Legion (2017)

TV Series – David Haller knows what his problem is. He has schizophrenia. He’s doing much better in the institution, but it’s a pretty boring life, until Sydney shows up. She doesn’t like to be touched, doesn’t like people getting to close to her at all. Soon she and David fall in love. But on the day Sydney leaves the institution, something explosive and incomprehensible happens — something that makes it clear that David’s problem isn’t schizophrenia, it’s that he’s a mutant with superpowers, and he’s going to have to learn to control them before someone else does it for him.

Legion is a terrifically artistic TV show based on a character from the X-Men comics. While it’s produced by Marvel Studios and connected to the current X-Men movie franchise, you don’t have to have seen anything else to understand it — the characters are probably more confused than you are. The first couple of episodes use a very non-linear structure to put you in David’s head: it takes a long time to figure out when now is and exactly what that means. But it’s a terrific ride getting there, and unlike some shows that pay more attention to their aesthetics than their story, it’s never frustrating or too hard to follow. Legion packs a lot of story into an eight-episode season, and it’s tremendously binge-worthy.

Season Two of Legion just finished airing on FX this summer, and the show has already been renewed for a third season.

Cacti and Succulents Galore!: Great Books to Get You Started on Your Next Gardening Project

Books – As someone who’s recently become cactus-obsessed, our library’s collection of related gardening books has been a life-saver. I logically anticipated a plant massacre, due to my lack of green thumb. My first 3 cacti (who survived a rocky road trip from California to Illinois) have flourished, and I currently have 17 cacti and succulents. I’m a bit of an addict. The following books helped me learn how to properly care for these often finicky plants, and I recommend them to any cacti newbies.

Happy Cactus : Cacti, Succulents, and More by John Pilbeam

This is my favorite book of the bunch. The title is adorable; don’t we all want our cacti to be happy? I love love, LOVE this book. The photos, pictures, and huge variety of plants included in its pages is spectacular. Each plant has its own spread detailing physical characteristics, watering, soil, temperament, and vital statistics galore! It’s a great read to showcase a lot of the great varieties of cacti and succulents out there, and gave me inspiration for future purchases.

How to Train Your Cactus : A Guide to Raising Well-behaved Succulents by Tonwen Jones

A very cute book with beautiful illustrations. I also love this title because I feel like I do have to train my plants in a sense. I have to train them to accept the light they are provided, and be friendly with all of their many plant friends in my collection. This book details each plant with brief description and then delves into “training notes.”

How to Window Box : Small-space Plants to Grow Indoors or Out by Chantal Aida Gordon

This book is great for those who don’t have a lot of space or light to properly care for plants. Window boxing is a fun and crafty way to still have the garden you’ve always wanted! If nothing else, the photos alone are Instagram worthy and great inspiration!

 

 

 

 

Three Wishes by Liane Moriarty

Book – Approaching their thirty-third birthdays, the Kettle sisters Lyn, Cat, and Gemma reminisce about the chaotic past year.  Including pregnancy, a love affair, a mid-life crisis, and the possible reconciliation of their divorced parents. Three Wishes tells the zany story of the triplets – two identical, one fraternal, who celebrate each year with their own cake and candle(s), thus they each make a wish.

What starts out as a festive evening ends up in a chaotic brawl in a restaurant in Sydney.  The beginning will have you hooked, since you will want to know why the pregnant sister has a fondue fork sticking out of her belly.

Lyn who has it all together and is very organized begins having debilitating panic attacks.  Cat thinks she has the perfect marriage until her husband announces that he is having an affair with a younger woman. Gemma tends to have short term relationships with men and her jobs have even a briefer duration.  If she wasn’t a house sitter, then she would probably be homeless.

This is Moriarty’s first novel and it is a candid look at a trio that has an unshakeable bond that is as wonderful as it is frustrating.  Funny, sincere, and wise with a touch of sibling rivalry – this is an enjoyable read.  Netflix has plans to make this a series.

Craeft by Alexander Langlands

Book – Before the modern era, before the Industrial Revolution, before mass production and manufacturing, most everything humans did was a matter of craft (or, to use the archaic spelling, Craeft) – a combination of skill, thriftiness, ingenuity, and necessity. In this book, Alexander Langlands explores some of the components of craeft from historic England, reflecting on the skills and resources involved and the way all the various components of the landscape interact with one another.

