Beast by Brie Spangler

Book--Ever since the 6th grade, Dylan has been larger than other boys. Now at over 6 ft. tall, improbably hairy, and still growing, 15-year-old Dylan (called Beast by his peers) hides his face under hats and feels trapped in a body that doesn’t match his insides. When his school bans hats, Dylan walks off the edge of the school building and breaks his leg. He claims it was an accident. His orthopedist and his mother don’t agree. They send him to counseling for teenagers with self-harming tendencies, where he meets Jamie. Jamie is beautiful, smart, and funny, just the kind of girl that would impress Dylan’s friends. Because this is a Beauty and the Beast retelling, Dylan starts to shed some of his shallowness and misogyny as he falls in love with her, and begins to let go of his anger at the world. However, when Dylan learns that Jamie is transgender (a fact that she told him when they first met, had he been listening), he freaks out and pulls away from her. Will Dylan be able to get over his knee-jerk transphobia and apologize to Jamie? Will she be able to forgive him? Will they get back together?

Of course they will. But reading about how is the whole fun of it. I really enjoyed reading about Dylan’s journey from crass and callow teenage boy to sensitive young man. Despite being a fairy tale retelling, Beast stands on its own. If you enjoy this one, you may also enjoy other LBGT classic story retellings aimed at young adults (yes, this is a whole genre) such as Ash by Malinda Lo (retells Cinderella), Great by Sara Benincasa (retells The Great Gatsby), and As I Descended (retells Macbeth).

The Glass House (2001)

DVD – Ruby and Rhett are teenage siblings whose parents tragically die in an automobile accident. Long time family friends, the Glasses, become their new guardians. The Glasses live in a huge house that comes across as more of an art museum in Malibu. Initially they have to share a bedroom, which is not right for a 16 year old girl and an 11 year old little brother. Ruby notes that something is not right with her new guardians and tries to rely on her parents executor of the estate who claims to be trustworthy. The Glasses somehow seem to pass all the “tests” of guardianship just in time for the state to do a “routine” inspection. As the movie develops, we learn that Mr. Glass is in deep financial trouble with bookies, and Mrs. Glass seems to have turned herself from medical doctor to drug junkie. How will the kids get out of this situation and what does their future hold?

I thought this movie was great on many levels. The actors were superb choices for the characters. There are a few small plot holes, but nothing you cant overlook and use your imagination. This is definitely a thriller movie, and not a “boo” kind of horror movie. I loved that it is an slightly older movie set back in 2000, so the trip down memory lane with VHS and *69 phone calls, and listening in on landline calls was funny to me. It was great to see how Ruby and Rhett maneuvered through this whole horrible situation and thinking about what other options I would have used.  I definitely recommend this one for a suspense horror movie night!

Love and First Sight by Josh Sundquist

Book – Josh Sundquist is a spunky motivational speaker and Paralympian. He lost his left leg to cancer at nine years old, and often pulls from his daily experiences dealing with his disability. Sundquist is a hilarious speaker and writer; I definitely recommend checking out some of his performances. He has also composed two memoirs, and Love and First Sight is his first novel.

In Love and First Sight, we meet sixteen-year-old Will Porter. Will is blind, and he is starting high school at a hearing school.  His first day does not go well; he manages to grope a classmate, make a girl cry hysterically, and sits on somebody in the lunchroom. But then he meets quiet, sweet Cecily who he quickly develops a crush on. When Will learns that a new type of medical operation could potentially return his sight, he is overwhelmed with the excitement of seeing the world for the first time. However, Will never anticipated the challenges he would face with the miracle of sight. Things are not quite what he expected, especially when it comes to Cecily. While Will’s friends described Cecily’s appearance to him when he was blind, Will finds that the girl he’s fallen so hard for doesn’t meet the typical standards of beauty. Though he knows it shouldn’t matter what she looks like, Will feels betrayed, and is unprepared for all the changes his newfound sight has brought to him. A coming of age story of young love, life-changing decisions and friendship.

For more fiction stories dealing with blindness, check out: Love Blind by Christa Desir, and Things Not Seen* by Andrew Clements (*Followed by Things Hoped For, and Things That Are. All three books of the trilogy are available on our pre-loaded Middle School Battle of the Books Kindle.)

Modern Children’s Classics to (Re)Visit Soon

Books – Revisiting childhood favorites may be the definition of comfort reading.  Some children’s books inspire a ‘what was I thinking?’ response when revisited later in life, but some have enough depth to genuinely repay a fresh, or first, look from a grown-up perspective.  The following are four children’s classics which I find myself rereading often–not just for nostalgia, but because their messages still resonate and they still make me think even as an adult.  (They’re all from the mid-20th century, because I needed some limit or this list would be five miles long).  It goes without saying that they’re still great choices for today’s kids, too!

From the Mixed-Up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler by E.L. Konigsburg

Twelve-year-old Claudia Kincaid has a stiflingly samey middle-class upbringing and an indefatigable independent streak.  Accompanied by her younger brother Jamie, mostly because she needs the financial security of his scrupulously hoarded allowances, Claudia runs away from home to an astonishing destination: The Metropolitan Museum of Art.  The description of Claudia and Jamie’s escapades in the Museum will never fail to be delightful, but re-reading now, what sticks with me is the depth of the story’s messages about emotional resilience and how life’s challenges teach us who we are.

The Westing Game by Ellen Raskin

I think it’s a disservice to this fantastic mystery to call it a children’s book–and I say that despite thinking that children’s books are for everyone, and despite the fact that it’s a beloved Newbery winner.  The mystery at its core is deliciously twisty, but what’s striking about this story is the size and breadth of its beautifully-drawn cast.  You could cut out the mystery element entirely and still have a fascinating story about strong personalities thrown together through the simple circumstance of apartment living, not unlike Alexander McCall Smith’s 44 Scotland Street series for adults.

The Phantom Tollbooth by Norton Juster

I may be one of the two people in the world who loves the movie version of The Phantom Tollbooth, but I still really wish it had been better, because the book deserves the universal fame of better-adapted works like The Wizard of Oz.  All the classic portal fantasy elements are there: Milo receives a mysterious package in the mail and is drawn through it into a whimsical nonsense world that needs his help.  The Phantom Tollbooth is, sort of, a traditional good-versus-evil story, but it stands out because it’s actually less about outright wickedness and more about the perils of inaction: boredom, not heroism, sets Milo off on his adventure, and instead of moustache-twirling villains he faces enemies like the “Terrible Trivium”, the ultimate waster of time. Juster’s is a deeper, more complex, more contemporary and relevant kind of morality than usual in children’s fantasy, one that could easily be marketed as ‘fractured’ fairy tale were it not so full of genuine heart.

The Giver by Lois Lowry

If The Hunger Games is YA lit’s answer to 1984, then The Giver is its Brave New World.  I’m as much of a Katniss fan as the next Youth Services librarian, but The Giver did YA dystopia long before, and arguably better.  It’s a profoundly political story about every citizen’s complicity in government actions and the high price we pay for a life without discomfort, and it’s as touching, as painful and as thought-provoking now as ever.

 

 

 

The Summer I Turned Pretty by Jenny Han

Book- According to Belly, summer is the only time of the year that counts. Every summer she goes to Cousins Beach leaving her school life alone. She starts out as a young and annoying little sister to Stephen. At the beach house they are also with her moms best friend for life and her two boys Conrad and Jeremiah.  She was left out of all the cool things, like camping on the beach, going to a party down the beach, going to the pier with the boys. She was always feeling left out.

She is absolutely in love with and chasing after Conrad. He does little things to show her he notices her and cares for her, but then he follows that up with being distant and harsh with her. Finally this summer, she thinks its the summer to change everything. She is allowed to go to the party down the beach and meets a new guy named Cam. He is a little different, but she likes different. She is not sure how much she can like him, as her heart always belongs to Conrad. Then there is Jeremiah, her best friend at the beach, who occasionally shares a secret lust look with her.

I enjoyed this book. This is the first in a trilogy (all of which I have read), and I think Jenny Han sets up the background story well. I did get a little annoyed with Belly, the main character, as she is a little over dramatic at times. I suppose that’s why this is considered a young adult romance novel. It was a nice easy read where the plot line isn’t far-fetched or complicated. It reminded me of the way I used to see things at her age. Man, I am excited to actually be an adult!

As I Descended by Robin Talley

imagesBook–Roommates (and secret couple) Maria and Lily are students at the elite boarding school Acheron Academy. The girls excel at academics, extra-curricular activities, and popularity contests, especially Maria. The only problem, from their perspective, is that they are not the very best. Fellow student Delilah Dufrey holds this honor: she is valedictorian, captain of their soccer team, and a shoo-in for homecoming queen. Delilah is also at the top of the list to win the coveted Cawdor Kingsley prize, a full college ride and two years of free grad school to the winner. While none of the girls actually need the money, they all crave the status, and Maria wants to ensure that she gets into Stanford with Lily.

To ensure the prize goes to Maria and to stay together, Lily is willing to do anything, even exploit Maria’s belief in ghosts and the supernatural to convince her that getting the prize is foreordained. What follows is a a full-on, ghost-laden, Shakespearean tragedy that neither girl could have predicted where bad decisions pile on top of each other and lies beget more lies. Like The Tragedy of Macbeth that it’s based on, As I Descended is an exploration of the lengths that the desire for power can drive people to.

