The Athenian Murders by José Carlos Somoza

atheniBook – In ancient Athens, one of the pupils of Plato’s Academy is found dead. His teacher Diagoras is convinced the pupil’s death is not as accidental as it appears, and asks the famous Heracles Pontor, the “Decipherer of Enigmas,” to investigate. As the death toll rises, the two men find themselves drawn into the dangerous underworld of the Athenian aristocracy, risking their own lives to solve the riddle of these young men’s deaths.

The Athenian Murders is more a game than a novel. It’s a novel, too – if it weren’t it would be intolerably tedious, like the Greek fiction it’s pretending to be – but the point of it is the game, not the fiction. While Heracles Pontor and his employer are getting into trouble with the Academy and the families of the murdered youths and eventually a rather ominous cult, the really interesting stuff is happening in the footnotes. You see, the novel we are reading is being translated by an unnamed Translator from a transcription by an earlier scholar. And the Translator is sure that this is an eidetic text, in which the original author has hidden images that combine to form a second, hidden meaning. His colleagues tell him he’s going crazy with this obsession, and he starts to believe them – until he’s kidnapped and forced to finish translating both the manuscript and the eidesis.

To tell any more would be to give away the twist, and to do that would be to spoil the whole book. Just know that the mystery, while serviceable, is not really the point here. If you’re as intrigued by the sound of eidesis and mysterious translators as I was, though, give it a try – this is a book that rewards intellectual curiosity.

Daughter of Smoke and Bone by Laini Taylor

daughterBook – To her friends and classmates Karou appears to be an ordinary foreign exchange student studying art in the timeless city of Prague. She has typical relationship troubles and is dealing with the disappointment of a cheating ex-boyfriend. However, it becomes apparent how extraordinary she is when she fends off the continued advances of her ‘ex’ armed only with wishes.Then she is summoned on a clandestine mission of….tooth collecting? Karou’s true identity is a mystery hidden even from herself, until she meets a winged echo from her past.

This book was listed among the YALSA top ten best fiction titles for young adults in 2012. The audiobook was nominated for several Audie Awards, and the movie rights have been sold to Universal Pictures. Daughter of Smoke and Bone is the first in a fast paced trilogy that takes on a much darker tone with the second book Days of Blood and Starlight. Taylor is thoughtful about the impacts of war on her characters and the worlds she has created. This world-building trilogy might appeal to fans of Greek mythology and stories about angels such as Cassandra Clare’s Mortal Instruments Series.

Broken Harbor by Tana French

Broken-HarborBook – Many thought the Spains had the perfect life. Sweethearts as teenagers, they are happily married with two wonderful children. They buy their dream starter house in a luxury development in Broken Harbor near Dublin.  But something goes horrifically wrong! Patrick and the children are brutally murdered and Jenny the wife and mother is miraculously found still alive at the murder scene, but barely. It is up to veteran detective Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy and his new rookie partner Richie Curran to solve the crime. As the detectives further their investigation they find that things are not what they seem. The victims’ façade of the good life begins to unravel and secrets and various suspects surface including the Spains themselves. We also learn of Kennedy’s mysterious attachment to Broken Harbor. The author, Tana French, is a master of psychological suspense and this book will not disappoint. This is the fourth book in the Dublin Murder Squad series. They do not need to be read in order, but if interested, here are the titles in sequence: In the Woods, The Likeness, Faithful Place, Broken Harbor, and The Secret Place.

 

Majestrum by Matthew Hughes

majestrumBook – Henghis Hapthorn is a creature of logic. He uses his skills and talents to solve puzzles for the elite of the Archonate, the vast empire of human colonies spread throughout known space. Recently, though, he’s suffered a few setbacks. A dangerous encounter with a rogue magician – rare in this age of science and reason – has transformed Hapthorn’s computer assistant into an animal familiar, which now needs to sleep and eat, and has developed a personality of its own. Worse, the intuitive part of his mind has become its own person, and Hapthorn finds himself having increasingly bitter disagreements with himself. And now the Archon himself has hired Hapthorn to investigate a mystery that goes back to the origins of the Archonate, deep within the last age of magic, which may cause the foundations of the world to turn, leaving Hapthorn’s valued logic entirely useless.

Hughes’s prose is elaborate and ornate, making this relatively short book a somewhat denser read than I was planning on, but I loved it anyway. Hapthorn is a Sherlock Holmes type, but with problems Holmes never had (Watson never passed out in the middle of the action, or refused to work without regular deliveries of exotic fruit). The mystery is well-constructed, but the real joy is in exploring the universe Hughes has created, one based on science but where magic is real and increasingly important in the most important events of the universe.

The Killer Next Door by Alex Marwood

The Killer Next DoorBook - Hossien is looking for someplace to live. Vesta has never lived anywhere else at all. Cher shouldn’t be living here. And Collette, according to her former boss, shouldn’t be living at all. Everyone at 23 Beula Grove, a run-down boarding house in South London, has a secret, from the scummy landlord to the quiet man who lives upstairs and never tries to make friends, but some of their secrets are more dangerous than others.

