Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

remember meBook – I’ve been reading a lot of Sophie Kinsella recently.  The Summer season always puts me in the mood for lighthearted comedies, and Kinsella’s books really hit the spot.

Remember Me? (not to be confused with the emotionally moving film featuring Robert Pattinson, although also worth a gander), by Sophie Kinsella , is a great choice for anyone who loves a good mystery with their comedy.  The novel follows Lexi sMART, a spunky young woman nicknamed “Snaggletooth,” who’s having a pretty crappy time in life. It’s 2004, and her boyfriend, Loser Dave, is always a no show, she was the only one who didn’t get a bonus at work, and then she’s in an accident to top it off.

When Lexi wakes up from her accident, she can’t remember anything.  It’s suddenly 2007, and she has no memory of the past three years.  She can’t recognize the tan, slim, flawless woman in the mirror. Life seems perfect: she’s married to a drop-dead gorgeous man, lives in a million dollar penthouse and is head of the company!  Things couldn’t be better, or so it would appear.  But things start to fall through when Lexi learns what kind of person she’s become, and just how imperfect her life really is.  Is it too late to rewind and change those last three years?  Is the past really lost for good?  Dive in to find out what happens!

With a quirky cast, drama, and secrets, Remember Me? makes a splash as a beachside read!  If you fancy some more Kinsella books, I highly recommend checking out Can You Keep a Secret? and The Undomestic Goddess. 


Stay by Allie Larkin

stayBook –The perfect novel for romantics and dog-lovers alike!  Stayby Allie Larkin follows Savannah “Van” Leone, a quirky young woman who has been hopelessly in love with her friend Peter since college.  Unfortunately, love has other plans for her–her best friend Janie is marrying her beloved Peter, and Van is forced into the role of maid of honor.  Love has never been so miserable!

Following the excruciating ceremony, Van drowns her broken heart in vodka and a Rin Tin Tin movie marathon, and promptly purchases a German Shepherd puppy online.   She soon finds that her furry friend is not the little puppy she expected, but rather, a GIANT.  As she wrestles with training her new pup, Van starts to mend her broken heart, and finds a new purpose in her life.  Yet just as she begins to open her heart up to someone else, everything comes crashing down.

Full of hysterical moments, a lovable dog, and a cute vet, this is a wonderfully fun, light-hearted read. It’s The Holiday meets Must Love Dogs, cute, funny, with a side of fluff.


Lexicon by Max Barry

lexiconBook – Emily Ruff, sixteen-year-old street hustler, is recruited by mysterious besuited operatives into an elite Virginia boarding school with an unusual mission.  A decade later, unremarkable Wil Parke is kidnapped in a Portland airport by a man who, contrary to all appearances, claims to be saving Wil’s life.  And somewhere in-between and on the other side of the world, the two will meet at the center of an unprecedented cataclysm that will destroy the entire town of Broken Hill, Australia–an event caused by nothing more or less than one very deadly word.

Lexicon is not quite science fiction, not quite fantasy, but will appeal to fans of both.  The story centers around the Poets, an organization that uses neuro-linguistic programming–technology which the text itself admits is indistinguishable from magic words–to hack the human brain and control the behavior of others.  The fast-paced, exhilarating plot is rounded out with just the right amount of romance.  The villain is suitably loathsome, the heroes are stalwart and clever, but all of the characters are believable and well-rounded, with faults to match their virtues.  While fans of dystopian novels with gutsy heroines will love Emily, the worldbuilding in Lexicon is pleasingly distinct from the increasingly overdone post-apocalyptic genre.  In fact, much of the fascination of the story lies in just how believable it can be.  Overall, Lexicon is a deeply satisfying, ready-for-the-big-screen thriller.


Us by David Nicholls

usBook – Douglas Petersen, a scientist, is trying to cope with his wife Connie’s announcement that she thinks she wants to leave him. Also, his relationship with his recalcitrant seventeen-year-old son, Albie, has always been rocky. Douglas hopes that their family’s planned “Grand Tour” of Europe will somehow help them resolve their issues. He sets some personal goals for their inter-rail trip, including “It is not necessary to be seen to be right about everything, even when that is the case.” As they embark on the trip from their home in suburban London, Douglas narrates their experiences, and shares the story of his marriage to Connie and struggles as a father to relate to his son. Told in short chapters, and alternating from past to present, Douglas kept me entertained with his dry humor, insights and predicaments as he tries to approach his life in a new way.

The Girls from Corona del Mar by Rufi Thorpe

girlsBook – Lorrie Ann and Mia have been friends since they were young girls. Lorrie Ann seems perfect, the “good girl” from a bohemian and loving family. In contrast, Mia struggles to deal with her mother, who’s often drunk, haphazardly babysits her younger brothers and describes herself as having a “little black stone for a heart.” Despite their differences, the girls share everything and know everything about each other. Then, tragedy strikes Lorrie Ann’s family and events begin to spiral. As the story unfolds over the next fifteen years, Mia is forced to examine her beliefs about her friend, motherhood, families and about what it really means to be “good.” I found this debut novel to be thought-provoking and the characters were interesting. I reflected on the reliability of our memories and how the years and maturity can alter them. This book was realistic in that situations weren’t always resolved in the nicest or easiest way and different characters offered viewpoints, giving varying angles and “truths.”