American Street by Ibi Zoboi

Book – Although high schooler Fabiola Toussaint grew up in Haiti, she is an American citizen.  Her mother is not.  They’ve both been planning to come and live with family in Detroit, but when Customs and Immigration stop her mother at the airport, Fabiola finds herself flying alone to a strange city in a strange country to live with an aunt and three cousins she knows only over the phone.

It’s a rough dunking in the deep end of adulthood, and Fabiola’s three cousins, while loving and supportive in their own way, don’t always make her transition easier.  Tough and street-smart, they have a neighborhood rep as the Three Bees–Brains for the eldest, Chantal, and Beauty and Brawn respectively for twins Donna and Pri.  Nor does Aunt Jo, partially paralyzed from a stroke and often bedridden with pain, play much of a role in welcoming Fabiola to Detroit.

Bit by bit, Fabiola feels her way through assimilation to a new culture and a new family.  Her cousins’ fierceness soon translates to an equally powerful protectiveness and love.  Donna’s abusive, drug-dealing boyfriend is a blot on all their lives, but Fabiola is drawn to his sweet friend Kasim.  A police officer offers Fabiola a chance to help her mother through the immigration process, for a price.  And Fabiola can never feel too disconnected from her roots as the daughter of a Vodou mambo when Papa Legba spends his nights on the sidewalk across from her new home, singing cryptic riddles under the streetlights at the corner of American and Joy…

American Street is a powerful, original and deeply relevant first novel from a talented writer.  Anyone who objects to profanity would do best to steer clear, but for other adult and older teen readers this is a strongly recommended exploration of the present-day American experience.

Matched By Ally Condie

Book- What if society was perfect? No pollution, no dieses, everybody was just as equal as their neighbor, sounds great…right? Somewhere in the near future we accomplish this, the perfect society. After generations of working on eradicating all inequality in every single aspect of life a new form of government rises. Now known as The Society.

This is the story of Cassia Reyes, a seventeen year old girl who’s dream of a perfect life was to live in The Societies rules, be matched at the age of seventeen, get her final work position and live a long and happy life until her Farewell Ceremony. But all this changes when she is looking over her card from her Match Banquet, instead of seeing her best friend Xander Carrow’s face, for a brief second she see’s someone she recognizes…Ky Markham the other boy who lives down the street. After seeing this image for only the briefest of moments she knows only one thing, Ky was meant to be hers. A mistake by the otherwise perfect Society gives her the one thing she would never have thought she would have, a chance to choose. A story full of surprising twists and turns, the reader follows the story of Cassia Reyes and her road to societal freedom.

Matched by Ally Condie is a wonderful book about love, loss, and the power to choose your own destiny. While the book could get a little hard to follow at times it was very fun to read and it kept me guessing until the very end.

 

My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories edited by Stephanie Perkins

51N8TdfrZ6L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Book–Looking for a light, frothy read over the holidays? My True Love Gave to Me is the collection for you. Including stories from some of the biggest authors in the young adult literature world, these stories will appeal equally to young adults and adults looking for a clean read. I enjoyed all of the stories in this collection, but some of my favorites were “Midnights” by Rainbow Rowell, where we follow two best friends over a series of New Years Eves until they fall in love, “Your Temporary Santa” by David Levithan, where the main character’s boyfriend dresses up as Santa to surprise the main character’s sibling, and ” Angels in the Snow” by Matthew De La Pena, about a lonely young man who is stuck cat-sitting far away from his family over Christmas. This collection spans genres from realistic fiction to fantasy, so there should be a story here for everyone.

If  you enjoyed this collection, you’ll be pleased to know that there is also a version to entertain you this summer: Summer Days and Summer Nights, also edited by Perkins, brings 12 more stories by twelve different authors with a similar seasonal theme. Not only that, but if you really liked any of the stories, consider checking out the authors’ novels!  We have plenty of them here at the Library.

The Boy in the Black Suit by Jason Reynolds

boy-in-the-black-suit-9781442459502_lgBook–Matt’s world collapsed the day his mother lost her battle with cancer. And now he is losing his father to the bottle. Nothing is the same anymore. He suddenly feels older than all of his friends and nobody seems to understand what he is going through. When Mr. Ray offers him a job working with him at the funeral home, Matt’s first reaction is to say no. He really did not want to be surrounded by death, it would just remind him of what he lost.

But when Matt realizes that he has two options: work at the Cluck Bucket or work for Mr. Ray, he takes Mr. Ray’s offer. And he is surprised at how cathartic it was to watch another person struggle with their pain. Now, Matt cannot wait for another funeral. He even wears his black suit everyday so he is prepared for work. Then he meets Lovey, who has also dealt with pain and loss, and he begins to realize that maybe he is not actually alone in the world.

The Boy in the Black Suit is a great book about dealing with the loss of a loved one and learning to overcome your trials. It is beautifully written with diverse and funny characters. I recommend it to anyone who enjoys reading realistic fiction.