The Keep by Jennifer Egan

Book – In a remote castle somewhere in Eastern Europe, a young man joins the crew that’s working on turning the castle into an unplugged resort, a place you can go to really escape from everything. The crew is led by his cousin, who our narrator once abandoned in a cave when they were both children. In prison, a convict begins to write a story, trying desperately to impress the pretty young writing instructor he’s falling in love with. Which one of these stories is real, which one is true? Better not to try to figure it out, but just to go along for the ride – and what a ride it is.

I always enjoy stories with unreliable narrators, and this one has two, which is pretty terrific. The story in the castle is a little surreal and more than a little Gothic; the story in the prison is emotionally complex and exciting – not your usual writing-about-a-writer scenario. And I loved both of them, which is unusual for me; usually in a book with two parallel narratives I strongly prefer one or the other. Jennifer Egan is a strong, compelling writer, and I look forward to exploring more of her books. I’d recommend this to fans of Claire Messud and Haruki Murakami.

The Mirror Sisters by V. C. Andrews

29430815Book – From the author of Flowers in the Attic, comes a new disturbing tale of twins, appropriately titled The Mirror Sisters by V.C. Andrews.

I should have known what to expect from this creepy, chilling novel centered on identical twins, Haylee Blossom Fitzgerald and Kaylee Blossom Fitzgerald.  With a manic and controlling mother, the sisters received a truly identical upbringing, and were taught to view themselves as a single perfect being.

As children, their mother ensured that each twin received exactly the same treatment and experiences.  If one twin received a new dress, the other must also have an exact duplicate.  Likewise, if one child happened to cut her finger on a broken shard of glass, the other must be pricked in the exact same spot of the exact same finger.  Differences in behavior and thought were frowned upon and punishable.  Though centered on the relationship between the two girls, I enjoyed that this story also had a strong focus on all relationships within the Fitzgerald family.  The obsessed mother.  A troubled father.  It was cool to see those unique family dynamics.

The story as a whole left me frustrated, and stayed with me long after reading.  I applaud V.C. Andrews for composing a complexly disturbed narrative I simply couldn’t put down.  Definitely not a feel good story in any respect, but well worth the read.

 

The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary Pearson

adorationBook – To what lengths should parents go to keep their child alive? Should they do it even if it’s illegal? Is it really in the best interest of the child? The Adoration of Jenna Fox explores these questions and addresses issues of medical ethics. I don’t usually read young adult science fiction books, but I was mesmerized by this one. Jenna wakes up after being in a coma for over a year. She is 17 and has almost no memory of her previous life. Her parents try to jog her memory by having her watch videos of her childhood. As she slowly recalls events in her life, new mysteries surface for Jenna. Why did her family move from Boston to California, especially since her father still works there? Why is her grandmother cold and hostile toward her? She is remembering having two best friends – why aren’t they getting in touch with her? This is an interesting story of suspense that would appeal to both adults and teens driven by Jenna trying to define her identity. This book has received starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher’s Weekly, and School Library Journal.  The next book in this series is The Fox Inheritance.