Ginny Moon by Benjamin Ludwig

Book – Ginny Moon is an autistic fourteen-year-old finally living in her “Forever House” with her adoptive parents, Maura and Brian. Abused and neglected by her mother, Ginny had been placed into foster care when she was nine. Ginny works with a therapist, Patrice, to help her set up guidelines for more successful relationships and behavior. She struggles to make sense of her world and rituals and rules help her. When her Forever Parents learn they are expecting a baby, their fears about Ginny’s behavior derail her progress. In the midst of their struggle, Ginny becomes increasingly intent on finding Baby Doll, who she remembers leaving behind in a suitcase when her mother was arrested. With her limited ability to communicate, she attempts to explain about Baby Doll. As Ginny’s story unfolds, we meet her biological family and, through Ginny’s eyes, we begin to understand what she is searching for. This poignant story made me think about how easy it is to jump to conclusions instead of really listening to the meaning behind the words. Ginny’s journey shows that life isn’t easy, being a hero isn’t easy and, most of all, being an outsider isn’t easy.

The Accountant (2016)

Movie – The Accountant opens with a scene of Christian Wolff as a child getting ready to do a puzzle while his parents speak to someone about his condition. As Christian is finishing the puzzle, one piece is missing and Christian has an episode because he cannot take not finishing something. Another autistic girl finds the missing puzzle piece on the floor and gives it to Christian so he can finish his puzzle. This gives the audience a peek into the type of autism Christian may have.

As an adult, Christian is a certified public accountant. He is a high functioning autistic person. Christian lives alone, and goes through life with his routine intact. A very important aspect to Christian’s autism is that he must finish what he starts. If he does not, it can have some very dire affects we see later on in the film. Some of Christian’s clients include heads of large criminal organizations. This causes the US Treasury Department to look into Christian’s work. It also makes Christian and his associate look at a non-criminal client to try to stay off the Treasury Department’s target list. This doesn’t work well as a cover.

The movie is a good opening act for what I am sure will be a series of action movies. It leaves itself open for possible sequels. Though somewhat predictable, the movie gives a small glimpse into one type of autism. One critic from UpRoxx went as far to call Christian Wolff a superhero for autistic kids. I can see it following in the footsteps of the Bourne series and even the more recent John Wick series. Recommended for fans of Ben Affleck, numbers, and action movies. There is some blood but not as gory as other action movies.