What Book Changed Your Life?

Can you remember a book that changed your life? Perhaps you read something that gave you hope or answered a burning question. Maybe you related to a quirky character or a memorable setting. Or at some point in your life you got lost in a book that simply spoke to you in a way you can’t describe.

Prior to the onset of this worldwide crisis we all find ourselves in, we asked our library visitors to tell us what book changed their lives. This list might look a little different in a few months when people tell us what they’ve read during periods of self-isolation, but for now here is our list of books that changed someone’s life. It includes Youth, Teen and Adult content. The title under the book image links to our catalog. Many of these books are available for free digital download through the OverDrive or Hoopla apps.

If you search our catalog and your only option for a title is to place a hold for a digital download, you will need to establish an account on the app in order to be notified when your “hold” becomes available. For help getting started on Hoopla or OverDrive, visit eBooks & eMedia.

We hope you find a book that changes your life, too!

Once our library reopens and we resume full services, you will be able to place a hold on a book to pick up or request something from our interlibrary loan system.

A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms by George R.R. Martin

BookGame of Thrones is off the air again (the season seven finale hasn’t aired at time of writing, so I can say without fear of spoilers that I just bet it was spectacular) and The Winds of Winter still has no release date. What’s a Song of Ice and Fire fan to do?

In my extremely informal survey of Martin fans, I’ve found that even among heavy readers who’ve enjoyed the five books of the main Song of Ice and Fire series, few have taken the relatively brief (~350 page) foray into the prequel world of the Dunk and Egg.  That’s a crying shame. Planned for an eventual series of about nine, the first three Dunk and Egg novellas, collected under the title A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms, are an absolute treat of a read. That said, they are very different to the main series, featuring none of the same characters and, more importantly, a significant tonal shift. Where the main Westeros novels espouse an almost noir-ishly grim, nice-guys-finish-last-and-without-their-heads morality, the stories of lowborn Ser Duncan the Tall and his squire–the boy who will someday become King Aegon the Unlikely–have an absolutely opposite feel, old-fashioned in a good way. Here, 100 years before Game of Thrones, chivalry and innocence are still very much alive and well. Ser Duncan is far from pampered, and certainly the stories see their share of moral complexity and bad things happening to good people, but ultimately kindness, generosity, honor and compassion are allowed to win the day.

A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms is as page-turningly compelling as A Song of Ice and Fire, but with a brisker pace, a narrower scope, and, as aforementioned, a welcome optimistic tone. For any reader–even one new to Martin’s work–who needs a charming, well-written break from death and destruction (whether on the news or HBO), it’s a fantastic choice.