Hemingway and Gellhorn (2012)

Movie - Hemingway and Gellhorn is HBO’s prestige movie featuring the tempestuous relationship between the two great writers Ernest Hemingway and Martha (“Marty”) Gellhorn.  Hemingway wrote 25 books and won the Nobel Prize, as well as a Pulitzer Prize. Marty Gellhorn is known as America’s greatest war correspondent, male or female. The movie is really about her and her amazing career. She liked to say “I do not see myself as a footnote to someone else’s life.”  In the late 1930s, she met Hemingway and the two of them traveled to Spain to cover the Spanish Civil War, and the movie uses black and while film to depict war scenes from that time. She and Hemingway lived together for four years (they were married in 1940; she was Ernest’s 3rd wife). Nicole Kidman is absolutely brilliant as Martha Gellhorn, but to me Clive Owen was not very convincing as Hemingway. The movie features a lot of sex, drinking and violence, but does not delve very deeply into the writing. However, Hemingway’s most famous book, For Whom the Bell Tolls, was inspired by Gellhorn. Hemingway and Gellhorn is set against a backdrop of the Spanish Civil War, and homes in Key West, Florida, the Finca Vigia in Cuba, and Ketchum, Idaho.

Reaper (2008)

reaperTV Series – When I was exploring the library collection for Halloween related material, I came across the comedy series Reaper. Reaper was a funny television series lasting two seasons, and after flying through it on DVD, I was disappointed to reach the end. The show’s main character Sam learned his parents had sold his soul to the Devil (played fabulously by Ray Wise), and Sam was forced to work as the Devil’s bounty hunter. Sam’s friends helped him out, and his sidekick Sock often stole the scene with idiosyncratic humor. Part of the fun of the series were the creative antics of Sam and his friends while they were at their day jobs at a big-box home store. The comedy also had romantic story-lines, and engaging mysteries threaded through the series. The show ended before all of these loose ends were tied up. This was due to the stalling of syndication talks, during which time the show’s stars were recruited to other projects. In a 2010 interview with CliqueClack TV, creators Fazekas and Butters revealed many of the unresolved plots from the series: How Reaper would have ended.

Homeland (2011)

homelandTV series – I was hooked on Homeland from the very first episode. Nicolas Brody (played by English actor Damian Lewis) is a marine returning to the United States and his family after eight years of captivity in Iraq. Carrie Mathison (Claire Danes), an Intelligence Officer for the CIA, spent several years in Iraq trying to infiltrate terrorist organizations. Both Brody and Carrie carry psychological scars from their experiences in the Middle East which continue to plague them. Carrie suspects that Brody may not be what he seems and has her own secrets to protect as well. The cast of interesting and conflicted characters, including Mandy Patinkin as Carrie’s boss and mentor, contributes to the depth and intrigue of the show. The plot twists and turns, the characters grapple with difficult choices and their own vulnerabilities and the result is a riveting TV drama. Season 2 has just been released on DVD. Since its first season aired in 2011, Homeland has won five Golden Globes.

Revenge (2011)

revengeTV – Revenge is my guilty pleasure. This is a TV series shrouded in mystery, glamor, and as the title suggests steeped in revenge.  The main character is Emily Thorne, who makes it her mission to infiltrate the Hampton’s upper society to execute a meticulous plot of revenge on Conrad and Victoria Grayson who set up her father, an executive working for their company, for channeling money to a terrorist organization responsible for the downing of a commercial airliner. Emily’s father was imprisoned for life and nine year old Emily was taken by the foster care system. She never saw her father again. Her childhood was spent consumed by rage, loss and betrayal.  Emily is highly intelligent and tough and she has no problem passing herself off as a philanthropic wealthy socialite to her neighbors the Graysons, as well as a romantic interest for their son, Daniel.  Revenge is full of intrigue, people you love to hate, endless twists and turns, not to mention beautiful people, clothes, and houses. The plot can be a little farfetched sometimes, but it is still wickedly entertaining.

Live Kisses

Live KissesMovie – Former Beatles’ great, Paul McCartney, got the legendary Capitol Studios, the top musicians, and arrangements to make this fabulous DVD. Music he grew up listening to in his childhood.  Live Kisses marked the launch of his #1 best selling CD “Kisses On the Bottom.”  It is highlighted with rare interviews featuring the star musicians:  Diana Krall, Joe Walsh, Eric Clapton, Tommy LiPuma, John Pizzarelli and Paul, and the arrangements include a 20-piece orchestra. The songs are sparkling renditions of classic songs from the American songbook, such as:  “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive,” “My One and Only Love,” and “I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter.”  Simply put, Paul McCartney at age 70 is superbly polished, perfectly in tune, and a wonderfully expressive vocalist!  Live Kisses was filmed in November 2012 at the exact time Paul received his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The DVD includes a 40 page book with many photos and the interviews transcribed into print.

 

Stoker (2013)

StokerMovie – It may not have anything supernatural about it, but Stoker is definitely a monster movie. It’s also a coming-of-age story, following eighteen-year-old India, played exquisitely by Mia Wasikowska. In the wake of her father’s death, India’s home is invaded by her father’s brother, Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode), who is determined to make his new place in their home permanent, no matter what.

If you’ve seen Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt, this might sound a little familiar, and with good reason. The similarities extend beyond the plot as well. Director Park Chan-wook, an acclaimed Korean director who makes his English-language debut with Stoker, is a master at creating tension out of tiny things, and the whole film is made up of tiny things that slowly piece together to become one big, horrifying thing. This is a disturbing movie, definitely not for everyone, but fans of dark psychological horror should love it.

A Late Quartet

Late quartetMovie – A Late Quartet features no special effects, criminal kingpins, drug abuse or physical violence; instead, it offers a thoughtful, character-driven, cerebral psychodrama. The movie focuses on a string quartet – called The Fugue – that has played together for 25 years, but is shaken when the cellist and oldest member decides he must retire when he learns that he has Parkinson’s Disease. Hidden resentments, affairs and multiple conflicts begin to surface. The plot shines light on the relationship between life and art. Life is the thing from which art comes: bloody, incoherent, embarrassing, arbitrary and cruel. Art is an idealized vision of life, with the power to bestow order on chaos. Plays and novels have explored this, but A Late Quartet does it effortlessly. Christopher Walken, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Catherine Keener and Mark Ivanir deliver great performances as the musicans who choose playing in quartet over solo careers. The movie uses Beethoven’s String Quartet No. 14 in C sharp minor, opus 131, as a metaphor for playing on through all of life’s ambiguity, pain and irony. I also appreciated the movie’s message about not being overly concerned with mistakes in playing the music, but rather to convey strong lyrical phrases.