The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn

Book – After a chance meeting brought them together, Lucy and Owen fell in love.  Raised on the chaos of city life, the couple left New York City in favor of the quiet family-centered Hudson Valley, a small suburb of Beekman.  It’s a health-centered place where you know all your neighbors, and the local moms cook up hot lunch at the schools.  Over the years, the romance and attraction in Lucy and Owen’s relationship has fizzled, as they concentrate on raising their young autistic son, and dealing with the chaos of daily life.

It is on a rare drunken night with friends that the idea first hits them.  Their friends reveal they have begun an open marriage, which shocks Lucy and Owen. As the weekend passes by, however, Lucy and Owen just can’t shake this new knowledge.  Is it really as crazy as it sounds?  In the spur of the moment, they lay out the groundwork and compile a set of strict rules.  They agree on six months, no questions asked, but neither one has any idea how much their lives are about to change

The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn was not at all what I expected.  The story follows the relationship of Lucy and Owen, but it also blends in multiple other points of view, looking into a variety of marriages and relationships outside of the main couple. While one obviously expects there to be sexual content when reading about open marriages, I actually found the details to be pretty minimal, with more concentration on the changing family dynamic of Lucy, Owen and their son, as well as other relationship in the story.  I enjoyed this read because it felt very real, like something unfabricated, a glimpse into the life of someone who might actually exist.

 

Eleanor Oliphant Is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman

Book – Eleanor Oliphant is an awkward young woman who doesn’t have any friends. She works as an administrator in a design firm and spends her weekends drinking enough vodka so that she is neither drunk nor sober. Her only contact with people outside of work are shopkeepers, utility men and weekly phone conversations with her institutionalized mother. Then, Eleanor wins a set of tickets to a concert and develops a crush on one of the singers. Eleanor decides she must improve herself to win his love and changes (and hilarity) ensue. Eleanor’s observations about people’s habits and pop culture and her attitude about life are entertaining, but also also give a glimpse of what she has endured. I loved reading about Eleanor’s transformation and her eccentric new friends. If you liked The Rosie Project or Britt-Marie Was Here, you’ll enjoy this book.

Here to Stay by Catherine Anderson

BookHere to Stay by Catherine Anderson is one of my staple romantic novels. Twenty-Eight year old Mandy Pajeck’s life revolves around caring for her younger brother Luke. Luke lost his sight as a young child, in a horrific accident that Mandy blames herself for. Mandy has done everything for the now angsty teenage boy since they were young. With an abusive father, and a mother who abandoned the two siblings, Mindy has always protected her brother and he never has to lift a finger. Luke plays on his sister’s guilt and  has never tried to learn to do anything for himself.

Romance is the furthest thing from Mandy’s mind until she meets hunky Zach Harrigan. Zach’s life used to revolve around parties and fun; he never had a reason to take anything serious. When his life begins to lack the luster it once had, Zach decides to use his expertise of horsemanship to do something meaningful for a change.  He begins to train a miniature horse to become a guide animal for the blind.  When Zach and Mandy cross paths, sparks fly, but Mandy just can’t let go of the past to make room for romance. As the two develop a closer relationship, Zach urges Mandy to confront her past, and the mystery of her mother’s disappearance. Could Zach be the one man that can change Mandy’s mind on love? Will she ever be able to move on from her past, and forgive herself for her brother’s blindness? A story of love, loss, and moving on; Here to Stay is chock full of feelings and hope.

As I Descended by Robin Talley

imagesBook–Roommates (and secret couple) Maria and Lily are students at the elite boarding school Acheron Academy. The girls excel at academics, extra-curricular activities, and popularity contests, especially Maria. The only problem, from their perspective, is that they are not the very best. Fellow student Delilah Dufrey holds this honor: she is valedictorian, captain of their soccer team, and a shoo-in for homecoming queen. Delilah is also at the top of the list to win the coveted Cawdor Kingsley prize, a full college ride and two years of free grad school to the winner. While none of the girls actually need the money, they all crave the status, and Maria wants to ensure that she gets into Stanford with Lily.

