About Richard

I am a career reference librarian (MLS from Univ.of Hawaii), and I'm a subject expert in certain areas of music (big band jazz; classical). I have knowledge of histories and biographies about the big band era)

The Look of Love by Diana Krall

look of loveMusic – This is the cuddle by the fireside with someone you love album. Diana Krall is the great torch singer of our time, and this album features her signature throaty, sexy, husky style on sultry romances wafted on light Latin beats. The tone of the album falls within the spirit and the letter of bossa nova, and it deals with adult emotions specifically the ups and downs of love. It features the lush orchestrations of the legendary composer Claus Ogerman, with the London Symphony Orchestra and also the Los Angeles Session Orchestra. The album topped the Billboard charts and went to quintuple platinum in Canada, the first by a Canadian artist to do so.  A native of Nanaimo, British Columbia, Diana has sold more than 15 million albums worldwide, won five Grammy Awards with nine gold, three platinum and seven multi-platinum albums. She is one of the top female jazz vocalists and bestselling artists of our time. I loved all of these gorgeous love songs, especially “The Look of Love,” “S’Wonderful,” and “Dancing in the Dark.” She is married to the iconic British rock musician Elvis Costello, and they have twin sons. Her new album Wallflower will not be released until February 3, 2015. She has canceled all of her fall tour dates due to chronic pneumonia, as she needs to regain her strength and good health.

The Rolling Stones 1969-1974: the Mick Taylor Years

rollingMovie – This is an interesting documentary of a time period, after the death of Brian Jones, when Mick Taylor became the fifth Rolling Stone. If you look at the overall history of the Rolling Stones, the depth of musicianship in the late 1960s (post Brian Jones) to the mid-1970s (pre-Ron Wood) was unmatched, and they were arguably the best live band around. At that time, a young Mick Taylor was regarded as the best guitarist in the UK, and bringing in his talent to the band was a great move. Taylor’s brilliant guitar virtuosity greatly complimented the tough blues guitar riffs of Keith Richards. Mick Taylor’s presence on guitar gave the Stones a depth that allowed them to tighten up, explore different musical genres, and produced the Stones two most wholly realized albums: Exile on Main Street and Sticky Fingers.  The documentary uses penetrating interviews with noted rock music critics, remarkable behind the scenes film footage, and discussions of the group’s problems with finances, drugs and girlfriends.  The Rolling Stones are ranked by Rolling Stone magazine as fourth on the list of the 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, and their estimated album sales are above 250 million. They have released 29 studio albums, 18 live albums and numerous compilations. Sticky Fingers (1971), for example, was the first of eight consecutive number one studio albums in the US. This documentary is not as good as Ladies and Gentlemen: The Rolling Stones (1974), but it is certainly a must see.

Inspirato by Yanni

yanniMusic – Yanni’s new 2014 album presents his instrumental hits sung by the finest operatic voices. The lyrics were written by Placido Domingo, Jr., son of the legendary Placido Domingo. The younger Domingo has put words to some of the most beautiful and famous compositions of Yanni. The album’s featured vocal artists include Renee Fleming, Nathan Pacheco, Lauren Jelencovich, Rolando Villazon and others. Yanni (Yiannis Chryssomallis) grew up in Greece, but moved to the U.S. when he was 18. His New Age music blends jazz, classical, soft rock and world music, and he uses Middle Eastern and Oriental scales, mixed meters and a variety of exotic instruments. The album is influenced by his encounters with cultures around the world and is said to reflect his “one world, one people” philosophy. You may remember his PBS production Acropolis, which is the second best-selling music video of all time, seen in 65 countries by half a billion people. The song lyrics created for Inspirato are sung in Italian, English, Spanish and other languages, and they are amazingly beautiful, enchanting and relaxing. I liked “Ode alla Grecia,” “Amare di Nuovo,” and “Incanto,” but all 13 songs are simply fascinating. At least fourteen of Yanni’s albums have peaked at No. 1 in Billboard’s New Age category, as well as Inspirato. Yanni has performed in more than 20 countries around the world and has accumulated more than 35 platinum and gold albums. It is also interesting to note that Yanni set a Greek national record in the 50-meter freestyle swimming competition at age 14.

