The Fallback Plan by Leigh Stein

Book – This Fallback Plan creatively depicts the relatable growing pains and ennui of a recent Northwestern graduate living with her parents during a hot summer month in Lombard, Illinois. This novel, published in 2012, possesses the current voice of youth that is reminiscent of the writing in the television series Girls. The main character is struggling after a difficult final semester at school, yet her tone is light and her glib descriptions of her daily undertakings are fresh and amusing. Because the setting of the book is mainly within Lombard, I found the character’s humorous viewpoint on local area events and establishments to be especially enjoyable. The text contains discerning descriptions of the rituals of family life from the perspective of a twenty year old. More than that, the novel addresses the challenges impacting new as well as established families. Stein realistically captures the trials an individual faces with each identity adopted during the stages of life. I first became aware of this book upon viewing a telecast of a reading by the author at the College of DuPage. Here is a link to a video of Leigh Stein reading selections from her work at the college.

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

tell the wolvesBook – I truly enjoyed revisiting numerous forgotten details about the 1980’s with the teenage protagonist of this novel. It begins as fourteen-year-old June is losing her only friend,  her uncle Finn, to the then little-known illness AIDS. While it begins with a story of loss it transforms into a narrative about a quirky and intriguing friendship when June meets someone else Finn has left behind. This novel also paints a sensitive and believable picture of the complexity of family relationships, especially the relationships between siblings. The story kept me interested as secrets that were withheld from June, as well as the knowledge that comes with aging, transformed her perception of the world and of her understanding of the lives of those around her. The audiobook is read by Amy Rubinate. Her calm, youthful, but never saccharine, tone is pleasant and appropriate for the main character. Print and digital copies of this title are also available from the library.

Fin & Lady by Cathleen Schine

fin-ladyBook - Fin & Lady is a story about love and finding your family. When young Fin is orphaned, his free-spirited half-sister Lady becomes his legal guardian. Practical Fin and glamorous Lady have only spent a brief time together previously, but Fin adores her. They move to New York City and become part of the counter-culture of the sixties. Fin struggles to understand Lady’s turbulent relationships with several admirers and the new world around him. A cast of entertaining characters including the admirers, a spunky housemaid and a gentle dog move the story through many humorous situations. Lady is obsessed with being “free,” and this book explores what being “free” and loving someone really means. If you enjoy books by Elinor Lipman, you may enjoy this book centered on a family dealing with unconventional situations. I found this book to be a delightful read, with interesting dilemmas and some laugh-out-loud moments. Cathleen Schine also wrote The Three Weissmanns of Westport.

Arcadia by Lauren Groff

arcadiaBook – Bit was born in a commune in the 1970’s. Arcadia traces his coming-of-age in this idealistic setting. While his parents have big dreams, the reality of living in a communal setting is much harsher than they anticipated. Projects are delayed due to lack of participation or follow-through, drug use is rampant and the commune’s residents are often hungry and cold. However, the bucolic setting and the genuine love of his extended family hold Bit and his family to Arcadia House and the rise and fall of its fortunes. Bit falls in love with Astrid, the daughter of the charismatic leader of the commune, and as they grow up, he is forced to confront the truths about his beliefs, himself and those he loves. This book made me think about human nature and how things might play out in a communal setting. Through Groff’s writing, I could vividly picture the place and the characters.