All Is Not Forgotten by Wendy Walker

all-is-not-forgottenBook – Twelve-year-old Jenny Kramer was the victim of rape, a brutal, and violent assault, but she has no memory of the attack. That’s because Jenny’s parents made the decision to have doctors give Jenny a controversial new drug meant to erase all memory of the attack.  This novel deals with the aftermath of that decision, and Wendy Walker weaves in the effect that Jenny’s attack has on her parents, Charlotte and Tom Kramer, Inspector Parsons, and the mysterious unreliable narrator. I felt that Wendy Walker managed to introduce and delve into the backstories for countless characters without bogging the story down. If anything it made the story even richer.

I also loved the unreliable narrator and his place within the story. When I say I love the narrator, I mean how the character is written, the depth in which we are able to delve into who he is and his involvement in the story of Jenny Kramer. He is at times likable, other times despised, but I feel that all readers can at least agree that he elicits a strong reaction and has a unique existence within the book.

This is a dark and disturbing, yet completely immersing read that had me still pondering over it hours are reading.  I would warn potential readers that the description and details of Jenny’s rape are extremely graphic; it is a difficult read.

 

 

Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon by Michael P. Ghiglieri and Thomas M. Myers

indexBook – As I mentioned earlier this month, I’m fascinated by stories of wilderness adventures gone terribly, irrevocably wrong. Living in the suburbs it’s easy to forget the immensity of the natural world – and its unforgiving nature. As the authors of Over the Edge say, nature is not Disney World, and there’s no guarantee that the unprepared will make it out alive.

And not to be morbid, but this collection of stories about deaths in one of America’s most impressive natural features is fascinating stuff. While there are a fair number of suicides (although not as many as you might think), most of the deaths they talk about are the result of just that kind of lack of preparation – hikers, cavers, rafters who thought they could do more than they could, and found out too late that they were wrong. It’s a comprehensive catalog of things not to do, and anybody interested in hiking Grand Canyon probably ought to read this first, just to make sure they don’t get too cocky.

I stumbled upon this book after reading the fascinating saga of the discovery of the Death Valley Germans – a family of tourists who disappeared into the California desert in 1996, and whose remains were finally discovered by search & rescue volunteer Tom Mahood in 2010. From this and from Over the Edge, I have learned never to drive a minivan offroad in the desert, to always carry twice as much water as I think I’ll need, and also to stay far, far away from Death Valley.

I’m Just a Person by Tig Notaro

0062266632.01._SX450_SY635_SCLZZZZZZZ_Book – Tig is a stand-up comedian. She experienced a streak of devastating personal tragedies in 2012, including C-Diff, the death of her mother, the break-up of girlfriend and a stage 2 breast cancer diagnosis. She turned to comedy to channel her grief. The result was a set that went viral and was released as the album “Live,” which was nominated for a Grammy. In her book, Tig recounts her journey. The first chapter depicts her early life and unconventional upbringing and was my favorite chapter of the book. However, after a promising beginning, the book went flat for me. Tig states her feelings, then gives examples, rather than illuminating truths through the story. Other memoirs I have read have been better at conveying difficult character traits of people in their lives, while also managing to express their redeeming qualities. Although I didn’t particularly enjoy this book, I admire Tig for overcoming the adversity she was confronted with and for sharing her personal story through stand-up comedy.

When Bunnies Go Bad: A Pru Marlowe Pet Noir by Clea Simon

indexBook – With a title like When Bunnies Go Bad, author Clea Simon had me hooked on her newest mystery novel immediately.  The brown, furry rabbit on the cover didn’t hurt.  I pictured a story of a once friendly and adorable creature wreaking havoc on an poor, unsuspecting town.

Instead, this novel follows Pru, a woman with secrets to hide, mainly her identity as an animal psychic.  In her small hometown, people know only that Pru seems to have a way with animals.  From pests to pets, Pru is friend and trainer to all creatures.  When Pru discovers the body of a rich vacationer, she can’t stand by and let the feds handle the case.  With her special skills, Pru manages to get inside information on the murder, specifically from the deceased’s beautiful young girlfriend and her tiny pup.

