Poorly Drawn Lines by Reza Farazmand

Graphic Novel – What happens when a bear named Ernesto brings a friend home? They die of course! Not because the bear mauled them, but because Ernesto lives in space and no one can breathe in space. Except Ernesto of course! Poorly Drawn Lines is a collection of comics with a few situations/short stories sprinkled throughout. Created by Reza Farazmand, Reza began drawing this comic while in college.

There is really no summary to give except the comics it will make you laugh or question your place in the universe. Other topics include ghosts, absurd gun violence, bird bullying, and animal drug abuse. The reader need not follow any order. All the comics are conclusive. There are reoccurring characters like Ernesto the green bear, but most of them are not given names. The comics are heavy with sarcasm, illogical scenarios, and absurdity. If you are looking for a very quick read with this type of wit, this is the book for you. If you do not like this humor, then stay away.

I am a fan of dark, sarcastic humor and enjoyed this book. Sometimes we all need to find a way to shed our daily stress and decompress. What better way to do this than by reading a comic about a suspicious box, or a stressed out hamster question your own existence. One more thing do not skip over the short stories in between the comics. They are a little bizarre, but may give you a good chuckle.

Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn

41-rjgGUB5L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Book–Ella Minnow Pea (LMNOP) lives with her family on the fictional island of Nollop, just off the coast of South Carolina. On the island nation founded by Nevin Nollop, supposed creator of the pangram “The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog,” Nollopian citizens are proud of their wordy heritage and communicate in a sesquipedalian style that makes their letters a fun, dictionary-requiring read. In the center of town, there is a memorial to Nevin Nollop, including his famous sentence. The plot begins when one letter falls off of the statue: the letter “Z.” Rather than re-affixing the letter to the monument and moving on, the island Council chooses to interpret this as a divine sign from Nollop, and bans this letter from Nollop’s written and spoken discourse. While “Z” is no great loss, the Nollopian’s rationalize, and dutifully eliminate it, they are less sanguine when more letters begin to fall from the statue and accordingly, from their language, turning their society of free expression into one of censorship, fear, and constrained liberties.

Considered as a novel, Ella Minnow Pea is weak–the characterization is broad and the world-building is vague. As a fable in the vein of Animal Farm, though, it is great fun, and as a linguistic experiment, it’s even better. This book will appeal to people who love children’s books like The Phantom Tollbooth and The Lost Track of Time and were craving an adult version of books that have so much fun with the English language.