The Forgotten: 4 Works of Fiction on Amnesia

From mysteries to romances, every genre has something to offer on amnesia, a most intriguing subject.

The Sci-Fi Drama: The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary E. Pearson

Jenna fox has lost a year of her life.  An unknown accident has left her with no memory of anyone or the life she lived before.  Her parents whisk her off to a new home, and refuse to talk about the accident.  As snippets of her memory return, Jenna discovers that her amnesia is only the tip of the iceberg.

The Mystery/Thriller: Before I Go to Sleep by S. J. Watson

Christine wakes up in a hospital with no memory of her life.  Her husband is a complete stranger to her.  Each day starts anew, with no memory of who she is, or the man in bed beside her.  With the recommendation of her doctor, Christiane uses a daily journal to try to uncover her past each day.  Slowly, she  discovers that nothing is really what seems.  It’s 50 First Dates meets the thrilling drive of Gone Girl.

The Romantic Comedy: Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

Lexi Smart wakes up from an accident, with no memory of the past three years.  She can’t recognize the tan, slim, flawless woman in the mirror. Life seems perfect: she’s married to a drop-dead gorgeous man, lives in a million dollar penthouse and is head of the company!  But things start to fall through when Lexi learns just how imperfect her life really is.

 The Tragedy: We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

Gat, Johnny, Mirren, and Cadence have always been inseparable.  Every Summer their families vacation at Cape Cod.  But then one Summer, tragedy strikes, causing Cadence to slip into an amnesiac state, suffering excruciating migraines, and struggling to put the pieces together to find out what happened.

The Good Girl by Mary Kubica

Book – Mia is the “good girl” in this page turning novel of psychological suspense.  She is an art teacher at an alternative high school and somewhat of a disappointment to her high profile Chicago judge father, since his other daughter and Mia’s sister is an attorney and following in his footsteps.  Her family connection results in Mia being kidnapped.  The man who abducts her, Colin, is being paid off to lure her on the pretense of a one night stand and deliver her to another party that will demand a ransom.  But for some reason Colin decides not to turn her over and hides out with Mia in a remote cabin in Minnesota.  Eventually Mia is saved, but is suffering from amnesia, having blocked the incident from her mind.  There is a lot going on in this story.  It is told from the perspective of 4 characters: Mia, Colin, Mia’s mother – Eve, and Gabe – the detective assigned to the case. It also jumps back and forth in time chronicling events during the incident and the aftermath. But readers will not be disappointed while trying to find out what really did happen and why, which is not revealed until the very end.

This book would probably appeal to fans of Gone Girl, but is less violent and graphic. 

Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson

Book – Imagine waking up in the morning thinking you had a one night stand, because the man next to you is a stranger and when you look in the mirror you are shocked to see a woman in her late 40’s, since you think you are 20 something. And the man, Ben, tells you that he has been your husband for 22 years.  This is what happens to Christine every morning in the gripping story Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson.  She has a type of amnesia, supposedly from an accident she had over 20 years ago and each night when she goes to sleep her memories from the previous day are erased.

Every day after Ben leaves for work, Christine receives a phone call from neurologist, Dr. Nash who is trying to treat her condition, reminding her to write in her journal. As she secretly continues writing in her journal and meeting with the doctor, memories slowly start forming.  But instead of relief, Christine becomes fearful and confused, because she finds the words, “don’t trust Ben” written in her journal and she suspects that Ben and Dr. Nash are lying to her.  She is beginning to remember and they are both giving conflicting information about her life.  Are they trying to protect her or harm her?

A heart pounding psychological thriller with a surprise ending. This book has received many starred reviews.  It was also made into a movie by the same title.  Readers who liked Girl on the Train would probably enjoy this novel!

Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

remember meBook – I’ve been reading a lot of Sophie Kinsella recently.  The Summer season always puts me in the mood for lighthearted comedies, and Kinsella’s books really hit the spot.

Remember Me? (not to be confused with the emotionally moving film featuring Robert Pattinson, although also worth a gander), by Sophie Kinsella , is a great choice for anyone who loves a good mystery with their comedy.  The novel follows Lexi sMART, a spunky young woman nicknamed “Snaggletooth,” who’s having a pretty crappy time in life. It’s 2004, and her boyfriend, Loser Dave, is always a no show, she was the only one who didn’t get a bonus at work, and then she’s in an accident to top it off.

When Lexi wakes up from her accident, she can’t remember anything.  It’s suddenly 2007, and she has no memory of the past three years.  She can’t recognize the tan, slim, flawless woman in the mirror. Life seems perfect: she’s married to a drop-dead gorgeous man, lives in a million dollar penthouse and is head of the company!  Things couldn’t be better, or so it would appear.  But things start to fall through when Lexi learns what kind of person she’s become, and just how imperfect her life really is.  Is it too late to rewind and change those last three years?  Is the past really lost for good?  Dive in to find out what happens!

With a quirky cast, drama, and secrets, Remember Me? makes a splash as a beachside read!  If you fancy some more Kinsella books, I highly recommend checking out Can You Keep a Secret? and The Undomestic Goddess. 


Stella Bain by Anita Shreve

stella bainBook – This novel begins with a compelling mystery as the main character awakens in a field hospital in Marne, France during World War I, not knowing her name or anything about herself beyond what is evident from her British nursing uniform and her American accent. This beautifully written historical fiction has the reader rooting for the courageous nurse as she forges on with nursing the wounded, pursuing threads of her identity, and ultimately facing a court trial. The audiobook is narrated by Hope Davis, and her pleasant, soothing voice matches Shreve’s spare, graceful presentation of a tragic yet intriguing story revolving around the development of psychotherapy for victims of shocking events. The courage, generosity, and intellect of individuals who aid the victims of war and prejudice are highlighted in the telling of “Stella Bain’s” story. The historical setting also provides a nostalgic backdrop for a love story that develops sweetly during this hopeful tale of rebuilding. If you enjoy this book, the library collections contain numerous novels by this award-winning author.