My Favorite Thing is Monsters: Book One by Emil Ferris

Graphic novel – Set in Chicago in the 60s, My Favorite Thing is Monsters is the semi-autobiographical story of Karen, a ten-year-old girl who pictures (and draws) herself as a werewolf. After her upstairs neighbor dies mysteriously, her death officially labeled a suicide, Karen takes it on herself to investigate, learning about her lovely neighbor’s history as a Holocaust survivor, her older brother Deeze’s many and varied relationships with women, and just exactly how far her monster mask will take her. Meanwhile, her mother is dying of cancer, Martin Luther King, Jr. has just been killed, and Karen is probably in love with her best friend.

This is an incredible story, richly layered, full of wonderful, fully-realized characters. Despite the youth of the narrator, there are a lot of heavy themes, but they are rendered with their full complexity intact. And the art is astounding – printed on paper lined like a spiral notebook, the sketchy pencil drawings are absolutely gorgeous, whether Ferris is rendering Deeze’s many weary ex-girlfriends or Karen’s favorite works from the Art Institute. The only unfortunate thing? It ends on a cliffhanger, and Book Two doesn’t come out until next year.

Monstress: Volume 1: Awakening

Graphic Novel – In Monstress, arcanics are a hybrid of ancient ones and humans. Ancient ones are mystic beings with immortality and special abilities. Known as witches, human women have evolved to have special abilities too. They have been at war with the arcanics for some time. Humans capture arcanics sell them into slavery, experiment on them, and kill them.

Maika was donated to The Order by a local merchant. The Order is a group of powerful witches that have waged war on arcanics. Maika is not a normal arcanic. There is something different about her. Maika is trying to find out was she is. She knows she is more than an arcanic and goes in search of answers. Joining Maika on her journey are Kippa, a young foxlike arcanic and Master Ren, a talking cat with several tails, from a race known as children of ubasti in the story.

This being the first volume very little is revealed until much later in the story. The first three chapters do not give the reader much of a backstory. The story is intriguing and made me want to keep going once I got through the first three chapters. With several storylines to keep track of, it makes the read a little overwhelming and confusing at times. I have found this to be normal with first volumes though.

The style of drawing is a cross between manga, steampunk, and contemporary comics. The world the creators have imagined is stunning. Arcanics are varied and beautifully imagined. Some include wings and horns, talking monkeys, ram headed humanoids, talking cats, and some ride unicorns. There is some violence and blood, along with some nudity.  I would recommend this for readers looking for something imaginative, interesting storyline, and intricate artwork. I welcome what is to come in this story and am sure to will enjoy the future volumes.

Harrow County: Countless Haints by Cullen Bunn and Tyler Crook

indexGraphic Novel – Although she’s about to turn eighteen, Emmy hasn’t seen much of the world. She lives alone with her father on their farm somewhere in the South and dreams of seeing more – until the night of her birthday, when everyone in town turns on her, even her own father, and she’s forced to flee for her life before she even knows why, or what it is about her that the spirits in the forest gather to protect her…

This is a terrific little Southern Gothic ghost story, just eerie enough to be disturbing if read too late at night, but without the excess of gore that you see in so many horror comics. The art is beautiful, done in a soft watercolor that adds to both the comfortable mundanity of Emmy’s home and the otherworldly feel of the haints and spirits. Emmy is a great character, struggling not only with her newfound power but with what it means about her and her place in the world. Fans of Welcome to Night Vale and Penny Dreadful will enjoy this series.

Stoker (2013)

StokerMovie – It may not have anything supernatural about it, but Stoker is definitely a monster movie. It’s also a coming-of-age story, following eighteen-year-old India, played exquisitely by Mia Wasikowska. In the wake of her father’s death, India’s home is invaded by her father’s brother, Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode), who is determined to make his new place in their home permanent, no matter what.

If you’ve seen Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt, this might sound a little familiar, and with good reason. The similarities extend beyond the plot as well. Director Park Chan-wook, an acclaimed Korean director who makes his English-language debut with Stoker, is a master at creating tension out of tiny things, and the whole film is made up of tiny things that slowly piece together to become one big, horrifying thing. This is a disturbing movie, definitely not for everyone, but fans of dark psychological horror should love it.