The Vacationers by Emma Straub

vacationersBook – The Posts are going to Mallorca for a two-week vacation. Franny and Jim are celebrating their 35th Anniversary, but recent issues are casting doubt that they’ll celebrate their 36th. Their daughter, Sylvia, is happy to escape Manhattan for the summer to join them before she heads off to college. Bobby, her older brother, arrives with his girlfriend, Carmen, a fitness instructor who annoys the family. The guest list rounds off with Franny’s best friend, Charles and his husband Lawrence. When the guests are assembled in the luxurious villa, they begin to realize that their hopes and troubles have followed them to their holiday paradise. As the vacationers relax and explore the island, they discover truths about themselves and their relationships. I didn’t think I was going to like these characters as much as I did. Straub’s humor manages to be pointed, yet kind.Straub is also the author of Laura Lamont’s Life in Pictures.

Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty

big littleBook – Big Little Lies, by the author of the bestseller The Husband’s Secret, tells the story of the events leading up to a shocking death at an elementary school fundraiser. The tale revolves around a trio of women whose children are starting kindergarten at Pirriwee Public School in Australia. On orientation day we are introduced to Madeline, who is bold, humorous, and maternal. “Oh Calamity!” The husband who walked out on her and their newborn daughter years ago has moved to Pirriwee Penisula with a new wife, and their daughter will be attending kindergarten with Madeline’s youngest child. Then we meet Jane, a young single mother whose vulnerability stimulates Madeline’s protective instincts. Lastly Celeste is introduced. She is beautiful and wealthy but somehow disengaged from life.

The friendship of these three women is galvanized when a kindergarten incident fractures the school community. The story is infused with delightful humor about all the little absurdities of parental life and school society. In addition, the author is artful in her presentation of serious social issues such as domestic abuse. I listened to the audiobook narrated by Caroline Lee. Her lively Australian accent boosted the humor and helped me to visualize the characters and their life in an ocean-side locale. Big Little Lies is likely to be a movie as well, Nicole Kidman and Reese Witherspoon have picked up the screen rights.

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell

eleanorBook- To quote Mr. Elton John, “It’s a little bit funny. This feeling inside…”

The year is 1986, in Omaha, Nebraska. This is a story about two misfit teenagers who were not looking for love, but fell into it together. Eleanor is a frumpy, fiery redhead with a broken family. Park is an  average boy who wears eyeliner, and has a father who oozes masculinity. Eleanor is new in town, and she is forced to sit next to Park on the bus. Park reads comic books and listens to mix tapes to pass the time. Eventually Park notices Eleanor reading the comics with him, and their budding romance (and friendship) begins.

This is not just another sappy young adult romance novel. It deals with issues including, racism, bullying, body image, and domestic violence. Children of the ’80s and early ’90s would enjoy this book for the nostalgic factor alone. If you’re looking for a quick, easy read, but one that will linger on your mind, this one is for you.

The House on Blackberry Hill by Donna Alward

house on bBook – I was looking for a nice light read with a plot and characters that would invite relaxation. I got it in The House on Blackberry Hill by Donna Alward.

Abby Foster has had a difficult life growing up and her experiences from then have colored her attitudes about the house and history that she’s inherited. She wants nothing to do with a heritage that was denied her and her only goal is to sell and run. In order to sell, she needs to get the house in better shape. In comes Tom Arseneault, the contractor determined to work on the Foster estate. His specialty is restoring old homes and he cannot bear to see a house stripped and sanitized instead of restored.

While bringing this estate back to life, both Tom and Abby deal with their pasts in the hope of enjoying a future together.

A really fun, sweet read with enough twists and misunderstandings to keep it from being sappy, yet not so many that it defeated the purpose of a light, fluffy read. I enjoyed the journey that Abby made and some of the self-realizations were very well written and not once did I roll my eyes (that has often been the case in other books of this weight.) I will definitely revisit this series and look forward to the next one coming out in October.

The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison

RevisedBook – Ben Benjamin is in a low place – he’s lost his job, his home and his family. Hoping to start a new career, he enrolls in a night class called the “Fundamentals of Caregiving.” Upon receiving his certificate, he begins to care for his first patient, nineteen-year-old Trevor. Trevor has Duchenne muscular atrophy and requires an extensive amount of assistance from his mother, Elsa, and Ben. Trevor’s father, Bob, has awkwardly been trying to mend the rift he created with Trevor when he abandoned the family years earlier. Although Trevor and his mother have been rebuffing his attempts for years, when Bob is in a car accident, Trevor initiates the idea of a 600 mile road trip to visit him in Utah. When Ben and Trevor set off on their adventure, they have no idea about the people they’ll meet and the shift their lives will take on their journey.

While Ben struggles to keep a professional, emotional distance from Trevor, he also struggles with his own emotions in dealing with his tragic past. What keeps this book from becoming overly maudlin is the humor. The characters are quirky, and Evison highlights the absurd amidst the difficult situations in their lives. This book was an off-beat, surprising ride through the lives of Ben and Trevor.