The Little Stranger by Sarah Waters

Book – Dr. Faraday is a respectable country physician, but he keeps his childhood a secret – his mother was a maid at Hundreds Hall, home of the ancient and established Ayres family. And now that the new maid of the household is his patient, he’s even more reluctant to let it be known where he came from. But the Ayreses – widowed Mrs. Ayres, her spinster daughter Caroline, and her son Roderick – have much more to worry about than their friend the doctor’s history. Strange things are happening at Hundreds Hall, things that are putting a strain on the well-being of the family. Dr. Faraday is convinced that it’s only the effects of living in an old and decrepit house, but the family is sure there’s something more sinister going on.

The Little Stranger takes its time getting where it’s going; this is no fast-paced thriller. Rather, you have plenty of time to get to know Dr. Faraday, Mrs. Ayres, Caroline, Roddy, and Hundreds Hall itself. It’s the kind of haunted house story where you’re never quite sure who’s right and what’s really happening – although it helps to remember that the narrator, Dr. Farraday, has his own biases that may be getting in his way and ours. This is the perfect novel for a cup of tea and a gloomy October afternoon.

The Last Unicorn by Peter S. Beagle

bccf75d26f52209597a6c2b5567444341587343Book – In a lilac wood lives a unicorn who has heard a rumor that she is the last of her kind. Although unicorns are solitary creatures, she does not like the thought of being the last, so she sets off on a quest to find the rest of them. Along the way she meets a witch running a questionable carnival, a slightly (but not entirely) inept magician, a band of outlaws and their long-suffering cook, and (of course) a prince.

Reading The Last Unicorn is like reading your favorite fairy tale for the first time. It’s a tremendously deep, rich fantasy story that is nothing at all like Tolkien, but contains all of those things that made you like fantasy stories when you were small – talking animals, wizards, an evil king, true love, and, of course, unicorns. When I was a kid, I wore out the local video store’s VHS copy of the movie, which is not only gorgeously animated but is a remarkably faithful adaptation. (The singing, well, the less said about Mia Farrow’s duet with Jeff Bridges, the better.) This is the book I always turn to when I want to feel good about the world.

Her Smoke Rose Up Forever by James Tiptree, Jr.

2873d4688a8572a593231496241444341587343Book – Alice Sheldon was one of the most remarkable science fiction writers of the sixties and seventies. Uninterested in once again being The Woman in a man’s world, she wrote under the pen name of James Tiptree, Jr. entirely anonymously until 1977, at which point several people who had praised the masculinity of her writing were very embarrassed.

Personally, I don’t see how people couldn’t see she was a woman. “The Women Men Don’t See” is a story that could be comfortably classified as women’s fiction, even with the aliens, and “The Screwfly Solution” is a science-fictional horror story of women’s fears. “Houston, Houston, Do You Read” is a response to the feminist utopia novels popular at the time.

Every story in this collection (admittedly a best-of collection, but it represents a huge proportion of her short fiction overall) is outstanding. Many of them will linger on in your memory, cropping up in conversation when you’re talking to people who’ve never heard of Tiptree before. That’s all right – you’ll get to introduce them.

Home is Where the Bark Is by Kandy Shepherd

0425234290.01._SX450_SY635_SCLZZZZZZZ_Book – I love a good romance, but I want more than just lust and passion.  My favorite love stories are those that come with a side fluffbe it puppies, cats, horsesthe furry (and un-furry) creatures that so often bring people together in real life.  This novel has all that, and more.

Home Is Where The Bark Is brings us former model Serena Oakley.  Tired of being in the spotlight, Serena has worked hard to put the past behind her by disguising her looks and opening her own business, a doggy daycare called Paws-A-While.  Everything is going great until Undercover Private Investigator Nick Whalen enters her shop with a tiny pup in tow.  Serena knows something is up; this muscular, unsmiling man just doesn’t seem the type to have a precious Yorki-poodle mix.

However, Nick is there investigating the Paws-A-While owner over a series of identity frauds and he’s certain Serena has something to hide.  Slowly, despite their mutual insecurities with one another the pair begins to bond over a helpless dog, and that just might be enough to bring them together.

This is one of my guilty pleasures of romance novels.  Not your typical sexy posed woman draped across the cover type of books.  A cute one that make you go “Awwww’ because there are puppies involved.  Would recommend to anyone who loves a good romance of opposites attract and of course any animal lover. A perfect mix of puppy dog tales and love stories.

The Possibilities by Kaui Hart Hemmings

PossibilitiesBook – It’s been three months since Sarah’s 22 year old son, Cully was killed in an avalanche while snowboarding and she decides that it is finally time to pull herself together and go to work. She has also decided that it is time to go through Cully’s belongings and enlists the aid of her best friend, Suzanne. Sarah is shaken when they discover evidence that her son may have been involved in dealing pot. She also struggles that her idealized memories of her son may not be deserving and questions whether she could have been a better parent.

Soon after, a girl named Kit shows up on Sarah’s doorstep offering to shovel snow. Sarah’s father, Lyle, forms a comfortable bond with Kit and she soon reveals to them that she and Cully had a relationship. Sarah, still heavily grieving can’t believe that Cully kept this relationship a secret and she invites Kit into her home as a connection to Cully and to possibly learn more about her son. A memorial service planned for Cully brings together Cully’s mother, father, grandfather, Suzanne, and Kit. Kit makes an astounding revelation concerning Cully that could make a drastic impact.

This is a story of loss and heartache and how each character tries to find peace and come to terms with Cully’s death. This book has received starred reviews from Publisher’s Weekly and Kirkus Review. Kaui Hart Hemmings is also the author of The Descendants, which was made into a movie starring George Clooney which was nominated for an Academy Award for best picture.

The Gods of Gotham by Lyndsay Faye

the_gods_of_gotham-1Book – If you have any interest in mystery, historical fiction, New York City, Holmesiana or just plain well-written human drama, Lyndsay Faye is the author you never knew you needed in your life.  Unless you did, in which case well done you.

Timothy Wilde is a New York City bartender in 1845, lending an ear to the world’s problems and working up the courage to confess his love for his childhood sweetheart, Mercy.  When a fire does away with his job and his life savings, however, he stumbles his way (pushed by his brother, the larger-than-life, twice as troublesome and three times as irresistible Val) into the work he never wanted but always should’ve had: as a ‘copper star,’ a member of New York’s brand-new police force.  A chance encounter with a ten-year-old girl in a blood-covered nightgown puts him on the trail that ends in the bodies of twenty children and sends the entire city into a flurry of tension along racial, ethnic and especially religious lines.  And while his determination to find the truth will make an investigator of Tim, it will also challenge his preconceptions about the people he loves.

Written in rich period language (a glossary is included), The Gods of Gotham is a fast-paced and atmospheric thriller that stands on its own merits as both a mystery and a piece of historical fiction.  But what makes it exceptional are Faye’s writing style and command of human nature.  Her prose is insightful, incisive and deeply felt, and her characters memorable and well-rounded.  New devotees will be pleased to hear that Tim’s adventures continue in Seven for a Secret and the recent conclusion to the trilogy, The Fatal Flame.



Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosh

1451666179.01._SX450_SY635_SCLZZZZZZZ_Book – I don’t know what it is about Allie Brosh’s style that is so deeply hilarious. Is it the choppy storytelling, half-illustrated and half in prose? Is it the expressions on the faces of her MSPaint-drawn characters? Is it the stories themselves? Or is it a combination of all three that so regularly leaves me giggling helplessly for minutes at a time?

I first discovered Hyperbole and a Half as a webcomic in 2010, when it was still being updated semi-regularly. Then Brosh took a long hiatus due to a bad bout of depression, and then she came back with two outstanding comics about it (both of which are included in the book). There are a few other extras in the book as well, stories that were never published on the website, so ideally you should read both: once you’ve polished off Hyperoble and a Half, head over to the website and work your way through the archives. It’ll be fun, I promise.

Remember Me? by Sophie Kinsella

remember meBook – I’ve been reading a lot of Sophie Kinsella recently.  The Summer season always puts me in the mood for lighthearted comedies, and Kinsella’s books really hit the spot.

Remember Me? (not to be confused with the emotionally moving film featuring Robert Pattinson, although also worth a gander), by Sophie Kinsella , is a great choice for anyone who loves a good mystery with their comedy.  The novel follows Lexi sMART, a spunky young woman nicknamed “Snaggletooth,” who’s having a pretty crappy time in life. It’s 2004, and her boyfriend, Loser Dave, is always a no show, she was the only one who didn’t get a bonus at work, and then she’s in an accident to top it off.

When Lexi wakes up from her accident, she can’t remember anything.  It’s suddenly 2007, and she has no memory of the past three years.  She can’t recognize the tan, slim, flawless woman in the mirror. Life seems perfect: she’s married to a drop-dead gorgeous man, lives in a million dollar penthouse and is head of the company!  Things couldn’t be better, or so it would appear.  But things start to fall through when Lexi learns what kind of person she’s become, and just how imperfect her life really is.  Is it too late to rewind and change those last three years?  Is the past really lost for good?  Dive in to find out what happens!

With a quirky cast, drama, and secrets, Remember Me? makes a splash as a beachside read!  If you fancy some more Kinsella books, I highly recommend checking out Can You Keep a Secret? and The Undomestic Goddess. 


The Cure For Dreaming by Cat Winters

the-cure-for-dreaming-cat-wintersBook – Cat Winters weaves a tale to delight readers with her latest novel, The Cure For Dreaming.  Without even taking a peek into the pages of this book, the cover art alone sparked my curiosity immediately.  The dust jacket depicts a woman laying on her back, levitating above a chair, with spiraling rings overlaying the image.  Quite hypnotizing, you might say.  A perfect scene to preview the story that lies within.

The setting is Oregon; the time is 1900.  Olivia Mead is an independent and strong-willed young woman, fighting the patriarchy as a suffragist, much to her father’s dismay.  He would rather have a quiet, submissive daughter, someone to be seen and not heard.  But it seems Olivia’s rebellious streak will not be tamed…until hypnotist Henri Reverie comes to town and starts stirring things up.  Detecting an opportunity, Olivia’s father hires the young illusionist to prevent his daughter from speaking her mind, to suppress her fight for women’s rights.

Much to Olivia’s surprise, Henri has actually given her the ability to see people for what they truly are, yet without the ability to speak a word of her visions as she begins to see people manifested as good or evil.  Overwhelmed by the nightmarish sights around her, Olivia is more determined than ever to make her words known.

Cat Winters blends history with fantasy, entwining feminism and mystifying illusion to create a story that will charm readers of all ages.


Lumberjanes: Beware the Kitten Holy by Noelle Stevenson & Grace Ellis

1608866874.01._SX450_SY635_SCLZZZZZZZ_Graphic Novel – Jo, April, Mal, Molly and Ripley are spending the summer at Lumberjanes scout camp, officially known Miss Quinzella Thiskwin Penniquiqul Thistle Crumpet’s Camp for Hardcore Lady Types. In addition to earning badges like the Up All Night Badge and the Pungeon Master Badge (earned for being especially pun-ny), they’re discovering that something is very, very wrong in these woods. The three-eyed foxes might have been their first clue. Or the bearwoman. Or the creepily well-behaved boys of the scout camp next door…

This comic is just really fun. The girls are all tough and interesting, each in their own way (although I admit to being partial to Ripley, a half-feral kid younger than most of the others), and their counselors display a laudable degree of common sense in the face of all these supernatural shenanigans. It’s gotten an outstanding critical reception, too – originally slated for just an 8-issue miniseries, Lumberjanes will continue as an ongoing comic series and has already won two Eisner awards and been optioned for a movie