The Killer Next Door isn’t much of a mystery; although there’s some ambiguity over who the killer is, the possible suspects are narrowed down pretty quickly. That isn’t the focus of the book, though, which is instead concerned with how all these very different people make a life for themselves in something less than the best of circumstances, how they help each other out when help is needed, and how they betray each other without ever meaning to. I enjoyed spending time with these characters, and I’ll be making time to read Marwood’s first novel, The Wicked Girls.

Festive in Death

festiveBook - Festive in Death is the 39th book in this series and while you don’t technically need to read them in order, they’re nowhere near as much fun to read if you don’t.

When Eve’s nemesis, Trina, stumbles over a dead body with one of her friends, Eve is enmeshed in an investigation where the deceased is hard to like. A womanizer who juggles and uses is found dead with a kitchen knife pinning a note through his chest that says, “Santa Says You’ve Been Bad!!!” Sifting through the muck of his relationships and planning for the ever exasperating holidays, Eve does what she always does, looks for justice, regardless of the victim.

I love this series. Saying that, I’m totally biased when it comes to the Christmas themed stories. Some of my friends rolled their eyes and said, “Here we go again, same old, same, old,” but I love that. I love the fact that each year Eve is a little more comfortable with her new extended family, with shopping, and there is an awesome excuse to look into the lives of the bit-players from earlier in the series. I will continue to not only read, but purchase these books for as long as JD Robb keeps writing/publishing them.

Some Enchanted Eclair by Bailey Cates

some enchantedBook- Katie Lightfoot is a baker with a twist, she’s recently found out that she’s a lightwitch. What exactly that is, she’s not sure and is slowly figuring out. In this installment, Hollywood has taken over Savannah’s historic district. From her boyfriend Declan on security, to her friend Bianca as an extra, Katie’s whole group is involved while she’s happy to keep out and run her bakery. A fired caterer, a fixer, and an enterprising spirit pull her into the production and a dead body keeps her there.

The fourth in the series, Some Enchanted Eclair, is a fun romp through a deep-Southern community. I enjoyed revisiting the characters from earlier books and look forward to seeing exactly what a lightwitch is and how it impacts Katie’s life. Not only that, but the twist near the middle that shakes things up a bit is fodder for many more stories! If you’re looking for a fun, light read this as well as the earlier books in the series will surely delight.

The Beekeeper’s Apprentice by Laurie R. King

Beekeeper's AppBook – Even if you are not a Sherlock Holmes fan, you can’t help but be delightfully drawn into the adventures of the newly formed sleuthing team of Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. They are an unlikely pair. Mary is only 15 years old, a recently orphaned American who is a fiercely independent feminist. Holmes is mostly retired from detective work and lives a quiet existence keeping bees in the country. Mary impresses him with her intelligence, and Holmes slowly teaches her the art of detection.  As his apprentice, she quickly catches on and makes her own valuable contributions in solving cases. She evolves into taking on a more active role in his investigations and Holmes is inspired into coming out of retirement. However, their exposure and enthusiasm brings some bad guys out of the woodwork and Mary and Holmes find themselves confronted by perils and threats of death that they never anticipated.  Heartwarming and witty, the mysteries that this pair solves will keep readers wanting for more.  Fortunately, this is only the first book in the Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes mysteries. The Library has all the books in the series for readers to enjoy.

 

Broken Harbor by Tana French

brokenBook – Top detective Mick Kennedy is the lead investigator for a heinous crime that has resulted in the deaths of Patrick Spain and his two young children. His wife, Jenny, is in intensive care. The crime took place in the family’s home, a large, fancy house in one of the newer half-abandoned developments in an outlying suburb in Ireland. As Mick and his partner, Richie, begin to delve into the investigation, they began to realize that all is not as it seems. At the same time, the case unearths memories for Mick and his sister, Dina, that have remained unresolved from their childhood. As Dina unravels, the case also begins to spiral out of control. Tana French’s stories and characters are compelling and terrifying. Broken Harbor was an eerie place and a haunting story. French has written several other psychological thrillers, including In the Woods.       

The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

cuckooBook - The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith is a compelling, fun to read mystery. Set in modern day London, private investigator Cormoran Strike, a decorated wounded war veteran, is trying to keep his struggling agency afloat.  His life is an emotional mess and a new client gives Strike hope. John Bristow’s supermodel adopted sister Lula Landry is dead, and though the police have ruled it a suicide, he is convinced that she was murdered by being pushed off her balcony. He hires Strike to find the killer.  In order to give his full attention to the case, Strike employs Robin as a temporary office assistant, who turns out to be more valuable than he anticipated. The problem is that he really can’t afford to keep her. The investigation is an entertaining romp through the world of fashion and celebrities, as Strike and Robin form a sold fact finding team. Readers will continue reading to find out if there really was a killer and if Robin will stay on working for Strike or take a full time position elsewhere. Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling. This mystery series is very different from the Harry Potter books and appropriate for more mature readers.  Recently published, the second Cormoran Strike book is The Silkworm.