My Real Children by Jo Walton

my realBook – Patricia Cowen is confused. “Very confused,” it says on her medical chart most days. She forgets things. But she remembers things, too. She remembers Michael telling her “It’s now or never” and saying “Now” and getting married and having his four children. She remembers Michael telling her “It’s now or never” and saying “Never” and traveling in Florence and raising three children with Bee. She isn’t sure which one of them is right, or if both of them are, but she’s sure it means something.

My Real Children is one of those novels that could only be written by Jo Walton. It’s science fiction insofar as it’s about one woman and two different lives she could have had, both of them in worlds that are not exactly our own. (The split occurs sometime in the early fifties, and history progresses in sometimes surprising ways.) But the real story, the point of the story, is about Patricia – Trish in one lifetime, Pat in the other – and her life and her family. It’s a little bit about might-have-beens, but more about the small choices that you make that make big differences, both to yourself and to other people. I loved it, and I can’t recommend it highly enough.

Grain Brain by David Perlmutter

GrainbrainBook – This book’s popularity is likely due to Dr. Perlmutter’s assertion that one’s genetic predisposition to mental aging is not set in stone, and that by altering our diets we can reduce the neurological degeneration that our parents and grandparents may have exhibited. Gluten free, low-sugar diets have become increasingly prevalent for a variety of reasons. In Grain Brain, Dr. Perlmutter shares compelling research linking gluten and sugar consumption to neurological degeneration such as that which occurs within dementia and Alzheimer’s patients. Dr. Perlmutter has the distinction of being both a neurologist and a nutritionist, and this book recounts incidences where a change in his patients’ diets alleviated symptoms from various neurological disorders. Grain Brain is also filled with references to other researchers’ studies on the impacts of elements such as “good fats” on the brain. His main premise is that all gluten sources are damaging to the brain, including whole grain sources. More easily digested is his confidence that the consumption of “healthy” fats found in fish, nuts, and eggs, will prolong the health of our brains. Grain Brain includes a 4-week plan of healthy eating and exercise. This book will obviously appeal to anyone who is already inclined to try a low-carb, or “Paleolithic” diet. However, proponents of a diet relying heavily on whole grains, as symbolized by the USDA Food Pyramid, have been less pleased with Dr. Perlmutter’s recommendations.

 

Still Alice by Lisa Genova

still aliceBook – Fifty-year-old Alice Howland is an accomplished Harvard psychology professor. A published author, traveling lecturer and beloved teacher, she is content with her life and work. But she begins to worry about her forgetfulness. She loses things, forgets words and then, one day when she’s out for a run, she doesn’t know where she is or how to get home. A visit to the doctor results in a devastating diagnosis: Alice has early onset Alzheimer’s disease. Alice, her husband and three grown children must cope with the ravages of the disease. This book is told from Alice’s perspective and gave me a sense of her growing confusion, panic and sadness as the disease progressed. She tries to live in the moment, but also recognizes and mourns the loss of the life and memories that meant so much to her. Still Alice also deals with the varying reactions of her family, friends and colleagues as they struggle to address and accept the changes in Alice.