Help Me!: One Woman’s Quest to Find Out If Self-Help Really Can Change Your Life by Marianne Power

Book – I love self-help books and so does Marianne Power, author of Help Me!: One Woman’s Quest to Find Out If Self-Help Really Can Change Your Life. There’s something to say about finding a self-help book that truly speaks to you. Even if the book doesn’t necessarily “help” you achieve the goal you’re hoping for, it is nevertheless cathartic reading.

I can especially relate to the following:

So why did I read self-help if it didn’t, well help?  Like eating chocolate cake or watching old episodes of Friends, I read self-help for comfort.  These books acknowledge the insecurities and anxieties I felt but was always too ashamed to talk about. They made my personal angst seem like a normal part of being human. Reading them made me feel less alone. 

After the “worst hangover ever,” and realizing she is desperately unhappy, Marianne embarks on the ultimate journey of self-discovery: she will read one self-help book per month for an entire year and each month follow the author’s advice to a “T”.  From facing her fears (skydiving and posing nude for an art class) to using Rejection Therapy to face her social anxieties, she hopes to find happiness and fulfillment. Unprepared for the stress and depression that accompany her journey, she is determined to see the project through. With humor and honesty, Marianne shares a deeply intimate and emotional examination of her life, which is therapeutic and relatable.

Marianne read a variety of self-help books along with other resources, including The Secret by Rhonda Byrne, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey and Daring Greatly by Brene Brown.

The Mystery of the Exploding Teeth: And Other Curiosities from the History of Medicine by Thomas Morris

Book – You can absolutely judge a book by its cover, because I knew as soon as I saw this one that it was going to 1) be incredibly grotesque, 2) talk about one of my favorite historical topics (strange things people used to believe about the human body), and 3) contain exploding teeth. I’m horrified by the very thought, I had to read it.

This is a delightful collection of grotesque and horrifying stories about the strange things people used to believe about the human body, including, yes, exploding teeth. (Maybe. The author suggests some possible alternative explanations.) It covers everything from heroic and unlikely surgeries (saving lives by pinching blood vessels closed with bare hands!) to unlikely and undoubtedly worthless inventions (the tapeworm trap, which you were supposed to bait with cheese, swallow, and then pull out of your throat using the included string). This book is not for the weak of stomach, but if you’ve ever wanted to be enjoyably grossed out by medical history for a while, it’s a fun option. If you’d prefer to be grossed out by medical history in audio form, try the podcast Sawbones, which covers many of the same topics, hosted by a husband-and-wife comedian-and-doctor team.

The 57 Bus by Dashka Slater

BooksThe 57 Bus is a “ripped from the headlines,” true story of one teenager lighting another’s clothes on fire on a public bus in Oakland. Author and journalist Dashka Slater goes beyond the headlines to present the story and characters in great detail and nuance.

Sasha is diagnosed with Asperger’s Syndrome and does not identify as male or female, instead using the pronoun “they.” Sasha has supportive parents and goes to a school where they have many friends, but on the public bus ride across Oakland from school back home Sasha’s skirt is lit on fire by Richard. How will this affect Sasha, their family, friends, and community?

Richard’s actions were unquestionably intentional. Sasha spent weeks in the hospital having painful surgeries in an to attempt to repair the burns. Should sixteen-year-old Richard be charged with a hate crime in addition to the obvious charges he faces? Should he be tried as an adult or a juvenile? What are the potential ramifications of these decisions?

I am not good at remembering the specifics of books and movies, nor do I remember the lyrics to many songs. (You really don’t want me on your trivia team.) I like most of the books I read, but ask me to recall the plot and characters a few months later, and we’ll be lucky if I can extract much information.

It’s too early to tell since I only recently read The 57 Bus, but I think my recall of it will be different. The characters and plot are memorable. The journalistic treatment of the story—seeing the perspectives of friends and family of both teens, in addition to getting a glimpse into the workings of the juvenile justice system, made this book a well-rounded and thought-provoking read.

Let’s Get Crafty!: Fun Books to Ignite Your Creative Side

Books – Try one, or all, of these books today to learn a unique craft! From paper plants, to buttons and badges, to cat-lovers projects galore, we’ve got you covered with these crafty books full of DIY ideas!

Handmade Houseplants by Corrie Beth Hogg

If you’re a fan of Origami or other paper crafts, check out Handmade Houseplants and create beautiful works of art for all your favorite houseplants, even cacti and succulents! All of the different plant projects are so beautiful and I always enjoy finding new ways to show my plant love. Use the designs to create your own handmade greeting cards to share with friends and family, too.

Tiny Stitches : Buttons, Badges, Patches, and Pins to Embroider by Irem Yazici

Feeling the need to jazz up a jean jacket, or make crafty accessories to wear and share? Take home Tiny Stitches : Buttons, Badges, Patches, and Pins to Embroider and learn to stitch and sew to your hearts content! There’s something for everyone in this book full of metal pins embellished with embroidery, to patches of all shapes and sizes, and more!