Langlands had my dream job: he was an experimental archaeologist, using the tools and techniques of history to better understand the way the past worked. He was clearly in this job by temperament as much as anything, because throughout this book he displays a remarkable curiosity about not just the individual components of historic life but the whole system of the thing: the way one skill led into another, one craft creating byproducts that in turn become the core structural elements of another. He calls this kind of systemic, interdependent thinking “craeftiness,” a mode of relating to the world that abhors waste the way nature abhors a vacuum, finding a clever, economical use for every scrap, and making every expenditure of energy do at least two jobs.

This isn’t your ordinary history book; in fact, I’m hard-pressed to find anything to compare it to. It’s deeply personal, each chapter (focusing on a different craft, from haymaking to basket-weaving to wall and barrow building) exploring Langlands’ own experience with the skill as well as his archaeological knowledge of its history. It’s profoundly location-based, as suits a book about the way pre-industrial people lived. And, crucially, it’s not nostalgic or romanticizing of the past: Langlands is well aware of how hard all this work is, having done much of it himself, albeit without life-or-death consequences. What he’s explaining is not just these individual skills that have been lost in the wake of cheap petroleum-based energy, but a way of thinking that was lost along with them, one which might become necessary in the near future, as petroleum-based energy becomes not so cheap.

The Commuter (2018)

DVD- Ex Cop Michael now works in selling life insurance. He takes the commuter train to the city to his ho hum day every day. One day on the train he is approached by an odd passenger, Joanna, with a puzzle for him to solve. He is in need of some cash to continue his lifestyle with his family, and if he solves this puzzle correctly and quickly he is given the cash. He needs to find this one person with a package and obtain the package before they get to stop x on the trip. He has just a few stops to solve the puzzle. Of course Joanna is not a “good guy” and has eyes on him at all times through various ways throughout the trip. Will he solve the mystery, save lives, and get the money?

Liam Neeson is the lead in this role. He is unfortunately a typecast for this role. It is very similar to many of his other movies. This one was set to be a great movie, the preview looked amazing. I was interested in this one, cause who doesn’t love the typical Liam Neeson movie? This one was more over the top than his usual. I think there were too many plot holes, and way too many special effects clumped together. If you are looking for an action packed just for the heck of it movie, this is it. But don’t expect to walk out after the movie feeling “Wow, that was amazing! I can’t believe…..” I walked out saying “Ok, Huh, I saw it. Now what?”.

The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid

Book – Some books ripen in a certain season, and The Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo is a perfect summer book to me: gossipy, escapist and propulsive, but not lacking in substance.  It’s been months since I’ve been in the mood to read fiction, but Evelyn is so addictive that I gobbled my way through its 400 pages in less than a day, and resented the hours when it had to be out of my hand.

The novel’s title character is a household name, a beloved film star whose career began in the 1950s and who is now (in roughly the present) setting her affairs in order.  Most pressingly, that means offering her first interview in decades to a young reporter named Monique who doesn’t understand why she is Evelyn’s hand-picked choice–and is even more astonished when Evelyn tells her that she has been chosen not as an interviewer, but to write Evelyn’s authorized biography.  Monique’s sections in the present alternate with (and are utterly eclipsed by) Evelyn’s first-person recollections of her eventful past, including the true story behind those seven spouses–and the secret eighth.

Evelyn Hugo is a ‘popcorn book,’ to be sure, wrapped in the glitz and glamor of Hollywood and more focused on entertaining its audience than stretching their minds.  But that doesn’t mean that it avoids deeper topics–especially identity, and the ways we shape, obscure, invent, discard, forget and rediscover parts of ourselves.  It’s historical but very timely, touching on questions of race, gender, sexuality, class, abuse, and what it means to grow up and grow old.  It’s a book about the compromises we make to have what we want and to be seen as who we want to be, and I highly recommend it for your next quick summer read.

Black Panther (2018)

DVD- T’Challa returns to his birth place in Wakanda, Africa to take his place as king since his father has recently passed away.  With being king, also comes the power of the Black Panther. This is an ancsestorial super power passed from generation to generation. As far as the world knows, Wakanda is a poor barely surviving country in Africa. If you look under the invisible cloaking net that has protected this country for centuries, you will find a very wealthy, technology advanced society that is sitting on a mountain of vibranium. Vibranium was used to make Captain America’s shield, and was thought to have been wiped out of existence after. After Klaue and Killmonger learn of this metals existence again they will stop at nothing to get it and make a massive weapon.

