The Glass Castle: A Memoir by Jeannette Walls

Book – Jeannette Walls recounts her unique and unstable childhood in The Glass Castle: A Memoir. From the outside, life looks like a never-ending adventure for Jeannette and her siblings.  On good days, her father Rex’s wild imagination takes his family across the United States, a family of vagabonds high on wanderlust. But then the bad days came; the money ran out and all their dreams seemed to have expired.

Confined to a dismal town, Rex became a constant drunk, stealing the family’s dinner money to feed his need.  Meanwhile, Jeannette’s mother, Mary was lost in her own world, an artist obsessed with a need for excitement, such that couldn’t be filled by caring for her young children. It was up to a young Jeannette and her siblings to take care of themselves, learning how to live and survive amid the escalating dysfunction and chaos.

Jeannette recounts her youth in a way that retains her parents’ dignity, as unstable as they were.  Readers are able to see her parents as lost souls failing to reach their dreams, forced into a life they didn’t want.  This struggle to find fulfillment in life is something we can all relate to.

Jeannette also wrote Half Broke Horses: A True Life Novel, a prequel of sorts to The Glass Castle.  The subtitle, A True Life Novel, gives readers a clue as to why the book is noted as fiction.  The book was originally intended to be a biography on Jeannette’s grandmother, Lily Casey Smith, but the author was missing too much information for it to be categorized as completely biographical.  However the powerful character  of Lily Smith comes across just as vividly as the characters in Jeannette’s first memoir.

Everything Everything by Nicola Yoon

EE-200x300Book: Madeline Whittier never steps outside of her house. She has never attend regular school. And the only people she talks to are her mother and Carla, her nurse. Madeline (or Maddy) has SCID which an extremely rare disease and it basically means that she is allergic to everything AKA she is a bubble child. And Maddy has been okay with that, she accepted her fate of living an isolated life. That is until the new neighbors move in and she sees Olly, the handsome boy wearing all black, through her window. And suddenly he is all she can think about and soon the only person she wants to talk to. But it is hard to have a relationship when you are never aloud to see them in person or touch them. As the two grow closer and closer, Maddy begins to take risks with her health and with her heart. But deep down inside she knows that falling in love with Olly can only end in disaster.

Everything Everything is a beautiful story about a teenage girl who wishes her life was normal so she could attend public school, kiss a boy, touch the world. This heartwarming romance will give you all the feelings and make you wish you could spend more time with Maddy and Olly. For readers who love realistic fiction, this is a must read.

Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos

Book – As a children’s librarian, there is no doubt that I am biased in favor of children’s books, but you don’t need to take my word for it that this one makes a fun read even for grown-ups. Besides the vote of confidence from the Newbery Committee, I have the testimony of my grandparents–neither of whom is a children’s book reader in general but each of whom devoured this one in a day, laughing all the way–to back me up in that claim.

1962 is the summer of eleven-year-old Jack Gantos’ perpetual grounding. With a nose that won’t stop bleeding, on the outs with both his parents and forbidden from playing baseball with his friends, Jack might have a grim few months ahead of him if not for his feisty elderly neighbor. Mrs. Volker, the resident historian of the small town of Norvelt, needs the loan of Jack’s hands to type up obituaries of her fellow orginal Norvelters, the rare task for which Jack is released from house-arrest. But when those obituaries start coming a little too thick and fast, Jack and Mrs. Volker become an unlikely team of sleuths, and fast friends into the bargain.

Part mystery story, part fictionalized memoir, entirely small town slice-of-life, Dead End in Norvelt explores questions of community and memory without ever feeling preachy. Centering as it does on an inter-generational friendship, it’s a great choice to share within families–but even if you don’t have a child, grandchild, niece, nephew or cousin to pass it on to, it’s well worth the rollicking ride.

Nothing Like the Holidays (2009)

Movie – I would like to start by confessing: I have never seen It’s a Wonderful Life, Miracle of 34th Street, or White Christmas. I know many are wondering how this is possible. Sure I’ve caught bits a pieces here and there throughout my life, but I have never sat down to watch any of these three Christmas movies. That being said, I still feel there are great holiday movies other than these three classics. Some of my more recent holiday classic staples include: Elf, Love Actually, The Family Stone, and Nothing Like the Holidays. The first three are more known than the latter.

Nothing Like the Holidays is set in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood and tells the story of a normal dysfunctional family going through tough times all around. There are the parents, Anna and Edy who seem to be drifting apart; one son, Jesse who just finished a tour of military service and does not want to take over the family business; a daughter, Roxanna scared to tell her family she is not a Hollywood star; and a another son, Mauricio who is having marital issues. All of them are coming together for the holidays and bringing their problems with them to share.

As I mentioned before, the movie was filmed in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood. It does a good job of showcasing some of the neighborhood and some of Chicago’s landmarks. The story is a little cheesy and at times tries too hard to convey emotion. It does a good job of keeping you entertained with the supporting characters and small family issues like the removing of a tree after drinking. Don’t try using power tools while intoxicated kids! Nothing Like the Holidays is a great movie for those looking to change up their holiday movie experience and see another side of Christmas in Chicago.

Unfinished Business (2015)

Movie – The best way to describe Unfinished Business is as a raunchy comedy with family life lessons. Vaughn is a businessman that has just quit his job and ventured out to start his own business to rival his old company. The only way to do that is by landing a big client and beating out his former company.

