One Plus One by JoJo Moyes

oneBook – Jess is a single mother with a lot on her plate. Her adopted stepson is regularly beaten up by neighborhood thugs, who taunt him for wearing make-up and being a loner. Her young daughter, Tanzie, is a mathematical genius who has an opportunity to go to a special prep school that Jess cannot afford. Jess is estranged from her dead-beat husband, Marty, who lives with his mother and hasn’t supported the children financially or emotionally for two years. To make ends meet, Jess waitresses and cleans houses. One of her clients is the software billionaire, Ed. Although Jess doesn’t know it, Ed is being investigated for insider trading. Their paths cross unexpectedly as Jess sets out on a trip to secure scholarship money for Tanzie. It’s a fun and entertaining adventure as four eccentric and lonely people discover their strengths, vulnerabilities and their “tribes.” Moyes has written several other novels, including Me Before You.

Raising Stony Mayhall by Daryl Gregory

raisingBook – Stony Mayhall isn’t like other kids. His skin is cold and grey. He doesn’t hurt when he’s injured. Oh, and he’s been dead since he was born. On a cold night not long after the zombie uprising. Wanda Mayhall found the body of a young mother by the side of the road, but the baby in her arms reached out when Wanda came close, so she brought it home and raised it as her own. No one knows why Stony grew up, even though he was a zombie, but they know they have to keep him a secret.

Unlike most zombie stories, Raising Stony Mayhall isn’t really a horror novel: it’s a story about family, and finding out who you are. Stony grows up in isolation, but his discovery that there are other living dead folks walking around brings his life into a new perspective. The point isn’t to scare you but to make you think. Daryl Gregory calls the genre he writes in “anti-horror,” a story that starts out seeming like horror but which turns into something much more positive. Even if you’re sick to death of zombie stories, give this one a try: it’s not at all what you’ve become used to.

The Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs

appleBookThe Apple Orchard by Susan Wiggs is a highly entertaining light read great to take along to the beach or enjoy while traveling. Tess is an expert at antiques and returning lost treasures to their rightful owners. She is career driven, has a fast-paced life in San Francisco, and is on the verge of being promoted. She has no real family ties; her mother travels extensively and she never knew her father. Tess’ life is about to dramatically change when a handsome banker named Dominic shows up and gives her the news that she has a grandfather, who is hospitalized, and a half-sister, Isabel. Tess also finds out that if her grandfather does not pull through, she and  Isabel are heirs to a vast apple orchard in Sonoma Valley. Tess joins her new found family on the estate, learns about her roots and she and Isabel uncover some family secrets, including family involvement in the Danish resistance against the Nazis. While the sisters acquaint themselves with each other Isabel cooks and bakes – her passion. Some recipes are included. Highly recommended for fans of women’s fiction, this book is just the right combination of family, romance, secrets and a little mystery.  This is the first book in the Bella Vista Chronicles series.  I look forward to reading the second – The Beekeeper’s Ball.

Broken Harbor by Tana French

brokenBook – Top detective Mick Kennedy is the lead investigator for a heinous crime that has resulted in the deaths of Patrick Spain and his two young children. His wife, Jenny, is in intensive care. The crime took place in the family’s home, a large, fancy house in one of the newer half-abandoned developments in an outlying suburb in Ireland. As Mick and his partner, Richie, begin to delve into the investigation, they began to realize that all is not as it seems. At the same time, the case unearths memories for Mick and his sister, Dina, that have remained unresolved from their childhood. As Dina unravels, the case also begins to spiral out of control. Tana French’s stories and characters are compelling and terrifying. Broken Harbor was an eerie place and a haunting story. French has written several other psychological thrillers, including In the Woods.       

The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith

cuckooBook - The Cuckoo’s Calling by Robert Galbraith is a compelling, fun to read mystery. Set in modern day London, private investigator Cormoran Strike, a decorated wounded war veteran, is trying to keep his struggling agency afloat.  His life is an emotional mess and a new client gives Strike hope. John Bristow’s supermodel adopted sister Lula Landry is dead, and though the police have ruled it a suicide, he is convinced that she was murdered by being pushed off her balcony. He hires Strike to find the killer.  In order to give his full attention to the case, Strike employs Robin as a temporary office assistant, who turns out to be more valuable than he anticipated. The problem is that he really can’t afford to keep her. The investigation is an entertaining romp through the world of fashion and celebrities, as Strike and Robin form a sold fact finding team. Readers will continue reading to find out if there really was a killer and if Robin will stay on working for Strike or take a full time position elsewhere. Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling. This mystery series is very different from the Harry Potter books and appropriate for more mature readers.  Recently published, the second Cormoran Strike book is The Silkworm.

