The Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin

fifth seasonBook – The world is coming to an end but Essun’s world ended three days ago, when she came home to find that her husband had beaten their three-year-old son to death when he discovered the boy was an orogene, one who has a supernatural power over the shaking of the earth. An orogene girl is picked up by a Guardian to be taken somewhere she can learn to use her powers, rather than be lynched by her community. Syenite, a young trained orogene, travels to a coastal city to fulfill more than one assignment given to her by her mysterious handlers. These three stories converge in fascinating and unexpected ways through N.K. Jemisin’s new series debut, The Fifth Season.

Some people might be put off by Essun’s part of the story, which is told in second person, the narrator speaking to “you” who is also Essun. I’ve definitely read poorly done second-person stories, but this is not one of them: in Jemisin’s careful hands, these sections are full of raw, immediate emotion. After a couple of pages I forgot about the pronouns and fell into Essun’s life and world completely.

This is a rough book, to be sure. All of the main characters are of a despised magic-using minority, and Jemisin writes painfully well about the bigotry and oppression they suffer. But they’re all strong, powerful, compelling characters, and to watch them refuse to be cowed by the experience is wonderful. It also features some of the best fantasy worldbuilding I’ve ever seen, with a fully-developed world with thousands of years of history so very different from our own but so believable as well. Jemisin’s already racked up a number of awards for her Dreamblood and Inheritance series, and she’s bound to pick up some more for this one.

Pompeii by Robert Harris

Book Pompeii– This historical thriller will keep you turning pages in anticipation of the eruption of Mt. Vesuvius.  Set on the island of Pompeii in 79 A.D, hydraulic engineer Marcus Attilius is summoned to repair the aqueduct system that supplies fresh water to the residents.  Attilius discovers a blockage that threatens to deprive a large area of the empire of water, but he is also troubled by the strange environmental occurrences that may be an indication of an impending natural disaster on a massive scale. He falls in love with Corelia who supplies him with proof that something sinister is afoot on Pompeii.   As he races against the clock to make repairs, his angst increases and he is hindered by corrupt violent officials from warning the inhabitants of impending and unstoppable disaster. Will Marcus get off the island with Corelia before the volcano blows its top? This novel is well researched with rich historical details transporting us to this ancient world.