The Atomic Weight of Love by Elizabeth Church

25810606Book – Seventeen-year-old Meridian Wallace is a bright, energetic woman and the only child of doting parents. Her parents encourage her curiosity and academic pursuits. She starts college at the University of Chicago in 1941 to pursue her degree in ornithology, the study of birds. She falls in love with a brilliant physics professor, Alden Whetstone. He’s more than twenty years her senior, and she is attracted to his intelligence and their stimulating scientific conversations. When he is tapped to work at Los Alamos on a top secret project, Meridian follows him and postpones her acceptance to grad school for a year. She marries Alden and begins an independent study of crows. As the years go by, Meridian continues to submerge her own desires and dreams to accommodate Alden’s career. She finds companionship in some of the other women and then, in the 1970’s meets Clay, who introduces her to new experiences and encourages her independence. This book fascinated me with its depictions of the changing times and society’s expectations, particularly toward women. I sometimes hoped that Meridian would make different choices, but thought that her struggles and decisions were realistic. This book is an engaging, thought-provoking read.

Designing Your Life by Bill Burnett and Dave Evans

1101875321.01._SX450_SY635_SCLZZZZZZZ_Book – I’ve been hearing about Stanford’s life design course for a few years now, one of those bits of news that makes me nostalgic for being in college. Run through Stanford’s Institute of Design, it teaches students how to develop a life they will enjoy to the fullest, using design mindsets and principles. It sounds terrific – and the class has been full every year for nine years.

Well, for those of us who no longer have any hope of getting into a Stanford class, waitlisted or not, the course designers have written a book. It’s not the same – you’ll need to develop your own group of peers, and you’re probably starting from a very different place than a college junior or senior – but it’s a great start. After introducing the basic concepts, the book dives right into exercises you can try (based on one of the five core design principles, bias to action, or as the authors put it: Try Stuff). If you want the full schoolwork experience, you can even download worksheets from their website.

There isn’t a lot of direct advice in this book – the authors aren’t trying to get you to do anything specific with your life, but to think differently about your life and the choices you make about it. Maybe that means making a few small changes so that you appreciate what you have all the more; maybe it means quitting your job and moving to Alaska. Either way, a few hours spent with this book would be a great way to kick off the new year.

Shameless: Season 1 (2011)

indexTV Series – Just as the name says, this show is Shameless. A story about a family that does everything they need to make ends meet. A father with a drinking problem and no job, six siblings ranging from mid-twenties to under a year, and neighbors and friends that do their best to help where and when they can.

The shows centers around the Gallaghers, a dysfunctional family with a lot of problems and a lot of heart.  Frank (William H Macy) is an alcoholic determined never to work a day in his life. Ironic that he works so hard at trying not to work. Fiona (Emmy Rossum) keeps the family in line and afloat doing everything she can to make sure the bills get paid and there is food on the table. Lip and Ian are the next in line trying to stay in school and help out where they can. The younger branch of the family is Debbie, Carl and little Liam. They also do their part to help out with family responsibilities.

Shameless is very raw and depicts a lot of hard/ harsh situations. Though a comedy, Shameless has a lot of everyday drama. Using a chair to keep the washing machine door from opening because there is no money to buy a new one. Taking every odd job out their just to put food on the table. Sending your sister to school with her baby brother for show and tell because there is no babysitter and everyone has things to do. This is what I mean by every day drama. It may not be the drama you’re used to, but this is the reality for some. The Gallaghers struggle, but work together to get things done and compromise at every turn to make sure they survive to fight another day.

There is a lot of swearing, nudity, alcohol, and drug abuse. If this is not your thing, I would steer away from this one. But for people who can relate to harsh family upbringings, family resilience, and not take yourself to serious then I would check this out. The show takes place on the south side of Chicago. Shameless is ending its seventh season this December.

The Hating Game: A Novel by Sally Thorne

indexBookThe Hating Game by Sally Thorne has such an intriguing title that I had to pick it up.  Introducing…Lucy and Joshua, two people who absolutely despise each other.  Lucy hates Josh’s cold, unfeeling personality and the starchness of his always perfect wardrobe.  Joshua hates Lucy’s quirky positive demeanor and colorfully wacky sense of style.

