The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

lost symbolBook – Towards the beginning of Dan Brown’s third book featuring Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, Langdon points out that fewer students in his class have visited their own nation’s capital than have traveled abroad. In The Lost Symbol Brown wraps the buildings, monuments, and leaders of this nation in the intriguing style of clandestine history with which he previously enlivened the locales of Paris and Rome. At the request of a close friend and mentor, Langdon is called to Washington D.C. to present a lecture. However, his arrival at the U.S. Capitol Building begins a race to save his mentor’s life. During the thrilling chase and unraveling of codes meant to protect sacred metaphysical truths, and intertwining revelations of noetic science, readers are treated to a captivating underground tour of Washington. As in the movie National Treasure a large part of this story’s success is the authentic impression of historical embellishments. Here are several texts to help distinguish fact from fiction before embarking on a trip inspired by The Lost Symbol: Secret societies of America’s elite : from the Knights Templar to Skull and BonesThe Truth About Masons, Secret Societies and How They Affect Our Lives Today, Secret Societies: Gardiner’s Forbidden Knowledge, The Washington Monument : it stands for all, America’s library : the story of the Library of Congress, 1800-2000The City of Washington, an Illustrated History. I listened to The Lost Symbol with the Library’s updated Overdrive app, which has convenient controls for listening at advanced speeds and for setting a timer.

 

Provence 1970 by Luke Barr

provenceBook – This book, which is drawn from the letters and diaries of twentieth century gourmet personalities, may have you raiding your fridge as you read, due to the mouth-watering descriptions of tasty meals throughout. These personalities include writers as well as chefs such as Julia Child, Richard Olney, and James Beard. However, the focal point of this text is the food writer M.F.K. Fisher, whose revealing journals inspired her great-nephew, an editor of Travel & Leisure, to author this book. His narrative focuses on a wintry period in 1970 when his great-aunt, a columnist for the New Yorker, was traveling in France, meeting up with her fellow food connoisseurs for communal dinners in Provence, and searching for nostalgic French cuisine on her own. Intimate and not always charitable thoughts of how these characters truly viewed each other are revealed, based upon a wealth of their correspondence. The author points to this time as a turning-point, when the titans of American tastes began to question the romanticized ideal of the superiority of French cuisine.

Tapestry of Fortunes by Elizabeth Berg

tapestry of fortunesBook - Elizabeth Berg’s latest release is a quick, heartwarming read that is full of honest introspection on life, death, and friendship, which fans of Berg have come to expect. After the death of a close friend, Cecilia Ross allows herself to be guided by a Tarot card reading, and makes a dramatic change by selling her home and moving into a charming old house in St. Paul where she bonds with three female roommates of differing ages. Witty dialogue enriches the story as these restless women decide to take a road trip together, each with a particular destiny they wish to fulfill on the road. Cecilia is looking for Dennis Halsinger, the man she never got over, who recently sent her a postcard out of the blue. I alternated between reading the print copy of this title, and listening to the sound recording. The recording is narrated by Barbara Caruso who possesses a mature voice that emphasizes the retrospective segments of this novel in which Cecilia looks back on her life and the relationships that shaped her. For another amusing read on the topic of traveling women, try Sand in My Bra and Other Misadventures: Funny Women Write From the Road. Contributors to these humorous tales include Ellen Degeneres, edited by Jennifer Leo.