Pogue’s Basics: Money: Essential Tips and Shortcuts about Beating the System by David Pogue

Book – I love to read books about saving money. Pogue’s book focuses on ways to save that don’t require a lot of time or lifestyle changes. One chapter highlights shopping hacks, such as the timing of purchases, finding online discounts and maximizing Amazon prime, coupons and gift cards. For the home, he discusses cutting the cord (from cable) and methods of economizing heating and cooling. The book also covers cars, travel and tax tips. One chapters details things you can do to earn money and another considers your existing financial arrangements. His writing style is casual and easy to understand. A fun, quick read that just may end up saving you a few dollars. Pogue also wrote Pogue’s Basics: Life: Essential Tips and Shortcuts for Simplifying Your Day.

The One-Page Financial Plan by Carl Richards

financialBookThe One-Page Financial Plan: A Simple Way to Be Smart About Your Money discusses overall strategies for setting up a personal financial plan. Richards emphasizes letting go of the past and the need for perfection that often paralyze the process. Your plans should fit your goals and lifestyles; there is no one-size-fits-all plan. He guides you through analyzing your spending values and gives examples from his own life and clients. I liked his focus on examining your personal motives and setting your goals to reflect them. One person may have travel as their primary financial expenditure, while another person may direct their finances toward saving for a college fund. Richards also asserts that analyzing your spending habits will help you determine if you need to to redirect your funds. He stresses that this exercise is not to make you reduce money toward what you enjoy doing, but to identify and reduce spending on items you deem non-essential. This book inspired me with its emphasis on setting up a financial plan that makes sense for today and that takes the ups-and-downs of life into account.

The $1,000 Challenge: How One Family Slashed Its Budget Without Moving Under a Bridge or Living on Government Cheese by Brian J. O’Connor

1000Book – Personal finance Editor and syndicated “Funny Money” Detroit News columnist O’Connor moved to Detroit with his family shortly before the Great Recession of 2007. As his personal financial situation declines, he is looking for ways to save more, invest more and spend less. He makes a mission to cut his family’s expenditures by $1,000 a month over the course of ten weeks, and record their progress in a series of newspaper columns. He sets up ten categories to target for savings, such as transportation, groceries, entertainment and groceries. Devoting a chapter to each category, he discusses ways to free up cash, make ends meet and “pinch pennies so hard that Lincoln gets a headache.” I liked his approach, although I found his humor a bit monotonous. I didn’t find many new specific ideas, but was intrigued by the idea of setting a specific family budget challenge and methodically working through categories to explore possible savings.