A Late Quartet

Late quartetMovie – A Late Quartet features no special effects, criminal kingpins, drug abuse or physical violence; instead, it offers a thoughtful, character-driven, cerebral psychodrama. The movie focuses on a string quartet – called The Fugue – that has played together for 25 years, but is shaken when the cellist and oldest member decides he must retire when he learns that he has Parkinson’s Disease. Hidden resentments, affairs and multiple conflicts begin to surface. The plot shines light on the relationship between life and art. Life is the thing from which art comes: bloody, incoherent, embarrassing, arbitrary and cruel. Art is an idealized vision of life, with the power to bestow order on chaos. Plays and novels have explored this, but A Late Quartet does it effortlessly. Christopher Walken, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener and Mark Ivanir deliver great performances as the musicans who choose playing in quartet over solo careers. The movie uses Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, opus 131, as a metaphor for playing on through all of life’s ambiguity, pain and irony. I also appreciated the movie’s message about not being overly concerned with mistakes in playing the music, but rather to convey strong lyrical phrases.