Unfortunately for this pair of arch-nemeses, Joshua and Lucy not only work in the same publishing office, they’re forced to share the same cubicle.  Lucy can’t think of anything worse in her life than having to see and work with Joshua every day.  Just to get through their time together, Lucy and Joshua play a series of childish games, like the staring game: maintain eye contact until the other one cracks a smile, or breaks down in tears.  Fun stuff, right?

When a promotion looms on the horizon, it is Lucy against Joshua in a fight of sabotage and power to get to the top.  Lucy promises herself that if Joshua becomes her boss in the promotion, she’ll quit on the spot.  But something begins to change between these rivals, something that’s slowly turning their hatred into something…new.  Suddenly their silly games fall by the wayside, opening up to something real that neither of them could ever imagine.  Full of comedy, ridiculous hate-filled staring games, and so much more, The Hating Game is a perfectly crafted tale of opposites attract and competitive angst.

My True Love Gave to Me: Twelve Holiday Stories edited by Stephanie Perkins

51N8TdfrZ6L._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_Book–Looking for a light, frothy read over the holidays? My True Love Gave to Me is the collection for you. Including stories from some of the biggest authors in the young adult literature world, these stories will appeal equally to young adults and adults looking for a clean read. I enjoyed all of the stories in this collection, but some of my favorites were “Midnights” by Rainbow Rowell, where we follow two best friends over a series of New Years Eves until they fall in love, “Your Temporary Santa” by David Levithan, where the main character’s boyfriend dresses up as Santa to surprise the main character’s sibling, and ” Angels in the Snow” by Matthew De La Pena, about a lonely young man who is stuck cat-sitting far away from his family over Christmas. This collection spans genres from realistic fiction to fantasy, so there should be a story here for everyone.

If  you enjoyed this collection, you’ll be pleased to know that there is also a version to entertain you this summer: Summer Days and Summer Nights, also edited by Perkins, brings 12 more stories by twelve different authors with a similar seasonal theme. Not only that, but if you really liked any of the stories, consider checking out the authors’ novels!  We have plenty of them here at the Library.

Simple Matters: Living with Less and Ending Up with More by Erin Boyle

c7b97d8683a411e396e179ea853485c6BookSimple Matters is about making a home. “The simple decisions and practices and objects and habits that make up the backdrop of our tumultuous lives….based on the premise that a simple home is filled with hardworking things.” It’s divided into nine chapters, including Decluttering, Bath & Beauty, Cooking & Entertaining and Cleaning. Boyle is a blogger and photographer who has moved with her husband and child into five apartments in the last ten years. The process of moving helped her prioritize her possessions and streamline her processes. I like her approach to a simpler, more thoughtful, more engaged lifestyle. She gives practical suggestions and creative solutions that are economical and simple. The format and illustrations of the book were appealing. I feel inspired to reexamine my possessions and habits toward achieving a simpler, more fulfilling life.

Bitter Seeds by Ian Tregillis

6881685Book – Klaus and his sister Gretel were sold to the Doctor when they were children, and ten years later, after innumerable surgeries, experiments, and hours of training, they and their companions are the secret weapons of the rising Reich. Klaus can walk, insubstantial, through walls or hails of bullets with equal ease; his rival can burst into flames at will; and his sister Gretel’s powers, though less dramatic, are no less important, because she can see the future consequences of all their actions.

Meanwhile, across the Channel, the British Secret Service has formed an even-more secret organization called Milkweed to figure out how to combat the German supersoldiers whose existence they’ve stumbled upon. Raybould Marsh, an up-and-coming SIS agent, recruits his old friend William Beauclerk, the younger brother of a Duke and, more importantly, one of Britain’s secret network of warlocks, able to negotiate favors from impossibly powerful beings with control over the very fabric of reality.

Nazi supermen versus British warlocks — Bitter Seeds (the first book in the Milkweed Trilogy) is like a comic book movie in novel form, in the best possible way. While the Nazi doctor sometimes falls into cartoon-villain territory, Klaus and Gretel more than make up for it, and the machinations of the British warlocks are mesmerizing in their horribleness. This is a dark alternate history (although perhaps no darker than World War II actually was) where everybody makes terrible choices in the service of winning the war, without stopping to think about what will happen if they do.