To ensure the prize goes to Maria and to stay together, Lily is willing to do anything, even exploit Maria’s belief in ghosts and the supernatural to convince her that getting the prize is foreordained. What follows is a a full-on, ghost-laden, Shakespearean tragedy that neither girl could have predicted where bad decisions pile on top of each other and lies beget more lies. Like The Tragedy of Macbeth that it’s based on, As I Descended is an exploration of the lengths that the desire for power can drive people to.

Letting Go by Maya Banks

Book – Josslyn is widow after a tragic accident. She finally decides to move on with her personal love life 3 years later. She has a wonderful set of best girlfriends who help her grieve, but no one has been her rock more than Dash. Dash is her dead husband’s best friend. Her husband, Carson, was abused relentlessly as a child and had never been able to provide Josslyn with the one thing she craved most – dominance in the bedroom. Dash has always had a romantic interest in Joss, and Carson is well aware of this, but absolutely secure in his marriage. After many years of grief, its time for her to step up and explore that world she has always wanted/needed but knew Carson could never give her. With lots of decisions, and expectations laid out for herself she obtains a membership at The House. The House is a safe and secure place to explore all your inner sexual fantasies without any judgment. On her first night there, she is discovered by Dash himself just feet inside the door. He is furious that she is that and she has no idea what she has gotten herself into. He drags her out of the building in an instant, takes her home and they have the awkward talk about why she was there and what she is looking for. At this point it is Dash her knows he is able to fulfill her every need with his long time Dominant/Submissive lifestyle. It is Dash who introduces her to the intriguing world of BDSM.

I found this book to be truly an eye opener into the world of BDSM. I have never read Maya Banks before, but am eager to see what other series she has. This is book 1 in a series called The Surrender Trilogy. This book does have some light BDSM , but it is a character driven story.  The character development is incredible. I cried, laughed, blushed, and ohh la la ‘ed with this story. Definitely a book for adults looking for a little steam, I highly recommend this entire series. There are surprises all along the way.

His Bloody Project by Graeme Macrae Burnet

dbd04a03f81f114a28fac1068a273e72Book—  His Bloody Project concerns the murder of a husband, wife, and child in a remote 1800s Scottish highland town. There is no question that local teenager Roderick Macrae is guilty. Framed as a series of historical documents found by the author, Macrae’s fictional descendant, the novel captivates not on the basis of who did the murders, but why he did the murders. We get views of Roderick from his neighbors, his lawyer, the newspapers, his priest, a famed criminal anthropologist of the time, and his own diary, each of them proffering viable explanations . Despite all of this testimony, I was unsure at the end what motivated Macrae and am still spinning theories to explain his reasons.

I was surprised to learn this novel was shortlisted for the Man Booker prize. His Bloody Project has all the drive and atmosphere of a tautly written thriller and is more reminiscent of the documentary Making a Murderer than the literary fare that generally garners Man Booker prizes. If you enjoy this novel, I would recommend others with compelling, unreliable narrators in historical settings, such as The Other Typist by Suzanne Rindell.

The Accountant (2016)

Movie – The Accountant opens with a scene of Christian Wolff as a child getting ready to do a puzzle while his parents speak to someone about his condition. As Christian is finishing the puzzle, one piece is missing and Christian has an episode because he cannot take not finishing something. Another autistic girl finds the missing puzzle piece on the floor and gives it to Christian so he can finish his puzzle. This gives the audience a peek into the type of autism Christian may have.

As an adult, Christian is a certified public accountant. He is a high functioning autistic person. Christian lives alone, and goes through life with his routine intact. A very important aspect to Christian’s autism is that he must finish what he starts. If he does not, it can have some very dire affects we see later on in the film. Some of Christian’s clients include heads of large criminal organizations. This causes the US Treasury Department to look into Christian’s work. It also makes Christian and his associate look at a non-criminal client to try to stay off the Treasury Department’s target list. This doesn’t work well as a cover.

