The Luminous Dead by Caitlin Starling

Book – Gyre is determined to get off the mining planet she grew up on and to find her mother, who disappeared years ago. The easiest way to do that is as a caver, exploring the depths of the planet to find new sites for the mining companies that run the world. But caving is dangerous, so rather than take the time to build up a proper career and risk dying before she gets a chance to get out, Gyre’s faked her CV and signed on to one big job that should pay her enough to get offworld as soon as she’s done. Of course, there’s a reason this job pays so much, and it’s certainly not because it’s a normal caving expedition.

I never expected a novel about one person alone in a cave, sometimes talking with one person on the surface but sometimes not, to be so emotional. Gyre is a terrific character, stubborn and foolhardy and paranoid, and I was cheering her on even as I was cursing her terrible decisions. While the novel starts out almost like a horror novel, the deeper Gyre goes into the mystery of why she’s been sent into this particular cave and what happened there, the more the broader universe of mining corporations and alien predators – not to mention Gyre’s developing relationship with her handler, the woman who hired her for this expedition – comes into play. I adored The Luminous Dead and I can’t wait to see what Caitlin Starling does next.

Venom (2018)

Film – I’m not normally one for the superhero action films, but I made an exception for the 2018 release Venom.  First, it features the hunky Tom Hardy as the lead, which is always a valid reason to see a film.  Second, the visualization of Venom himself looked amazing in the trailers, encompassing everything I so love about creature features and sci-fi stories.

Journalist Eddie Brock knows that something sinister is going on at Life Foundation, and he’ll stop at nothing to find out what Carlton Drake is hiding in his laboratory behind closed doors.  Disaster strikes, and Eddie suddenly finds himself host to a symbiotic alien, Venom.  With his powerful and demanding alter ego, Eddie continues searching for answers, fighting for his own survival.  Carlton Drake is a far more dangerous villain than Eddie could have ever imagined, and he must join forces with Venom to try to save the world.  With a truly unexpected superhero, amazing depiction of venom, and humor a bit reminiscent of Deadpool, I highly recommend this film.  The bond forged between Eddie and Venom is dynamic, a real treat to see.

Waiting on a long list to get the Venom DVD from our library?  Check out a Roku Streaming Player and avoid the line!  You can stream Venom and hundreds of other free movies and tv shows all on one device!  All you need is a TV, monitor or laptop, 2 AAA batteries (not included) and a Wireless Internet Connection.  Visit the Member Services Desk for more information.  Look at our Warrenville Library Mobile Menu for a complete list of all our Mobile Devices available for check-out.

The Sparrow by Mary Doria Russell

Book – An undeniably alien communication is received on Earth. While governments bicker and argue about what to do next, the Jesuits quietly fund their own miniature space program, designed to send one small group of scientists and missionaries to the signal’s source, to see what they can find. It goes…about as well as first contacts with Jesuit missionaries traditionally goes: fine, until it isn’t, and then it’s horrible.

This is the story of Father Emilio Sandoz, priest and scientist, heretic and – perhaps – saint, who went to another world to meet the people there and suffered terribly for his mistakes. The story is told largely in flashback, as Sandoz is interviewed by the Vatican to determine exactly what went wrong with the mission and who is to blame. So even though large portions of the book are really very happy and cheerful, there’s an ominous cloud hanging over the whole as we wait to find out just what went so terribly wrong. It’s also a story about good intentions: how much having them can and can’t make a difference, and how we apportion blame for things we wish had never happened.

Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. Corey

Leviathan Wakes by James S.A. CoreyBook – Anyone who’s been regretting a shortage of great sci-fi movies lately can find consolation in the Expanse series by James S.A. Corey (the pseudonym for the duo of Daniel Abraham and Ty Franck). In the first volume, Leviathan Wakes, we’re introduced to the solar system as it will be. Earth is an aging power, Mars a powerful colony, and the Belt – the thinly-populated region of outer space that’s developed its own language, culture, and phenotype – well, the Belt just wants to be left alone. Tensions are high anyway, but they only get worse when Jim Holden of the late ice miner Canterbury accuses Mars of destroying his ship. Holden’s wrong, though. It wasn’t Mars. It was someone else – someone covering up a secret that no one would have guessed.

Corey is terrific at making books out of nothing but awesome things. If you’re in the market for space battles, unnameable horrors, down-on-their-luck cops, and the unstoppable force of a dedicated optimist meeting the immovable object of human politics, Leviathan Wakes is the book for you – and if you like this, there are two more books already available and three more in the works.