Words in Deep Blue By Cathy Crowley

Book- Rachel and Henry have been best friends since primary school, they have done everything together. In their ninth year in high school Rachel moves away but before she moves she wants to profess her love to Henry in the only way she can. By leaving a letter in one of the books in the Letter Library of his family’s bookshop. When she leaves to go to her new town she hopes that Henry will give her some sign that he got the letter, when three years come and go with no word about it she is devastated. To make matters worse her younger brother Cal is killed suddenly by the thing he loves most. At the end of year twelve Rachel must move back to her childhood city to try and find herself again, meeting Henry again along the way. When she is forced to work at Howling Books, Henry’s family second hand bookshop she must deal with the loss of her brother and best friend all over again.  When Henry is faced with his own major life changes he must find his way back to his old friend again if he ever hopes to find himself again.

This is just the book your looking for, for a cute and classical bookshop romance. Love and loss all/will play a big part in everyone’s lives and Words in Deep Blue exemplifies what it means to truly and deeply love someone.

Wild Things: The Joy of Reading Children’s Literature as an Adult by Bruce Handy

Book – As a book-lover, “what’s your favorite book?” is my least-favorite question. Do you mean my favorite book I’ve read this year? The book I recommend to other people most often? The childhood favorite I still re-read when I’m having a bad day? But then, beneath and beyond all of these, there are those books I read so frequently and at such a young age that I can no longer remember not having read them. They’re just a part of the world, like water and air.

Those are the books that Handy writes about – The Wind in the Willows, Charlotte’s Web, Ramona the Pest, Where the Wild Things Are, The Chronicles of Narnia. It’s hard to imagine childhood without them, but most of us (unless we have children who like to be read to) haven’t read them in years, or maybe decades. Handy argues that we should, that these books have as much to teach us about the human condition as the canonical great classes, and that they’re just as enjoyable, too.

A book like this runs the risk of being sentimental, and there are some moments that tug at the heartstrings – but Handy isn’t afraid to mention those times his own children didn’t understand the appeal of a favorite book, or when he finally read a classic that he just didn’t enjoy. For anyone who has loved books for most of their life, this is a delightful exploration of some of the books that may have inspired that love in the first place.

The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

Book – I tend to forgo reading the “Message to The Reader” section that authors sometimes include in their novels, instead going straight to the meat of the story.  But Amazon had a free preview of The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan, so I took advantage of the few pages I could indulge in.  The author’s “Message to Readers”  is brilliant, funny, and overall a wonderful addition to the book. Colgan describes the best places to read her book, necessitating comfort as the top priority.  I loved her witty sense of humor and thought the excerpt was a great introduction to the story.

And the story begins with Nina, a librarian in a small library that’s going under in a world that no longer wants physical books.  While her coworkers join the newly joined “library center,” Nina decides for once in her life to take a chance on her dream job: opening a mobile bookstore.  She impulsively buys a van, and travels to a small town miles away to start a new life for herself.  A romance blossoms when she meets a poetic train conductor, and a whole new adventure begins.

I love the premise behind this book: Girl Loves Books, Girl Loses Job, Girl Buys Van, Girl Turns Van into Bookstore, Girl Falls For Guy, etcetera…insanity ensuing.  However, the story started losing me about halfway through and I felt that it was dragging.  I stuck it out, hoping the pace would pick up, and though the story gained some interesting turns, it still left me feeling just a tad let down.

Jenny Colgan is still one of my favorite authors, and I especially adore The Little Beach Street Bakery and its sequel, Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery.