A Seamless Murder by Melissa Bourbon

seamlessBookA Seamless Murder is the 6th book in the Magical Dressmaking Mystery series by Melissa Bourbon. While you don’t have to read them in order I highly suggest you do so.

From the glitz and glamour of New York’s fashion scene to the down-home styles of her hometown Bliss, Texas, Harlow Cassidy has come a long ways. When the local chapter of the Red Hat Ladies Club asks for her help making aprons for their upcoming progressive dinner, Harlow knows that no job is too small. Her dressmaking charm helps her to ‘see’ people in an outfit that will help them realize their heart’s wish, but will it help her to find out who wished Delta harm when she turns up dead. It has helped her before and she’s drawn into an investigation with more twists and turns than expected.

I adore Harlow and her magical family. They are such fun to read about. Her skills at sleuthing have developed over the series and so has her relationship with Will. This was a great addition to a sweet series.

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

annihilationBook – No one quite knows what happens in Area X. Cameras don’t work, modern technology breaks down, and all remnants of human civilization are slowly disappearing into the local biosphere. The first expedition reported a pristine Eden; the members of the second expedition all killed themselves; the members of the third expedition all killed each other. The members of the eleventh expedition all died of cancer. One of those was the biologist’s husband, and she’s going to go into Area X as part of the twelfth expedition. Maybe they’ll find some answers.

If you ever watched Lost and thought that the island just wasn’t creepy and weird enough, Annihilation, book one of VanderMeer’s award-winning Southern Reach Trilogy, is for you. The narrator never gives her name, only a biologist’s fascination with the flora and fauna of Area X and a scientist’s dispassionate narration of some extremely weird events. Later books in the trilogy offer some answers, but rest assured – there’s no disappointing explanation lurking in the back of this series.

Gates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. Lee

gates of threadBook – Gates of Thread and Stone is the first book in a series by Lori M. Lee.

Kai is different, she lives with Reev, her ‘brother’ that has kept her safe and alive in a world that is littered with dangerous people and ideas. In this world only one person is allowed magic. So Kai has to hide her ability to twist the threads of time. With Reev’s help, this hasn’t been a problem, until people start going missing and Reev is one of them. Now desperate to find him she has to trust the shopkeeper’s son, Avan, and a slew of people that do not have her best interests at heart.

I don’t often do this, but I gave this book a 5-star rating on Amazon and Goodreads. This was a fantastic balance of dystopia, magic, brutality, romance, and familial strife. I loved this book and am even more excited that I can share it with my teen daughter. There is romance in the book, but it doesn’t tip into what I feel is inappropriate for my young daughter to be reading about. The first in a planned trilogy, Gates of Thread and Stone is a must read.

Dead End Gene Pool by Wendy Burden

dead endBook – This is the memoir of the great-great-great granddaughter of the industrialist Cornelius Vanderbilt. Burden’s look back at her life contains very little warm sentiment. Perhaps her writing is catharsis for dealing with painful memories. She is the product of a dysfunctional family and a distinctly un-maternal mother, yet she recalls her past with acerbic humor. That sense of humor, and material drawn from the lifestyles of extremely privileged relatives combines for an interesting read.

Burden’s biography is populated with over-the-top characterizations of her family, servants, and numerous pets. These descriptions are often un-flattering, scandalous, and frequently successful in their aim to amuse. I admire the fact that she does not spare herself from this lampooning treatment. Burden begins her chronology at a point immediately after her father’s suicide, when she was approximately six years old. Her forthright portrait of her youthful self as a troublemaker who strove to emulate Wednesday from The Addams Family is disturbing and intriguing. Perhaps these traits are understandable for an individual who felt impoverished of family love.

The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary Pearson

adorationBook – To what lengths should parents go to keep their child alive? Should they do it even if it’s illegal? Is it really in the best interest of the child? The Adoration of Jenna Fox explores these questions and addresses issues of medical ethics. I don’t usually read young adult science fiction books, but I was mesmerized by this one. Jenna wakes up after being in a coma for over a year. She is 17 and has almost no memory of her previous life. Her parents try to jog her memory by having her watch videos of her childhood. As she slowly recalls events in her life, new mysteries surface for Jenna. Why did her family move from Boston to California, especially since her father still works there? Why is her grandmother cold and hostile toward her? She is remembering having two best friends – why aren’t they getting in touch with her? This is an interesting story of suspense that would appeal to both adults and teens driven by Jenna trying to define her identity. This book has received starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher’s Weekly, and School Library Journal.  The next book in this series is The Fox Inheritance.

Broken Harbor by Tana French

Broken-HarborBook – Many thought the Spains had the perfect life. Sweethearts as teenagers, they are happily married with two wonderful children. They buy their dream starter house in a luxury development in Broken Harbor near Dublin.  But something goes horrifically wrong! Patrick and the children are brutally murdered and Jenny the wife and mother is miraculously found still alive at the murder scene, but barely. It is up to veteran detective Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy and his new rookie partner Richie Curran to solve the crime. As the detectives further their investigation they find that things are not what they seem. The victims’ façade of the good life begins to unravel and secrets and various suspects surface including the Spains themselves. We also learn of Kennedy’s mysterious attachment to Broken Harbor. The author, Tana French, is a master of psychological suspense and this book will not disappoint. This is the fourth book in the Dublin Murder Squad series. They do not need to be read in order, but if interested, here are the titles in sequence: In the Woods, The Likeness, Faithful Place, Broken Harbor, and The Secret Place.

 

Fool Moon by Jim Butcher

fool moonBook- Fool Moon is the second book in a sixteen book series (with an additional eight short stories based in the world.) This audio book is read by James Marsters.

Fool Moon deals with the notorious gangster ‘Gentleman’ Johnny Marcone and the repercussions of the events from the previous book, however you do not need to read it to understand what’s happening, it’s just more fun that way.

Harry is broke and hungry and so listens to someone that needs his help over a steak dinner. This slip opens up an investigation involving five different flavors of were-wolves and endangers his life over, and over, and over, and over again. Basically a normal day in the life of Chicago’s only practicing wizard. With his wits and a whole lot of anger he works his way through a case that makes him look at humanity and the creatures of the Never-Never a little differently.

I adore this series and have read it no less than four times. A heroic tale ala Don Quixote, Harry always tries to do the right thing; even if it’ll kill him. This is my first time listening to it and I love it. James Marsters does a phenomenal job giving life to the various characters.

Majestrum by Matthew Hughes

majestrumBook – Henghis Hapthorn is a creature of logic. He uses his skills and talents to solve puzzles for the elite of the Archonate, the vast empire of human colonies spread throughout known space. Recently, though, he’s suffered a few setbacks. A dangerous encounter with a rogue magician – rare in this age of science and reason – has transformed Hapthorn’s computer assistant into an animal familiar, which now needs to sleep and eat, and has developed a personality of its own. Worse, the intuitive part of his mind has become its own person, and Hapthorn finds himself having increasingly bitter disagreements with himself. And now the Archon himself has hired Hapthorn to investigate a mystery that goes back to the origins of the Archonate, deep within the last age of magic, which may cause the foundations of the world to turn, leaving Hapthorn’s valued logic entirely useless.

Hughes’s prose is elaborate and ornate, making this relatively short book a somewhat denser read than I was planning on, but I loved it anyway. Hapthorn is a Sherlock Holmes type, but with problems Holmes never had (Watson never passed out in the middle of the action, or refused to work without regular deliveries of exotic fruit). The mystery is well-constructed, but the real joy is in exploring the universe Hughes has created, one based on science but where magic is real and increasingly important in the most important events of the universe.

Revival by Stephen King

revivalBook – King’s most recent novel has been hailed as a return to classic form, closer to a real horror novel than he’s written in a while. If you go into it looking for that, you might be disappointed, but that doesn’t mean it’s not fascinating. The story follows two men, narrator Jamie Morton and the man he refers to as his “fifth business,” the catalyst to all the really important events of his life, Reverend Charles Jacobs. Charlie (as he prefers to be called) is fascinated by “special electricity” all his life, but his interest takes a darker turn when his wife and son are killed in a car crash. After that – well, a horror novel called Revival with a lightning bolt on the cover does evoke a certain famous Doctor F., after all.

Revival isn’t as focused as the classic King novel it most evokes, Pet Sematary, and dealing as it does with similar themes and ideas, it suffers by the comparison. Where the plot meanders, though, the characters pick up the slack, and a few genuinely creepy moments (Jamie’s birthday-party nightmare sticks in the mind) carry you through rapidly to the end. The ending is, at least, classic Stephen King – sprawling, grotesque, and a little out of left field.

Yes Please by Amy Poehler

yes pleaseBookYes Please boldly presents personal stories and thoughts from the star of Parks and Recreation, Saturday Night Live, and Baby Mama. Rather than proceeding strictly chronologically, this autobiography humorously weaves through short chapters on topics such as being a teenager in the eighties, personal beauty, and her bond with her sons. Her passion for improvisational comedy is evident from several anecdotes relating to her starving artist days spent learning from “gurus” of the craft, co-founding The Upright Citizens Brigade, and working part-time at Chicago’s Second City.

It was refreshing to listen to this memoir narrated by a quick-to-laugh author and her assorted celebrity-friends that included: Patrick Stewart, Kathleen Turner, Seth Meyers, and Poehler’s parents. Poehler’s levity obviously infected them as well. Utilizing humor she effectively communicates deeper emotions when describing the difficulties of divorce, traveling in a third-world country, and dealing with guilt. Another advantage of the audiobook is the final chapter, which is recorded in front of a live audience at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theater.