I found this movie very well done. Black Panther is a man of pride, strength, and honor. The setting of Wakanda is absolutely stunning, and although they have way more than is needed to survive as a country, they are not boastful in its uses. The colors, music, special effects, and just overall getting lost in the movie all made me feel WOW at the end. Even if you do not follow all the Marvel superheroes, you will still understand the vast majority of this movie. I absolutely recommend this to everyone!

Close Your Eyes by Amanda Eyre Ward

Book – When she was six years old, Lauren’s mother was murdered, her father arrested for the crime. Lauren’s brother Alex has always been convinced that their father is innocent, but Lauren doesn’t buy it. She remembers seeing something – she’s not sure what, but it was bad – and she trusts her memory. But when Alex disappears during a tour in Iraq with Doctors Without Borders, Lauren is forced to come to grips with her memories, her father, and her family’s history. Meanwhile, a pregnant young woman has left her boyfriend, hoping to reunite with her best friend — but she, too, has childhood memories that have yet to be resolved.

I enjoyed this psychological thriller about the unreliability of childhood memories. The characters are not always sympathetic, but they’re well-drawn and intriguing. This isn’t really a fast-paced thriller; the story moves from one point to another in the abrupt staccato way of memories itself. While the point of view shifts can be a little disorienting to start with, the whole story weaves itself together in the end in a most satisfying way.

No Regrets!: Temporary Tattoo Art for the Indecisive

Books – Tattoos can be intimidating, choosing a design that’s going to be ingrained on your skin for years and years to come; it’s more than a little scary, considering the involvement of stabbing needles.  Welcome to the world of DIY temporary tattooing!  No pain involved, easy to remove, but still a way to showcase your creativity in body art.  Temporary tattoos remind me of childhood, picking out a fun design, perhaps a pirate, or festive holiday image.  Now, there are so many more options in temporary tattooing for all ages, many conveniently found in the following books!

They both include templates in the back that you can scan to a computer and use to to create your own tattoos via special transfer paper.  It’s just like the tattoos I used when I was younger!  They recommend websites and different types of tattoo transfer paper to buy, and have a lot of good recommendations for the application and care of your temporary works of art.
With so many different types of mediums and application, there’s something for everyone.  Some are only meant for a night, a fun party costume that isn’t going to keep its composure for an extended period.  Then there are longer lasting art techniques like Henna, and the transfer printed tattoos.  I’ve experimented with henna before, both on the skin and as a natural hair dye.  It’s tricky to pipe out the intricate designs, but after allowing the henna to dry on your skin and washing it off, it’s amazing to enjoy the art as it lasts.

The Murderbot Diaries by Martha Wells

Books – A rogue SecUnit is one of the most terrifying things imaginable: a part-living, mostly-machine entity designed for security applications, without a working governor module, free to kill and destroy at will, and unstoppable by human agency.

The narrator of All Systems Red is technically a rogue SecUnit. It hacked its governor module, but instead of going on a murderous rampage, mostly it keeps doing its job and watches media in its downtime. (It particularly enjoys Sanctuary Moon.) That is, until a neighboring science mission goes dark and the humans SecUnit has been assigned to protect are threatened. SecUnit (who also calls itself Murderbot, although never out loud) doesn’t particularly like interacting with humans, but it doesn’t want them to die. After all, if all the humans died, who would make the media?

The Murderbot Diaries are short science-fiction thrillers, full of corporate espionage and underhanded dealings, but the real joy of them is watching Murderbot try to figure out how to be a person – because despite its continued insistence that it’s a bot, it’s one of the most intensely relateable characters I’ve ever met. (After all, who doesn’t want to spend long, boring shifts at work watching TV?) It struggles with human interaction, interactions with other bots, and how to handle personal responsibility, all while staying far enough under the radar to avoid being captured and reprogrammed. Artificial Condition follows Murderbot’s attempt to understand it’s own past (and its reluctant friendship with a science research transport). The series continues with Rogue Protocol in August and Exit Strategy in October.