Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb

Book – I was excited for the recent release of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist & Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb and am happy to report that the book exceeded my expectations.

Lori explores her personal experiences from the point of view of as therapist and patient. The concept of therapists seeking therapy for themselves was one I had never before considered. This prompted me to question how we, as a society view therapists.  Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is insightful, deep, thought-provoking and shows therapists in a different light. At the base we are all human beings, but as a people who pay others to provide a service, she demonstrates a unique lens in which to view therapists. Lori also shares stories about the work she did with patients, which includes humorous narration when describing her true feelings of an especially difficult patient. I find the therapist-patient relationship particularly fascinating and enjoyed reading all of the experiences Lori had to share.

She begins the book leading up to a devastatingly unexpected breakup, which ultimately leads her to seek out a therapist when she hits the breaking point. The order of events are easy to follow, as she switched between the present and past narratives.  Learning about her career path and the events that ultimately led her to become a therapist, is a journey of seeking and discovery we may all relate to. Her story on this is enlightening. Lori is a relatable author and readers will find at least one aspect to connect with in Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.

 

All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker

all-is-not-forgottenBook – Twelve-year-old Jenny Kramer was the victim of rape, a brutal, and violent assault, but she has no memory of the attack. That’s because Jenny’s parents made the decision to have doctors give Jenny a controversial new drug meant to erase all memory of the attack.  This novel deals with the aftermath of that decision, and Wendy Walker weaves in the effect that Jenny’s attack has on her parents, Charlotte and Tom Kramer, Inspector Parsons, and the mysterious unreliable narrator. I felt that Wendy Walker managed to introduce and delve into the backstories for countless characters without bogging the story down. If anything it made the story even richer.

I also loved the unreliable narrator and his place within the story. When I say I love the narrator, I mean how the character is written, the depth in which we are able to delve into who he is and his involvement in the story of Jenny Kramer. He is at times likable, other times despised, but I feel that all readers can at least agree that he elicits a strong reaction and has a unique existence within the book.

This is a dark and disturbing, yet completely immersing read that had me still pondering over it hours are reading.  I would warn potential readers that the description and details of Jenny’s rape are extremely graphic; it is a difficult read.