Catch Me If You Can by Frank Abagnale

Catch Me If You CanBook - Catch Me if You Can is the story of Frank Abagnale Jr. Frank was a pilot, a doctor, a lawyer, and a teaching assistant at a college all before he was twenty years old and all without a high school diploma. Catch Me If You Can tells his exploits as one of the most successful con men in history. I was absolutely floored when I heard some of the things he was able to get away with. I had to remind myself over and over that the era was a very different one and that computers were nowhere near as sophisticated as they are now, but still, the things people will believe when wrapped up in a believable package were almost sad.

One thing that really struck me in listening to this book, which Frank Abagnale has stated was exaggerated to a degree due to the co-writer’s editor’s demands, was the complete lack of malice in all of his actions. Not once did he set out to ‘get’ the little guy, he always targeted big corporations or banks with his scams. The man is brilliant and has since transferred his way of thinking towards helping the FBI and banks combat fraud.

I listened to the audiobook version and loved it. His story was also adapted into a movie and he is the only living person with a Broadway play based on his life.

The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt

goldfinchBook – This Pulitzer prize-winning story has been likened to a number of classic coming-of-age tales from Charles Dickens. The central character in this novel, Theodore Decker, loses his mother during a tragedy that he himself survives at a New York art museum. The traumatic event, told from Theodore’s perspective, provides a compelling start for the book.

The audiobook for this title is narrated by David Pittu. His narration is exceptional as his voice conveys the pathos of young Theo and the psychic burden that overlays his life. Theo and his mother had been estranged from his father, and after the events in the museum Theo is housed for a time in a beautiful Manhattan apartment with the wealthy family of a socially-inept schoolmate. His appreciation for the art and antiques in the apartment touches upon on-going themes in the book: the immortality of masterpieces, the messages they convey through the ages, and the profound attachments individuals form with these pieces.

I was especially glad to be listening to the audiobook version of this story when Theo, as a teenager, develops a friendship with Boris, a boy from Ukraine. Both author and narrator played delightfully with the Slavic dialect. Boris is a wonderful character because he brought levity and perspective to the story, and David Pittu’s Boris was very likable.

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

penumbraBook – “What do you seek in these shelves?” What recently unemployed graphic designer Clay Jannon sought was employment. His quest was successful at Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore; a place with bookshelves and ladders extending up three stories, and a collection of curious books that are never bought, but are “checked-out” by eccentric individuals. Clay calls upon his friends to assist him with investigating mysteries which extend far beyond the walls of the enigmatic store. This thought-provoking tale includes puzzles that revolve around technology as antiquated as the printing press and as cutting edge as Google wizardry. The humorous writing and optimistic tone make this novel a rejuvenating read. Appropriately, this book offers a surprise if the reader turns out the light. The audiobook does not offer that perk, but the narrator Ari Filakos delivers the likable Clay’s inner monologues and quirky humor so well that I went back and listened to some key sections to hear his moving delivery of them.

After Visiting Friends: A Son’s Story by Michael Hainey

after visitingBook – This memoir describes a ten-year search by the author to uncover the truth behind his father’s death in 1970. Hainey was six when his family received the tragic news that his father had been found dead on the street on Chicago’s North Side. Like his father before him, Hainey became a journalist, and he used his investigative experience to unearth the elusive truth about that night. This chronicle begins with a focus on the author’s mother and the telling of the story of his parent’s courtship at the Chicago Tribune. A colorful portrait of the lives of Tribune and Sun Times journalists at that time is told. Hainey relates memories of growing up in Chicago and reveals the impact his father’s absence had on his childhood. When he questions his family and his father’s co-workers, he gathers additional anecdotes about the lives of newspaper reporters in the sixties, but his sources remain quiet about the night his father died. Eventually, his dedicated search reveals the truth about that night, and in the process provides him with a rich history about the father he lost. For the audiobook, award winning narrator Dan Miller does a wonderful job with the preponderance of dialog for the interviews contained in this memoir.

Instructions for a Heat Wave by Maggie O’Farrell

instructions for heatwaveBook – Meet the Riordans. Gretta, a devout Irish Catholic, discovers her husband has gone missing during a crippling heat wave in 1976 England. Her three adult children gather together for the first time in years to help search for their father. Monica, the oldest daughter, is her mother’s rock and seems to have a well-ordered life. But her partner’s daughters despise her and she hides secrets that she has never faced. Her brother, Michael Francis, feels guilt over a past indiscretion and wonders if his wife, newly enrolled in community college, is having an affair. The youngest sibling, Aoife, has always had issues. She was a screaming infant and an unruly child, until finally, as an adult, she escapes to America and reinvents herself. The disappearance of their father is the catalyst that brings everyone together, and in the search for him, they discover and are forced to address the secrets and misunderstandings that have wedged between them. I listened to the audiobook of this title and was absorbed in the story and the narration by John Lee.

Tell the Wolves I’m Home by Carol Rifka Brunt

tell the wolvesBook – I truly enjoyed revisiting numerous forgotten details about the 1980’s with the teenage protagonist of this novel. It begins as fourteen-year-old June is losing her only friend,  her uncle Finn, to the then little-known illness AIDS. While it begins with a story of loss it transforms into a narrative about a quirky and intriguing friendship when June meets someone else Finn has left behind. This novel also paints a sensitive and believable picture of the complexity of family relationships, especially the relationships between siblings. The story kept me interested as secrets that were withheld from June, as well as the knowledge that comes with aging, transformed her perception of the world and of her understanding of the lives of those around her. The audiobook is read by Amy Rubinate. Her calm, youthful, but never saccharine, tone is pleasant and appropriate for the main character. Print and digital copies of this title are also available from the library.