The Good Girl by Mary Kubica

Book – Mia is the “good girl” in this page turning novel of psychological suspense.  She is an art teacher at an alternative high school and somewhat of a disappointment to her high profile Chicago judge father, since his other daughter and Mia’s sister is an attorney and following in his footsteps.  Her family connection results in Mia being kidnapped.  The man who abducts her, Colin, is being paid off to lure her on the pretense of a one night stand and deliver her to another party that will demand a ransom.  But for some reason Colin decides not to turn her over and hides out with Mia in a remote cabin in Minnesota.  Eventually Mia is saved, but is suffering from amnesia, having blocked the incident from her mind.  There is a lot going on in this story.  It is told from the perspective of 4 characters: Mia, Colin, Mia’s mother – Eve, and Gabe – the detective assigned to the case. It also jumps back and forth in time chronicling events during the incident and the aftermath. But readers will not be disappointed while trying to find out what really did happen and why, which is not revealed until the very end.

This book would probably appeal to fans of Gone Girl, but is less violent and graphic. 

Nothing Like the Holidays (2009)

Movie – I would like to start by confessing: I have never seen It’s a Wonderful Life, Miracle of 34th Street, or White Christmas. I know many are wondering how this is possible. Sure I’ve caught bits a pieces here and there throughout my life, but I have never sat down to watch any of these three Christmas movies. That being said, I still feel there are great holiday movies other than these three classics. Some of my more recent holiday classic staples include: Elf, Love Actually, The Family Stone, and Nothing Like the Holidays. The first three are more known than the latter.

Nothing Like the Holidays is set in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood and tells the story of a normal dysfunctional family going through tough times all around. There are the parents, Anna and Edy who seem to be drifting apart; one son, Jesse who just finished a tour of military service and does not want to take over the family business; a daughter, Roxanna scared to tell her family she is not a Hollywood star; and a another son, Mauricio who is having marital issues. All of them are coming together for the holidays and bringing their problems with them to share.

As I mentioned before, the movie was filmed in Chicago’s Humboldt Park neighborhood. It does a good job of showcasing some of the neighborhood and some of Chicago’s landmarks. The story is a little cheesy and at times tries too hard to convey emotion. It does a good job of keeping you entertained with the supporting characters and small family issues like the removing of a tree after drinking. Don’t try using power tools while intoxicated kids! Nothing Like the Holidays is a great movie for those looking to change up their holiday movie experience and see another side of Christmas in Chicago.

Fool Moon by Jim Butcher

fool moonBook- Fool Moon is the second book in a sixteen book series (with an additional eight short stories based in the world.) This audio book is read by James Marsters.

Fool Moon deals with the notorious gangster ‘Gentleman’ Johnny Marcone and the repercussions of the events from the previous book, however you do not need to read it to understand what’s happening, it’s just more fun that way.

Harry is broke and hungry and so listens to someone that needs his help over a steak dinner. This slip opens up an investigation involving five different flavors of were-wolves and endangers his life over, and over, and over, and over again. Basically a normal day in the life of Chicago’s only practicing wizard. With his wits and a whole lot of anger he works his way through a case that makes him look at humanity and the creatures of the Never-Never a little differently.

I adore this series and have read it no less than four times. A heroic tale ala Don Quixote, Harry always tries to do the right thing; even if it’ll kill him. This is my first time listening to it and I love it. James Marsters does a phenomenal job giving life to the various characters.

Devil in the White City by Erik Larson

Devil-in-the-White-CityBook – Beginning October 25, 2013, the Field Museum of Natural History will be offering a special exhibit, Opening the Vaults: Wonders of the 1893 World’s Fair. The exhibit will feature objects that have rarely—or never—been on display since they amazed fair goers over a hundred years ago, including a meteorite so feared it was kept chained in a dungeon. The exhibit will also explore how the fair brought visitors closer than ever to unique wonders like exotic animals, international cultures, and strange new products from all over the world. (Exhibit description excerpted from the Field Museum’s website.)
This brings to mind a fascinating non-fiction book, The Devil in the White City.  The book chronicles the politics, planning and construction of the Columbian Exposition in Chicago by renowned architect Daniel Burnham and his crew including Frederick Olmstead and Louis Sullivan. In a separate storyline we follow the gruesome murders committed by Dr. Henry H. Holmes in his hotel near the fairgrounds of the World’s Fair. Both his charm and the attraction of the Fair lured scores of young women to their deaths.
The Devil in the White City is grand and magical and yet evil and sinister. It reads like fiction and should appeal to fans of true crime, architecture, and history.

The Art of Migration by Peggy Macnamara

MigrationBook – According to Macnamara, Chicago lies along a bird migratory route called the Mississippi Flyway. Insects such as butterflies and dragonflies migrate through this area as well. This beautifully printed little book succinctly introduces novices such as myself to the migration groupings one might expect to see in the Chicagoland area each season. Reading this, it felt like a treat to go behind the scenes with Macnamara and her co-authors to learn what ecological wonders local naturalists have witnessed through their work and observations. The inclusion of ancedotes from local establishments such as the Willowbrook Wildlife Center and the Field Museum bring the narrative close to home. Macnamar’s art and words even take us behind the scenes into the restricted sections of the Field Museum. Each beautifully printed illustration is accompanied by notes on the production of the artwork. These notes would be especially helpful to any fledgling wildlife artist. Because portions of the book are arranged by season, it is easy to flip to the relevant section to gain some insight into what might be traveling through my neighborhood currently.