The Girl With All the Gifts by M.R. Carey

girlBookThe Girl With All the Gifts is such a unique reading experience that I really don’t want to spoil it by telling you too many things about it before you start. So instead, I’ll introduce you to the main character, Melanie. Melanie is a very special little girl. She wakes up every morning in a cell, and soldiers strap her to a chair to take her to class. On the best days, class is taught by Miss Justineau, who was the one who told Melanie the story behind her name. Sometimes, one of the other children from her class will disappear, and no one will explain where they went or why. And then, one day, Melanie finds out.

This is a tremendously moving book, full of rich characters and heartfelt relationships. Miss Justineau cares so much for Melanie, and Melanie for her, but even the less sympathetic characters grow on you over time as you learn, along with Melanie, more about who they are and what they care about and fear. If you liked Kauzo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, Richard Matheson’s I Am Legend, or Mike Carey’s other work, you will love this book.

Looking for Me by Beth Hoffman

lookingBook – Teddi Overman owns an antique shop in Charleston, where she can fulfill her passion for restoring and selling antiques. She works with her two quirky employees, Albert and Inez. While her life is filled with her work, friends and caring for her Grammy Belle who lives nearby, she is haunted by her childhood and the family she left behind in rural Kentucky. She is estranged from her mother, who wanted her daughter to be a secretary and disapproves of her career and life choices. She also mourns the loss of her younger brother, Josh, who mysteriously disappeared years ago. As she tries to reconcile her present with her past, Teddi uncovers the secrets hidden beneath her family’s pain and comes to terms with their choices. Charming, hopeful and filled with eccentric characters, this book is an engaging summer read by the author of Saving CeeCee Honeycutt.

The Toyotomi blades : a Ken Tanaka mystery by Dale Furutani

toyotomiReading mysteries set in interesting locations is one of my favorite forms of armchair travel. In this whodunit Ken Tanaka, who became an amateur detective when he solved a murder involving a samurai sword in California, is invited by a Japanese television show to an all-expenses-paid trip to Tokyo to share the story of his adventure. Descriptions of the nuances of his travels were especially entertaining.

Despite being a third-generation Japanese American, Ken experiences some culture shock as he interacts with the television studio team. He also learns something about himself and his identification as an American regardless of his ethnicity or minority status. His humble sense of humor is likable and the overall tone of the story is light.

In addition to traveling among the sights in Tokyo, Ken’s sleuthing propels him into a treasure hunt in rural settings near Kyoto. Japanese history and legends color this mystery nicely. The historical embellishments as well as some code deciphering are slightly reminiscent of a Dan Brown novel. However, descriptions of humorous missteps that occur while traveling in a foreign land lighten the tone of this book.

The Matchmaker by Elin Hilderbrand

matchmakerBook – Dabney Kimball Beech is the enthusiastic Director of Nantucket Island Chamber of Commerce. Married to a famous economist  and professor, she has built a full life promoting the island and making a home for her husband and daughter, Agnes. She also has a gift for matchmaking, as over forty couples can attest. She sees a mysterious pink haze for a loving match and a bilious green haze when trouble will follow. When Agnes falls for the rich and controlling CJ, she ignores her mother’s warnings against the match. Then, Dabney’s first love, Clendenin Hughes, arrives back on Nantucket after being gone for more than twenty years. Dabney is forced to confront feelings she thought were behind her, even as events around her begin to spiral out of control. This novel explores love, friendship and second chances. I enjoyed spending time with these characters. It’s a great book to bring to the beach. Hilderbrand has written several novels, including Beautiful Day and Silver Girl.

The Other by Thomas Tryon

otherBook – I came across this book through Tor.com’s Summer of Sleaze, a series of reviews of old horror novels, where the writers refer to Tryon’s work as “a third of our horror roots,” along with Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist. I’d never heard of Tryon before, so I was intrigued. And I was not disappointed. In fact, I’d say my expectations were set unfairly low – after all, the review series is called “Summer of Sleaze.” There’s nothing sleazy about The Other. A little purple, maybe, but not sleazy.

Holland Perry is not a nice little boy. In fact, he’s downright sinister, pulling pranks that are more vicious than funny. (We find out on page three that he killed an old woman’s pet cat.) His twin, Niles, is a much friendlier young man, but he makes plenty of excuses for Holland’s increasingly outrageous behavior. This is a slow-building novel; we spend lots of time with the characters where nothing particularly awful happens, until quite suddenly it does. And although The Other was billed as horror when it came out, it’s much less supernatural than the other evil-child stories of its day. In fact, I’d call it a psychological thriller instead, with as much in common with Gone Girl or The Dinner as with more traditional horror novels.