Splice (2010)

4271Movie- Geneticist couple Elsa and Clive have successfully spliced together the DNA of different living animal organisms and created a pair of hybrids named Fred and Ginger, a scientific breakthrough that promises to yield great medical benefits. However, they are not satisfied, and wish to create creatures with human genetics. Against the wishes of their employer, they clandestinely create a human hybrid with DNA from all kinds of animals. Elsa treats the creature like a daughter, putting it in dresses, teaching it language, and naming it Dren. As Dren begins to get older (and more aggressive), Elsa and Clive move her to Elsa’s abandoned childhood home, a farmhouse and barn with plenty of room to hide Dren. Meanwhile, the Fred and Ginger experiment goes horribly, publicly wrong, with disturbing implications for Dren that earn this movie’s R rating.

Dren’s character design resides squarely in the uncanny valley, by turns beautiful and ineffably creepy. Without spoiling anything, the relationships among the characters in this film are really twisted and the movie’s end is quite graphic. I enjoyed the suspense and quiet build-up of the earlier half of the film more than the series of increasingly unpleasant events that make up the latter half of the film, though I suspect many who typically enjoy films in the horror genre will relish the ending. Splice will appeal to fans of other films with genetic experiments gone wrong, such as Jurassic Park and The Fly.

 

The Rosie Project by Graeme Simsion

Rosie ProjectBook – Don Tillman, socially awkward professor of genetics, wants a life partner despite “evidence” that he is “unsuitable” for women. He enlists the aid of his only two friends, Gene and Claudia, and embarks on the Wife Project. A madcap, often hilarious, quest to find true love ensues. Don’s scrupulous honesty and literal interpretation of events creates laugh-out-loud scenes and exposes the sometimes hypocrisy of social conventions and norms. When he meets spontaneous and troubled Rosie, Don’s ordered world is turned upside down. He attempts to approach the new situations he encounters with his usual controlled focused intensity, but is surprised by the outcomes and his own reactions. I didn’t want this entertaining adventure to end. Happily, a sequel is in the works and the screen adaptation of the book has been optioned by Sony Pictures. If you enjoyed Christopher in Mark Haddon’s The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time, you may want to meet Don Tillman.