All the Time in the World: A Book of Hours by Jessica Kerwin Jenkins

timeBook – Books of Hours are the most common book we have from medieval history – beautiful, elaborate manuscripts created for one (very wealthy) person, providing them with a list of holidays throughout the year and prayers throughout the day. Inspired by this format, Jenkins has created a kind of uber-trivia book, a collection of small historical stories and interesting bits of information that match up with the hours of the day and the months of the year.

The cherry-blossom festivals of Japan, duelists who dreaded getting up in the morning more than the upcoming duel, writers’ personal schedules and national holidays, recipes and recommendations (including a recipe for Nostradamus’s aphrodesiac jam, and a recommendation not to try it), historical snapshots of Renaissance Florence, 1930s Shanghai, and desserts that you set on fire before serving – this book has a little bit of everything. More in-depth than a usual trivia book, but without a wholly defining theme, other than the passage of time, I found this perfectly wonderful for curling up on a rainy day with a cup of tea.

Gates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. Lee

gates of threadBook – Gates of Thread and Stone is the first book in a series by Lori M. Lee.

Kai is different, she lives with Reev, her ‘brother’ that has kept her safe and alive in a world that is littered with dangerous people and ideas. In this world only one person is allowed magic. So Kai has to hide her ability to twist the threads of time. With Reev’s help, this hasn’t been a problem, until people start going missing and Reev is one of them. Now desperate to find him she has to trust the shopkeeper’s son, Avan, and a slew of people that do not have her best interests at heart.

I don’t often do this, but I gave this book a 5-star rating on Amazon and Goodreads. This was a fantastic balance of dystopia, magic, brutality, romance, and familial strife. I loved this book and am even more excited that I can share it with my teen daughter. There is romance in the book, but it doesn’t tip into what I feel is inappropriate for my young daughter to be reading about. The first in a planned trilogy, Gates of Thread and Stone is a must read.