The Summer of Skinny Dipping By Amanda Howells

Book– Sixteen year old Mia Gordan spends the summer at her cousins lavish beach home in the South Hamptons. She expects a wild fun summer of reconnection with her favorite cousin and endless day’s of swimming in the ocean. What Mia didn’t expect was to find out her cousin is spiraling out of control into a world of drugs and partying, or that her cousins golden family exterior isn’t quite what it seems, and she definitely didn’t expect to fall in love this summer. After swearing off boys after having her heart broken by the one boy she thought she loved, she meets a boy, Simon, on the docks of her beach house one night when she is avoiding a raging party. Shrouded in mystery and excitement she meets him every night to go swimming. After weeks of meeting in secret they finally get together in daylight, not too soon after tragedy strikes and its left Mia’s world in pieces.

The Summer of Skinny Dipping by Amanda Howells Is a beautifully written novel about a girl and discovering who she is. I personally loved this novel and while it could be a little predictable at times it encompassed what it is like to be a teenager with typical boy and family problems. Would defiantly rate this a ten/ten.

They May Not Mean To, But They Do by Cathleen Schine

51Jz8l7pWXLBook – About Joy Bergman: “Oh, they broke the mold when they made that one. People who loved her said it, people who did not love her said it, too, for the same reason.” I fall into the former category. Joy is in her eighties and caring for her beloved husband Aaron, who has dementia along with other serious health issues. They are New Yorkers and Joy misses their daughter, Molly, who is living in California with her wife. Their son, Daniel, still lives close by, with his wife and their two young daughters. This story is about family and the ties that bind us during good times and bad. It highlights the issues we are forced to confront as we age, both from the perspective of the parents and their children. Schine, who also wrote The Three Weissmanns of Westport, explores these themes as she relates and finds humor in the most ordinary conundrums and routines. Joy laments about her physical deterioration, defends her take-out order meals and is determined to remain independent and upbeat. Molly feels guilty about living far away and she and Daniel search for ways (with sometimes hilarious results) to reassure Joy about her importance in their lives. Joy enjoys a special bond with her grandchildren and acknowledges that although she loves being in the midst of her family, she also finds them exhausting. This book reminded me that despite the differences in our individual circumstances, there is a shared commonality in our experiences as we face life’s transitions.

Calculating God by Robert J. Sawyer

indexBook – There are various times in one’s life where the discussion of death, and God, and the afterlife happen. When love ones pass, health issues arise, or in lectures with professors. In Calculating God the story centers on Thomas Jericho, a paleontologist from Toronto who is dying from lung cancer.

Two alien species from different planets, Forhilnors and Wreeds, have come to Earth to speak with paleontologists about evolution, science, and religion. Tom, being a scientist does not believe in God and is surprised both alien species firmly believe in a God. This makes for interesting dialogue between all parties. On the one hand there are aliens on Earth and want to learn about the evolution of our planet and species; but on the other hand both alien species believe in what we call God. Tom has a hard time grasping this even knowing his fate.

The writing is a little slower in pace and gives the reader points where reflection of one’s life may happen. There is a plot line that includes creationists and I did not understand why it was being included until it climaxed. Science fiction readers or anyone who may want to reflect on why illness happens or question if a higher power exists may find this book interesting. Readers who enjoy a book with minimal, but more developed characters will also like this book.

It took me two years to finish this book. This does not speak of the quality of writing, because Robert Sawyer does a great job of keeping the reader intrigued. I am a firm believer of the notion that sometimes you are not ready for a book. At the time I started it, I was not ready for it. I found it again and was bolstered by the ending.

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: and Other Lessons from the Crematory by Caitlin Doughty

indexBook- After witnessing a stranger’s accidental death as a child, Doughty has always been fascinated by death and mortality. This leads her naturally to getting a job in a crematory. Far from the sterile and sanitized version of death many people prefer to maintain, Doughty offers a more honest picture of what happens when we die. She tells of cleaning the bones out of the crematory, of smashing bones into “cremains,” and of many, many viscerally gross details that I won’t relate here. Even as just a memoir of her time in the crematorium, Doughty’s memoir is engrossing, informative, and, at times, hilarious.

However, during her time in the traditional death industry, Doughty has come to the conclusion that we as a culture live too far separated from death and dying. In the past, seeing an untreated dead body was not a rare sight. Today, the dead are either cleaned up and embalmed to look like they are sleeping, as in wakes and funerals, or whisked away quietly, as in hospitals where death is viewed as a failure of the medical system. Doughty wants us all to think openly and honestly about death since, after all, it is inevitable.

Smoke Gets in Your Eyes will appeal to fans of Mary Roach, who offers a similarly unadorned picture of the human body and its processes.

Elsewhere by Gabrielle Zevin

Book –What happens when we die?  Does Heaven await us in the afterlife, or perhaps the fiery pits of Hell?  Maybe, our souls merely evaporate into the air, leaving no trace of our existence.  Shall we meet the pearly gates or travel the River Styx?

Gabrielle Zevin explores this age-old question of what happens after life in her novel, Elsewhere.  Imagine that you wake up in a strange bed, aboard a ship you’ve never seen before, embarking on a journey to a place you’ve never heard of, called Elsewhere.  Fifteen year old Liz thinks she’s having a bad dream, until it finally hits her; she’s dead.

Dead and stuck in Elsewhere, all Liz wants to do is go back home, or at the very least find a way communicate with her family so they know she’s okay.  But the afterlife has other things in store for her.  In Elsewhere, people age backwards instead of forwards, and they return to Earth as infants.  so Liz is placed in the custody of her late grandmother, a woman she has never known.  This isn’t how it was supposed to be!  Liz doesn’t want to build a new life growing young; she wants her life back.  Maybe, just maybe, there’s more to  the afterlife than meets the eye…

I adored this book as a teen, and still consider it one of my favorites today.  The world of Elsewhere seemed like a fantasy to me, a quite intriguing hypothesis of what lies in store for us in death.  A morbidly light read, with a fun cast of characters and a charming story.

 

The Possibilities by Kaui Hart Hemmings

PossibilitiesBook – It’s been three months since Sarah’s 22 year old son, Cully was killed in an avalanche while snowboarding and she decides that it is finally time to pull herself together and go to work. She has also decided that it is time to go through Cully’s belongings and enlists the aid of her best friend, Suzanne. Sarah is shaken when they discover evidence that her son may have been involved in dealing pot. She also struggles that her idealized memories of her son may not be deserving and questions whether she could have been a better parent.

Soon after, a girl named Kit shows up on Sarah’s doorstep offering to shovel snow. Sarah’s father, Lyle, forms a comfortable bond with Kit and she soon reveals to them that she and Cully had a relationship. Sarah, still heavily grieving can’t believe that Cully kept this relationship a secret and she invites Kit into her home as a connection to Cully and to possibly learn more about her son. A memorial service planned for Cully brings together Cully’s mother, father, grandfather, Suzanne, and Kit. Kit makes an astounding revelation concerning Cully that could make a drastic impact.

This is a story of loss and heartache and how each character tries to find peace and come to terms with Cully’s death. This book has received starred reviews from Publisher’s Weekly and Kirkus Review. Kaui Hart Hemmings is also the author of The Descendants, which was made into a movie starring George Clooney which was nominated for an Academy Award for best picture.