I enjoyed learning about Pru’s backstory, and the origins of her gift.  I liked the concept of this animal psychic crime solver, but I found the story to be a little jumbled, and confusing.  However, as a whole I enjoyed this cute “cozy” mystery.

When Bunnies Go Bad is part of the “Pru Marlowe Pet Noir mystery series,” which also includes other fun titles such as Kittens Can Kill, and Parrots Prove Deadly. What’s not to love?

 

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl Vol. 1: Squirrel Power

23732096Book–“Squirrel Girl, Squirrel Girl! She’s a human and also squirrel! Can she climb up a tree? Yes she can, easily.” It is necessary to begin a review of the Squirrel Girl graphic novel with the Squirrel Girl Theme song. It’s totally “not” similar in tune to the Spiderman Theme song at all.

Squirrel Girl aka Doreen Green, the adorable college student with the proportional speed and strength of squirrel, begins her own series by taking down some bad guys (while singing) and then starting her first day of college. Doreen, along with her sidekick and best friend, Tippy-Toe (an actual squirrel) deal with normal trials in life: homework, finding new friends, and defeating evil villains out to destroy the world. Totally normal.

What I love about Squirrel Girl graphic novel series is its ability to make me smile and laugh while reading it. Doreen is a great lead character. You get to see her struggle through her first day of college and then fight some villains afterwards. She has spirit, spunk, and loves everybody she meets. She is not your typical superhero and that is why I love her and her writers so much! Doreen does things her way.

So if you are looking for something fun to read this week. Check out the Squirrel Girl series! We have volumes 1-3 with more on their way. Squirrel Power!!

Wild Ideas: Into the Wild and The Wild Truth

Books – It’s summertime, and what better time to read about people dying alone in the wilderness. Right? No? Just me then. I’m not a camping person, and maybe that’s why I’ve always been fascinated by stories of outdoors adventures going horribly wrong. It’s safely scary: while it’s real, I can be comfortably certain that I will never starve to death in the Alaskan wilderness, because there is no way I would be there in the first place.

indexBut somehow I’d never read Jon Krakauer’s classic Into the Wild, about Chris McCandless, a young man who trekked across the country alone, then survived more than a hundred days in central Alaska, on his own with virtually no supplies other than what he could hunt or gather, before succumbing to the elements (and, Krakauer argues, some toxic potato seeds). I knew I had to read it, though, when I saw that Chris’s sister, Carine McCandless, had written her own memoir, The Wild Truth.

51hCNy79jIL._SX331_BO1,204,203,200_A lot of people, after reading Into the Wild or seeing the movie based on the book, thought of Chris as an irresponsible, immature kid, who never thought about what his disappearance would do to his family. Really, Carine says, their parents were physically and emotionally abusive, and Chris had tried over and over again to reconcile with them before cutting them out of his life completely just before embarking on his fatal trip – a hard, painful separation that Carine herself took decades later. She’d asked Krakauer not to write the truth about their parents in his book, hoping then that her relationship with them could still be saved. The two books together are a powerful story about how our families shape our relationships with ourselves and the rest of the world, and the lengths people will go to when they need to escape that influence.

Summertime Nostalgia

Movies – Summertime brings back memories baseball, adventures, mischief, and family vacations. It’s a time for wondering the woods, going to water parks, hanging out with friends, and first loves/crushes. Here are some movies to help get that nostalgia feeling back.

5166BKF2PFLMy number one favorite summertime film is The Sandlot. A group of neighborhood kids playing baseball all day long, or until they lose the ball for that day. These kids didn’t have a care in the world accept playing baseball, being kids, and enjoying summer. That is until they hit a special ball into the yard of “the beast”. They will do everything they can to get it back. “You’re killing me smalls!”