The movie is a good opening act for what I am sure will be a series of action movies. It leaves itself open for possible sequels. Though somewhat predictable, the movie gives a small glimpse into one type of autism. One critic from UpRoxx went as far to call Christian Wolff a superhero for autistic kids. I can see it following in the footsteps of the Bourne series and even the more recent John Wick series. Recommended for fans of Ben Affleck, numbers, and action movies. There is some blood but not as gory as other action movies.

The Wonder by Emma Donoghue

indexBook–Based on some 200 cases of ‘fasting girls’ in the US and Great Britain throughout the 19th century, The Wonder follows Lib Wright, a no-nonsense nurse who trained under Florence Nightingale in the Crimean War, who is contracted to determine the veracity of the titular Wonder, a young Irish girl named Anna O’Donnell whose family claims she, of her own volition, has not eaten since her birthday several months ago. Together with taciturn nun Sister Michael, the two women watch Anna in shifts, Lib hoping to expose the O’Donnell family as frauds and secure her own reputation back home. Lib begins to realize, though, as she gets closer to Anna, that their watch is rather cruel. If, up until their watch, Anna has been fed in some covert way and their watch has put an end to it, they are complicit in starving Anna. As Anna begins to grow weak with undernourishment, Lib must decide if she will watch Anna’s slow death, as the village seems to wish her to do, or put a stop to it.

Set just after the Great Famine, the reader can easily see how Anna and her family have made a virtue of not eating. A child who claimed to be full quickly would be a source of relief to her struggling parents. The unique setting, religious faith, and a web of irresponsible adults and family secrets conspire to keep Anna trapped in her fasting and it is difficult to read. The reader feels culpable for Anna’s abuse just as Lib does. This intense read combines the richly detailed, thoroughly researched historical fiction that Donoghue is known for with the pulse-pounding immediacy of her 2010 breakthrough hit Room.

The Girl Before by JP Delaney

Book – Emma and her boyfriend Simon are looking for an affordable flat. Emma is still reeling after a break-in at her previous home and none of the places available in their budget seem safe. Until the agent shows them One Folgate Street, a spectacular modern structure, with sleek, minimal furnishings. It also includes a lease with hundreds of stipulations. Emma is delighted with the house, because its electronic systems and sensors will provide a safe haven for her. The owner of the home, Edward Monkford, is also the architect. Once Emma moves into the house, her life begins to change. She questions her relationship with Simon, revisits the evening of the break-in and eventually is forced to confront her past demons. Jane, who moves into the house after Emma, also has had some recent troubles. She begins to wonder what happened to Emma and the people who lived in One Folgate Street before she moved in. All is not as it seems in this suspenseful story of love, trust, betrayal and madness. I couldn’t put this book down and was surprised by the twist of events. If you enjoyed Gone Girl, Girl on the Train or The Woman in Cabin 10, you’ll be intrigued by The Girl Before.

Close Enough to Touch: A Novel by Colleen Oakley

Book – Close Enough to Touch by Colleen Oakley is the wonderfully whimsical story of a girl who is allergic to human touch.  Young Jubilee Jenkins was an oddity in her small town, due to an allergy that seemed too ridiculous to be true.  Doctors diagnosed her with a severe allergy to physical contact to other humans.  Her body lacked something that all humans possess, an unfortunate reality that caused her to break out in hives at even the lightest touch.  As a child, a fatal event nearly takes her life, and so Jubilee becomes untouchable, living alone and hidden from the world for nine years.  When her mother passes unexpectedly, Jubilee must finally face the world on her own.  Finding solace in her very first job as a Circulation Clerk at the local library,  Jubilee slowly begins to open up after an encounter with a struggling divorced father named Eric.

There were a lot of things I liked about this book.  I thought the concept was really unique.  As soon as I opened the book jacket and read “allergic to touch,” I was hooked.  I’m also a sucker for stories involving libraries or working in libraries, so this novel was a good match for me.  The only thing that really bothered me was that I thought it ended much too soon and abruptly.