The Cat Lover’s Craft Book : Cute and Easy Accessories for Kitty’s Best Friend by Neko Shugei

Find super cute projects to show your love of cats! Learn new skills, including embroidery and sewing to create tons of things to wear and share. From badges, to bags and purses, to doorstops and pillows, this book has a project for everyone!

A Beginner’s Guide to Low-FODMAPS and Happier Stomachs

Book List– A plethora of trending diets seeking to soothe symptoms of digestive disorders and create happier stomachs, includes the Low-Fodmap Diet. FODMAPs – Fermentable Oligosaccharide (mainly Fructose), Disaccharide (mainly Lactose), Mono-saccharides and Polyols (mainly certain fruits & vegetables) are carbohydrates seen by health ‘experts,’ as poorly absorbed by the small intestine and trigger digestive symptoms.

The low-FODMAP Diet : Step by Step : A Personalized Plan to Relieve the Symptoms of IBS and Other Digestive Disorders with More Than 130 Deliciously Satisfying Recipes by Kate Scarlata and The Complete low-FODMAP Diet : A Revolutionary Plan For Managing IBS and Other Digestive Disorders by Sue Shepherd are especially helpful introductions to the Low-FODMAP diet, offering detailed definitions, guides, and recipes for beginners.

Beat Your Bloat : Recipes and Exercises to Promote Digestive Health by Maeve Madden covers general digestive issues, gives detailed information on specific disorders, and treatment diets, including Low-FODMAPS. In addition to introducing a stomach-friendly diet plan with recipes, this book incorporates exercise-specifically yoga in treating symptoms.  As a super-fan of yoga, I highly appreciated this aspect of the book.

Digestive Health with REAL Food : A Bigger, Better Practical Guide to an Anti-inflammatory, Nutrient-dense Diet For IBS & Other Digestive Issues by Aglaée Jacob is the most informative of the books, giving an overview of digestive issues and personalized diet treatment plans for specific symptoms/disorders. This guide is “bigger” in size and contents, but well worth the read.

The Bloated belly Whisperer : See Results Within a Week, and Tame Digestive Distress Once and For All by Tamara Duker Freuman

What a perfect title – one that inspires hope!  This book includes a detailed quiz to best match symptoms to specific disorders and delves into those conditions in each chapter. I found this helpful to analyze specific symptoms, learn their possible causes, and treatments.

Check out related downloadable ebooks through Hoopla Digital.

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb

Book – I was excited for the recent release of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist & Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb and am happy to report that the book exceeded my expectations.

Lori explores her personal experiences from the point of view of as therapist and patient. The concept of therapists seeking therapy for themselves was one I had never before considered. This prompted me to question how we, as a society view therapists.  Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is insightful, deep, thought-provoking and shows therapists in a different light. At the base we are all human beings, but as a people who pay others to provide a service, she demonstrates a unique lens in which to view therapists. Lori also shares stories about the work she did with patients, which includes humorous narration when describing her true feelings of an especially difficult patient. I find the therapist-patient relationship particularly fascinating and enjoyed reading all of the experiences Lori had to share.

She begins the book leading up to a devastatingly unexpected breakup, which ultimately leads her to seek out a therapist when she hits the breaking point. The order of events are easy to follow, as she switched between the present and past narratives.  Learning about her career path and the events that ultimately led her to become a therapist, is a journey of seeking and discovery we may all relate to. Her story on this is enlightening. Lori is a relatable author and readers will find at least one aspect to connect with in Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.

 

Exploring Anxiety Through Memoirs

Book List – There is a variety of self-help books concerning mental health. Memoirs are my favorite genre, featuring real stories from real people who share their raw experiences with mental illness. The following books explore anxiety through memoirs.

Okay Fine Whatever: The Year I Went From Being Afraid of Everything to Only Being Afraid of Most Things by Courtenay Hameister

In her memoir of goals, the author challenges herself to attack her fears face to face – an admirable task to take on, in a year. I was particularly interested in the chapter on using a Sensory Deprivation “Float” Tank – an adventurous activity, especially for the claustrophobic.  Hameister’s writing can come across as crude, due to her bluntness of storytelling, but I enjoyed how she narrated her inner monologue with each new experience. The book concentrates on fear, which I feel is strongly related to anxiety and the fear that prevents us from venturing into new and terrifying futures and endeavors.

Little Panic : Dispatches From an Anxious Life by Amanda Stern

The author’s memoir details her childhood growing up with anxiety and worry. I enjoyed reading of Amanda’s experiences, but also found them stress-inducing. Plagued by daily panic that her mother will suddenly die, or forget her own daughter exists, Stern lives in constant fear that everyone she loves might suddenly leave her. As a child of divorce, she is also caught between two conflicting worlds: that of the bohemian, free-spirited life with her mother and the strict, cold sterile environment with her father. I appreciate her honest and detailed narration, growing up a child fearing that her whole world could fall apart in an instant.