If you like Marvel’s Captain America movies or the X-Men in any form, do yourself a favor and pick this up. Another great alternate-World War II novel is Jo Walton’s Farthing, an English country house mystery set during the long peace between Britain and Nazi Germany.

Love Actually (2003)

love-actually-dvd-coverMovie- A story of love at Christmas time. Love Actually intertwines 9 mini stories of new love, lost love, forbidden love, and young love. A few of the integrating stories are of the newly elected British Prime Minister falling for his junior staffer, a man who is in love with his best friends new wife, a young boy that has found his first epic love, a man who is dealing with the death of his wife, a married man and his new young attractive secretary, and a woman who is heavily involved with her mentally ill little brother has a complicated love life.

Although it is a movie you need to watch all the way thru from the beginning the first time to keep the stories straight, it truly is one of my favorite Christmas movies ever. Its not a traditional holiday movie in the sense that it is not religious, and not about Santa Clause either. Its about the feeling of Christmas, and the setting is the holiday season. I will say Love Actually is a little chick flick like, but I did find it interesting to see the aspects of British culture through out the sets and language.

All the Little Lights by Passenger

All-the-little-lightsMusic– I’ve recently begun expanding my collection of folky-alternative, easy listening music.  My first soft-spoken love was The Fray, followed by Coldplay, and the sweet acoustics of Mumford and Sons I’d been binging on the beautiful angst of  Ed Sheeran for awhile and knew it was time for a fresh sound.

Enter: All the Little Lights by Passenger.

Singer Michael David Rosenberg hails from Brighton, England and All the Little Lights is his third solo album.  His music has an indie-pop vibe mixed with a mellowing dose of acoustic folk (At least, that’s how I would describe it).  There is a certain intimacy about his music, a solo singer who produces his own acoustics, and for this reason (I’ve been told), his live performances are incredible.

Passenger is probably best known for the hit single, “Let Her Go,” but feel like his  other tracks are often overlooked due to the popularity of this one song.  A few of my favorite tracks on this album are: “Things That Stop You Dreaming” and “Holes.”  “Things that Stop You Dreaming” is about dealing with the difficulties in life, learning to appreciate what you have and continuing to pursue the things you love.  It’s a bit melancholy but also uplifting.

“Holes” is a quick paced  song with a strong beat that shows Passenger’s inclination towards lyrical songwriting.  There are two storylines introduced in “Holes”: man who has lost everything, left with no money in his pocket, and a woman abandoned by her husband, left to care for four young children.  The song talks about the holes we bear in our own lives–things we’ve lost, struggles we deal with, hardships–but ends on an uplifting note, that through all the troubles we experience, life goes on, and we carry on.

The Wit and Wisdom of Downtown Abbey

indexBookThe Wit and Wisdom of Downton Abbey is perfect as a small gift or stocking stuffer.  Known for beautiful costumes and settings, great characters, stories, and excellent writing – Jessica Fellowes has compiled some of her favorite quotes from the show.  The book is beautifully illustrated with color stills from the series.  Paging through it the reader will be reminded of some of the most memorable scenes and the personalities of the characters. It’s also interesting to experience all the social changes that happened over the six seasons.

Some of the best quotes are from Violet played splendidly by Maggie Smith.  “Have we all stepped through the looking glass?”, “Poor souls. It’s bad enough parenting a child when you like each other.”  Speaking to her grown son Robert: “When you talk like that I’m tempted to ring for Nanny and have you put to bed with no supper.”  And loving words between one of my favorite couples: Mrs. Hughes: “You can always hold my hand if you need to feel steady.” Carson: “I don’t know how, but you manage to make that sound a little risqué.”  This is just a small example of many, many more.  A fun little book that is truly witty and wise.

You may also like Behind the Scenes of Downton Abbey, The Chronicles of Downton Abbey, Downton Abbey: A Celebration, and The World of Downton Abbey.