion and a joy.  She’s just got that touch of art that makes a story special.

Counting by 7s was Sloan’s breakout hit among both child and adult readers, and justifiably so; it’s beyond gorgeous.  Short, her newest book, has some definite similarities, including a young female protagonist growing up through the story, inter-generational friendships, and grief and healing as themes.  But overall it’s a lighter, breezier, more comforting read.  Like Raina Telgemeier’s smash-hit graphic novel for the same audience, Drama, Short centers on a young Theater Kid finding confidence and belonging through a new production.  In this case, the show is The Wizard of Oz, and eleven-year-old Julia, who used to be bothered by her (lack of) height, suddenly finds that it’s her ticket to the spotlight–she’s the only kid her age small enough to land a part as a Munchkin.  An average student and middle child, Julia finds that the production lets her connect with and earn the approval of adults in a way she’s never experienced before, and gives her a safe window into a more complicated, grown-up world.

Short is a quiet book, wonderfully written and touching.  Definitely hand it to any tweens in your life.  And when they’re done, borrow it back from them to have a look for yourself.

Ideas Are All Around by Philip Stead

indexBook – The narrator of Ideas Are All Around–unnamed, but presumably author Stead himself–doesn’t feel like writing a book today.  Neither does his dog, Wednesday, so the two of them go for a walk instead, meeting old friends and taking in familiar sights with new eyes.

Not all picture books are written with children as their primary audiences.  Not that I think kids wouldn’t enjoy or benefit from Ideas Are All Around–I just expect that adults will like it even more. Caldecott Medal-winner Stead’s book reads like a down-to-earth zen koan, a quiet meditation on place, community and the small, everyday moments that make up a life.  That might sound pretentious in a picture book, but the solid imagery, the polaroid-style illustrations and the clear, simple language keep Ideas Are All Around grounded and real.  While the stream-of-consciousness format would quickly wear out its welcome in a novel, it suits perfectly for this 32-page wisp of story, which leaves a lovely sense of peace in its wake.

In addition to being a great choice to share with family, I would absolutely recommend this book for adult fans of poetry or literary fiction who are willing to step just a little outside of their comfort zones and give the children’s section a peek.