Throughout the adventure he is joined by the fresh out of water Mike Pancake (Dave Franco) and an old school businessman Timothy McWinters (Tom Wilkinson). Both characters, along with other well-known actors (mainly Nick Frost), lend some laughs and make the movie enjoyable. There is family drama back at home Vaughn is dealing with in his character’s way, which gives the movie that family life lesson feel. This is intermixed with some over the top raunchy comedic scenes not suitable for all ages.

I feel I was taken in two very different directions. On the one hand I found the raunchiness funny. Franco and Wilkinson characters were well played and made the movie funny. But then the family drama put the lead character into perspective and displays him as a family man trying to provide for his family by any means needed. This movie is not for everyone. Fans of Vaughn from Swingers and Made will not enjoy this. However someone looking for those “guy humor” laughs mixed with a warm your heart feeling may want to see this.

Interstellar (2014)

Movie – Heavy in physics, theoretical and practical, Interstellar is slow moving, with lulls that may drive some viewers away. It is just shy of three hours making some of the scenes long and hard to bear. Interstellar, however, does a good job at keeping viewers interested through an absorbing story, enveloping screen shots, wonderfully original score, and of course, sarcastic robots.
The story is one of plight and extinction. If Coop (McConaughey), cannot find an alternate planet for the remaining population of Earth everything will end. Food is scare and crops consist of corn, nothing else. I don’t think I could eat only corn for the rest of my life. Even then, the corn will soon die out too. The only way to survive is to travel through a wormhole to find an alternate earth-like planet.
A little wonky on what happens when you enter a black hole; die hard physicists may not like this part. But since no one has ever been inside a black hole, I feel Nolan can do as he likes. I enjoyed McConaughey, as well as the small part Matt Damon had, and loved the robots. This one is for fans of slow moving engrossing storylines, deep space travel, and unbreakable bounds. Those who are looking for alien life and futuristic worlds will have to look elsewhere.

The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake by Aimee Bender

particularBook – Imagine if you could taste someone’s emotions when you bite into a piece of cake, fresh from the oven.  Maybe you’d taste your mother’s happiness at the success of a new recipe, or the local baker’s despair of his broken marriage.  Would it be a gift?  Or a curse?

Aimee Bender’s explores this whimsical idea in her novel The Particular Sadness of Lemon Cake.  On her ninth birthday, Rose Edelstein is shocked to discover she has a taste for feelings after biting into a slice of cake baked by her mother. In that first bite, her world is shattered when Rose tastes her mother’s sadness and anguish.   Her new-found “gift” sends her reeling from the impact of knowing too much about people’s hidden secrets.  There is no escape from the emotions that assault her.  In this magical coming of age novel, Bender weaves a sorrowful, yet hopeful tale of a young girl caught up in the sentiments of others, trying to find herself among them.

I thought this was a wonderful read, a simple yet fantastical story that is actually quite relatable.  While the element of magic may not be found in our own lives, every family has its hidden secrets, the things we try to bury within ourselves.  This novel allows us to consider what might happen if those secrets were revealed, as well as realize the burden they hold over us.

 

The Miniaturist by Jessie Burton

miniBook – In 1686, eighteen-year-old country girl Nella arrives in Amsterdam to begin her life as the wife of wealthy merchant Johannes Brandt. She doesn’t know him well and finds his household strange and unwelcoming. His sister, Marin, runs the household and seems to lead a pious, austere life. The servants, Otto and Cornelia, are friendly, but cautious. In addition, Johannes is often absent and when he’s home, he’s preoccupied. Then, Johannes presents Nella with an extravagant wedding gift, a miniature version of their house. Nella is confused and overwhelmed by the gift, but with little to occupy her time, decides to begin furnishing it. She hires a miniaturist through the mail, and when the contents start to arrive, she is both fascinated and terrified. The miniaturist seems to be able to not only replicate their household down to the last detail, but also seems to be able to predict the future. As events begin to unfold, Nella struggles to figure out what’s real and what is an illusion. What I found most interesting about this book was the historical detail. Events transpire to illuminate both the lifestyles and attitudes of Amsterdam during this time period. The characters were interesting and complex. This story was full of secrets and intrigues and kept me guessing until the end.

The Vacationers by Emma Straub

vacationersBook – The Posts are going to Mallorca for a two-week vacation. Franny and Jim are celebrating their 35th Anniversary, but recent issues are casting doubt that they’ll celebrate their 36th. Their daughter, Sylvia, is happy to escape Manhattan for the summer to join them before she heads off to college. Bobby, her older brother, arrives with his girlfriend, Carmen, a fitness instructor who annoys the family. The guest list rounds off with Franny’s best friend, Charles and his husband Lawrence. When the guests are assembled in the luxurious villa, they begin to realize that their hopes and troubles have followed them to their holiday paradise. As the vacationers relax and explore the island, they discover truths about themselves and their relationships. I didn’t think I was going to like these characters as much as I did. Straub’s humor manages to be pointed, yet kind.Straub is also the author of Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures.

Broken Harbor by Tana French

brokenBook – Top detective Mick Kennedy is the lead investigator for a heinous crime that has resulted in the deaths of Patrick Spain and his two young children. His wife, Jenny, is in intensive care. The crime took place in the family’s home, a large, fancy house in one of the newer half-abandoned developments in an outlying suburb in Ireland. As Mick and his partner, Richie, begin to delve into the investigation, they began to realize that all is not as it seems. At the same time, the case unearths memories for Mick and his sister, Dina, that have remained unresolved from their childhood. As Dina unravels, the case also begins to spiral out of control. Tana French’s stories and characters are compelling and terrifying. Broken Harbor was an eerie place and a haunting story. French has written several other psychological thrillers, including In the Woods.