Three Wishes by Liane Moriarty

Book – Approaching their thirty-third birthdays, the Kettle sisters Lyn, Cat, and Gemma reminisce about the chaotic past year.  Including pregnancy, a love affair, a mid-life crisis, and the possible reconciliation of their divorced parents. Three Wishes tells the zany story of the triplets – two identical, one fraternal, who celebrate each year with their own cake and candle(s), thus they each make a wish.

What starts out as a festive evening ends up in a chaotic brawl in a restaurant in Sydney.  The beginning will have you hooked, since you will want to know why the pregnant sister has a fondue fork sticking out of her belly.

Lyn who has it all together and is very organized begins having debilitating panic attacks.  Cat thinks she has the perfect marriage until her husband announces that he is having an affair with a younger woman. Gemma tends to have short term relationships with men and her jobs have even a briefer duration.  If she wasn’t a house sitter, then she would probably be homeless.

This is Moriarty’s first novel and it is a candid look at a trio that has an unshakeable bond that is as wonderful as it is frustrating.  Funny, sincere, and wise with a touch of sibling rivalry – this is an enjoyable read.  Netflix has plans to make this a series.

47 Meters Down (2017)

Movie – As someone who’s claustrophobic and terrified of drowning, this movie made me tense.  However, I always love a good shark film. In 47 Meters Down, we meet Lisa and Kate, two best friends on holiday in Mexico. Lisa just broke up with her cheating boyfriend and they’re hoping to escape it all.  Then two handsome gents invite the friends to go cage diving with the sharks, promising the experience of a lifetime. From the get go, things seem a little shady, but Lisa and Kate know this is a one time opportunity. The red flags are there every step of the way, yet as in any creature feature/sharky shark film, all logic must be ignored.

I enjoyed all the scenes featuring our great white friends, though there weren’t nearly enough, in my opinion. The psychological aspect of the film was unexpected and added yet another layer of uncomfortable tension, but was really well done.

The whole situation is terrifying to me: a limited air supply with a very real risk of getting the bends swimming to safety. Swim to the surface too fast, and the pressure increase will be too much for your body to handle. Definitely not a good predicament to find yourself in when there are sharks circling hungrily nearby. This definitely solidified my desire to never tank dive–not that I was so determined to do so anyway. A good film, not enough sharks.  There really are never enough sharks.

For another shark escape adventure, check out The Shallows, with actress Blake Lively.

 

The Mirror Sisters by V. C. Andrews

29430815Book – From the author of Flowers in the Attic, comes a new disturbing tale of twins, appropriately titled The Mirror Sisters by V.C. Andrews.

I should have known what to expect from this creepy, chilling novel centered on identical twins, Haylee Blossom Fitzgerald and Kaylee Blossom Fitzgerald.  With a manic and controlling mother, the sisters received a truly identical upbringing, and were taught to view themselves as a single perfect being.

As children, their mother ensured that each twin received exactly the same treatment and experiences.  If one twin received a new dress, the other must also have an exact duplicate.  Likewise, if one child happened to cut her finger on a broken shard of glass, the other must be pricked in the exact same spot of the exact same finger.  Differences in behavior and thought were frowned upon and punishable.  Though centered on the relationship between the two girls, I enjoyed that this story also had a strong focus on all relationships within the Fitzgerald family.  The obsessed mother.  A troubled father.  It was cool to see those unique family dynamics.

The story as a whole left me frustrated, and stayed with me long after reading.  I applaud V.C. Andrews for composing a complexly disturbed narrative I simply couldn’t put down.  Definitely not a feel good story in any respect, but well worth the read.

 

The Forest (2016)

9149Movie–Identical twin sisters Sara and Jess have always been very close, brought together by their parents’ death when they were children. Sara is nothing but supportive when Jess, who has struggled with suicidal thoughts in the past, decides to go teach English in Japan to get a fresh start. Sara is stunned, though, when she receives  a call from Japanese authorities that her sister is missing and was last seen entering Aokigahara Forest at the base of Mount Fuji. Aokigahara Forest, as the characters in the movie love telling Sara in as spooky a manner as possible, is a popular destination for those contemplating suicide and is full of yuurei, vengeful Japanese spirits that try to get you to stray from the forest path and give you hallucinations to prompt dark thoughts. Naturally, Sara decides to plunge right into the forest to find Jess, whom Sara is sure has not yet succumbed to yuurei. Accompanied by a guide and a new acquaintance, Sara is making headway towards finding Jess when she makes the predictably terrible, horror-movie-protagonist decision to stay in the forest overnight.

This movie excels in its first two thirds at building suspense. It has a lot of well-composed shots that will stick in my memory and makes the audience care about Jess’ fate through Sara’s eyes. However, as is often the case with horror movies, the last third is a bit of a muddle. The protagonist makes a series of seriously poor decisions and the money shots of vengeful yuurei are a bit too direct and silly-looking to inspire real terror. The unique setting and great first two-thirds, however, are enough to make the movie worth a watch.

 

The Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs

appleBookThe Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs is a highly entertaining light read great to take along to the beach or enjoy while traveling. Tess is an expert at antiques and returning lost treasures to their rightful owners. She is career driven, has a fast-paced life in San Francisco, and is on the verge of being promoted. She has no real family ties; her mother travels extensively and she never knew her father. Tess’ life is about to dramatically change when a handsome banker named Dominic shows up and gives her the news that she has a grandfather, who is hospitalized, and a half-sister, Isabel. Tess also finds out that if her grandfather does not pull through, she and  Isabel are heirs to a vast apple orchard in Sonoma Valley. Tess joins her new found family on the estate, learns about her roots and she and Isabel uncover some family secrets, including family involvement in the Danish resistance against the Nazis. While the sisters acquaint themselves with each other Isabel cooks and bakes – her passion. Some recipes are included. Highly recommended for fans of women’s fiction, this book is just the right combination of family, romance, secrets and a little mystery.  This is the first book in the Bella Vista Chronicles series.  I look forward to reading the second – The Beekeeper’s Ball.

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

tell the wolvesBook – I truly enjoyed revisiting numerous forgotten details about the 1980’s with the teenage protagonist of this novel. It begins as fourteen-year-old June is losing her only friend,  her uncle Finn, to the then little-known illness AIDS. While it begins with a story of loss it transforms into a narrative about a quirky and intriguing friendship when June meets someone else Finn has left behind. This novel also paints a sensitive and believable picture of the complexity of family relationships, especially the relationships between siblings. The story kept me interested as secrets that were withheld from June, as well as the knowledge that comes with aging, transformed her perception of the world and of her understanding of the lives of those around her. The audiobook is read by Amy Rubinate. Her calm, youthful, but never saccharine, tone is pleasant and appropriate for the main character. Print and digital copies of this title are also available from the library.