Other related books include: On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety by Andrea Petersen, and Hi Anxiety: Life With a Bad Case of Nerves by Kat Kinsman.

 

 

Behave: The Biology of Humans at our Best and Worst by Robert M. Sapolsky

Book – It’s the fundamental question of the biological and social sciences — why do humans do the things they do? Every discipline has its own answers, from the complex chemical interactions of neurobiology to the deep history of evolution. In Behave, Sapolsky pulls together all of these and more to explore the causes and meanings of human behavior, with an eye toward the most important question of all: How can we be better people?

This book is long, hard going, but it’s well worth it – it’s one of the only books on neuroscience I’ve ever read where the author doesn’t treat the core biological mechanics of neurochemicals and genes as though that provides a meaningful answer to any question. Rather, Sapolsky goes into detail about the interaction between genes, hormones, biochemistry, environment, and long-lasting biological change, making it clear that while there’s a biological explanation for everything, there are so many variables involved that saying we can identify a single source of any given human behavior is laughable at best. The book really gets good in the second half, when he starts to apply all this to the things we’re really concerned about – compassion and generosity, violence and aggression. Sapolsky is optimistic overall, but he makes it clear that improving society is going to mean fighting our biology in some ways (or, more effectively, learning how to trick it).

Large Print Books

Books – Large Print Format You may not be aware, but we have over 1000 titles in our Large Print collection. Yes, the books are a tad bigger in size, but the font is undeniably easier on the eyes. The collection is located in the Adult department toward the back of the Library, in between the Biography section and the magazines. We own fiction, nonfiction, and mysteries and are continuously adding new titles.

Here’s a little secret – if you are impatient to read a new book that has numerous holds, check to see if the title is available in Large Print. If so, then it could be available on the shelf.  If not, the hold list may be short. Members who checked out Large Print as an alternative, found that they actually prefer the print size.

Discover which Large Print tiles we own, by doing the following at one of our IPAC stations:  on our catalog page click on “Advanced Search”, scroll down to “Limits”, check the box next to “Large Print Books”, then click on the green “Advanced Search” button.

If you are interested in any titles that we do not have in our holdings, please feel free to fill out an Item Request form, available at the Info or Youth Services Desk, or submit an e-form http://warrenville.libnet.info/itemrequestform available on our Library’s website.

Here is a sampling of what we recently ordered:

The Great Alone by Kristin Hannah
The Clockmaker’s Daughter
by Kate Morton
Every Breath
by Nicholas Sparks
Night of Miracles
by Elizabeth Berg
The Reckoning
by John Grisham
Leadership in Turbulent Times
by Doris Kearns Goodwin

The following are part of our Library’s holdings, that made the Best Books of 2018 list:

Transcription by Kate Atkinson
Virgil Wander by Leif Enger
Educated by Tara Westover
The Feather Thief by Kirk Wallace Johnson
Calypso by David Sedaris
The Library Book by Susan Orlean
The Witch Elm by Tana French
Kingdom of the Blind by Louise Penny
Lethal White by Robert Galbraith
Dark Sacred Night by Michael Connelly

Also very popular in our Large Print collection:

Becoming by Michelle Obama
Where the Crawdads Sing by Delia Owens

 

NeuroTribes by Steve Silberman

Link

Book – Odd and unusual behaviors do not in and of themselves constitute a disorder unless they are related to a manifestation or, to a series of dysfunctions within an individual.  Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs one’s ability to communicate and interact with others.  This is often characterized by restricted interests, repetitive behaviors, intellectual deficits, and unusual responses to sensory experiences. Those with Autism can vary highly in their symptoms.  Current diagnostic material now includes Asperger’s, PDD-NOS, and Childhood Disintegration Disorder, which were at one time utilized apart from one another.

NeuroTribes is a must-read for anyone in the field of education neuropsychology. The book dives into the developmental history of our understanding of Autism and its implications for those living with the condition, their families, researchers, and the media.  Growing up alongside a family member on the spectrum of Autism and working with children who have special needs, NeuroTribes gave me significant insight into the drastic changes differential diagnoses and treatment of those with disabilities, has made over the decades.

Few would argue that a parent’s sole responsibility is to care for one’s child. Desperate to affect the course of a child’s plight, we need not wonder why parents of children with Autism unceasingly seek out answers to the behaviors associated with Autism & are willing to try new therapies, diets, and approaches — all in the hope of finding a cure.

Attempting various alternatives to give children with Autism the best possible interventions available, parents and aides alike will find comfort in knowing that efforts in helping loved one manage daily hardships, is an undertaking which numerous people share. Neurodiversity is not wrong, simply – different. Although countless difficulties abound in the lives of those with Autism, we can and should, embrace the way in which persons with Autism think and perceive the world.

NeuroTribes is also available on Hoopla and Overdrive.