51Q041CWDEL._SY445_Next classic is Stand by Me. Four boys go off on an adventure to locate a dead body. Not very summery of a topic, but it is an adventure. This is what kids do… to some point. They go off in search of adventures and end up discovering things about themselves and their friends. What better time in one’s life to go on adventures! As a kid we would go down to our local train tracks and look for tadpoles and snails. Stand by Me is a classic which will always remind me of precarious summertime adventure.

794043492624;size=m2Now and Then is a story about four girls and the summer that brought them closer. The movie opens in a cemetery with the girls trying to summon a spirit. The girls are also trying to raise money to buy a tree house. The films flashbacks between the girls as adults and teens. It is a great film for everyone. Personally, I never tried to summon a spirit via a cemetery because there were no cemeteries nearby, but it sounds like something my friends and I would have done.

Summer is a great time for everyone to learn, live, laugh, and love. I recommend watching some on these movies before summers end and reliving your summertime memories with your loved ones.

Britt-Marie Was Here by Fredrik Backman

indexBook – Britt-Marie is in her 60’s, socially awkward and incapable of tolerating a mess. She has just left her husband, Kent, and is looking for a job. After haranguing the young unemployment officer, she lands a temporary position in the tiny, down-on-its-luck town of Borg as a caretaker of the recreation center. As she arrives into town, she is surprised to discover that the residents, particularly the children, are fixated on soccer. The children practice without a coach and proper playing field. Britt-Marie compulsively cleans their uniforms, as well as the recreation center and adjoining shop. Despite her very definite views on proper conduct (and correcting everyone’s lack of it), Britt-Marie finds that she is accepted and understood for the first time in her life. The story unfolds with hilarious antics and heart-rending moments. I loved these characters and their town. As stated in the book, “At a certain age almost all the questions a person asks him or herself are really just about one thing: how should you live your life?” Britt-Marie is finally able to figure out the answer for herself, as she learns to live life on her own terms.

Spin by Robert Charles Wilson

indexBook – One day the stars go out. A mysterious membrane has encircled the Earth, and the only thing that gets in is sunlight. And then it’s discovered that the membrane doesn’t just seal the Earth off in space, but also in time, and eons are passing in the rest of the galaxy to every Earth minute. The story of the panicked Earth is told by Tyler Dupree, childhood friend of genius and technology heir Jason Lawton, who will eventually construct a space program dedicated to divining the mystery of the Spin membrane and the Hypotheticals who put it there. Isaac becomes a doctor, and is hired as Jason’s personal physician, a position that lets him watch the whole thing go spiraling out of control.

Science fiction with big ideas often suffers from unrealistic or just uninteresting characters, but I never had that problem with Spin. Tyler, Jason, and Jason’s twin sister Diane are all complex people with deep personal connections in addition to their role in helping the world recover the global disaster that is the Spin – Jason and Diane both push against their politically powerful father, E.D., in different ways, while Tyler is hyper-aware of his position relative to them: he’s the son of their family’s housekeeper. The way their personal dramas play out on a global, even a galactic, scale parallels the accelerated timeline of the Earth under the Spin.

The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly by Stephanie Oakes

41350y21tlL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_Book–How do you think you would react if you found out everything you knew about truth and life was a lie? That your parents where duped by a man with a silver tongue. That the world outside is not as evil as you were lead to believe. Meet Minnow Bly. For most of her life she grew up a Kevinian, a cult led by the “Prophet” Kevin. Life as Kevinian is not easy. Everyone lives in the woods, isolated from the world. The men take multiple wives in order to have lots of children. And people who leave or cause problems are punished, severely. Minnow herself lost both of her hands by the order of the Prophet.

But now the Prophet is dead and the Community burned to the ground. The FBI want to know what happened, but Minnow does not want to tell them the truth. Telling the truth means going back to that night. Telling the truth means revealing secrets. Maybe some secrets are meant to be kept quiet.

The Sacred Lies of Minnow Bly is a quick read filled with mystery and intrigue. It also brings up themes of religion and questions about God. But it is mostly a book about a young girl finding her own way. It is about discovery, first love, and friendship. It is also a great read that you will not soon forget.