In Search of Mozart (2006)

mozartMovie – This is the definitive documentary about the life of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, the prolific and influential composer of the Classical era.  Mozart lived from 1756 to 1791, and during those short 35 years, he composed over 600 works, many acknowledged as pinnacles of symphonic, concertante, chamber, operatic, and choral music. He was born in Salzburg, Austria, and by age five showed prodigious musical ability and could play piano and violin and compose. Without resorting to docu-drama, In Search of Mozart traces the composer’s life through his music and extensive correspondence. Over 80 musical excerpts are featured in chronological order, fitting his life around the music. It dispels the common myths about his genius, health, relationships, death and character, quite unlike the glossy lies disseminated by the movie Amadeus. For example, Mozart did not die a pauper. The documentary weaves musical performances with authoritative interviews with musicians, historians, and world-famous scholars. After Mozart moved to Vienna, he established himself as the finest keyboard player in that city, but also composed his most famous and beloved operas:  The Marriage of Figaro, Don Giovanni, and The Magic Flute. He lived at the center of the Viennese musical world and had many friends. He enjoyed billiards, dancing and pets; he kept a canary, a starling, a dog and a horse for recreational riding. In Search of Mozart is a remarkable achievement, original, accurate, endearing and wonderfully entertaining.

Listen Up: the Lives of Quincy Jones (2008)

listenMovieListen Up is the documentary that provides an intimate look at the life of multifaceted music icon Quincy Jones, who shaped four generations of American sound. In an unusual, kaleidoscopic way, this movie takes you on a journey from Quincy’s early life of poverty on Chicago’s south side, to his move to an all-white environment in Seattle, and his life on-the-road as a trumpeter with Lionel Hampton. It follows him as he leads his own big band, and moves into production, arranging and film composing. Filmmaker Ellen Wiesbrod gets very close to Quincy, capturing many moods and remembrances. There are many comments from the great stars that he worked with, i.e. Frank Sinatra, Barbara Streisand, Michael Jackson, Ray Charles, Oprah Winfrey, Dizzy Gillespie, Steven Spielberg, Miles Davis, and many others including Jones’  family. Listen Up is a fascinating summation of his career in jazz, pop, R&B, hip-hop and other styles, and his film composing (In the Heat of the Night, Roots, In Cold Blood, The Color Purple and many more). He was the 1st black to write movie scores and the 1st black VP of A&R for a major record label. He produced Off the Wall and Thriller, the two albums that launched Michael Jackson into the pop stratosphere, and was the musical mastermind behind We Are the World. Only Sir Georg Solti has more Grammy Awards than Quincy Jones, who has 27. Listen Up is like a fine jazz number, layered and intricate with rhythm, flow and nuance.

Helen Forrest: the Voice of the Big Bands

helen forrestMusic – This is a truly remarkable album featuring the voice of Helen Forrest, who is known as the best of the big band singers from the 30’s and 40’s (the WWII generation). At the peak of her career, she was the most popular female singer in the United States. This album showcases her work with three famous bandleaders: Artie Shaw, Benny Goodman, and Harry James. She was the classiest of all the big band singers, with impeccable phrasing and unparalleled range and breath control, which made it easy to be heard over a 17-piece orchestra. Helen’s understated vocal style was sensual, feminine, controlled and simple; it suggested poetic images and brokenhearted reverie. Helen was often ill as a child and had to overcome a hearing loss in one of her ears. She was raised by her mother and a stepfather (who she hated) mainly in a brothel in Brooklyn. She dropped out of high school and started her rise to fame when Artie Shaw hired her in 1938. Subsequently, she became a national favorite, and in 1942 and 1943 she was voted the best female vocalist in the U.S. in the Down Beat poll. In the course of her career, she recorded more than 500 songs! I like all of the old songs, but especially “I’ve Heard That Song Before,” “Skylark,” and “Comes Love.” Of course, the music is enhanced by the fabulous clarinet playing of both Artie Shaw and Benny Goodman, as well as Harry James’ flawless trumpet.

Back to Brooklyn by Barbra Streisand

Music – This is the new live performance album from the great Barbra Streisand. She grew up in Brooklyn, and when the new Barclays Center luxury arena opened there, she agreed to present a live concert, which she rarely does because she has stage fright. The album has 26 songs, nine of which she had never performed on stage before. Barbra talks to the audience about her memories of living in her Brooklyn apartment childhood home. Of course, she went on to fabulous stardom as a singer-songwriter, author, actress, film producer and director. She is one of only twelve other entertainers who have an Oscar, Emmy, Grammy and a Tony award. She is the best-selling female artist on the Top Selling Artists list (32 top ten albums since 1963). She has released 51 Gold albums, 30 Platinum, and 13 Multi-Platinum. She starred in the movies Funny Girl, The Way We Were, and The Owl and the Pussycat, and many others. In Back to Brooklyn everything is perfect – the orchestra, the arrangements, and her voice (smoky, silken and lustrous). Every song is wonderful! I loved “The Way we Were,” Evergreen,” and “Here’s to Life.” Streisand, now 71, can still knock your socks off with what NY Times music critic, Stephen Holden, describes as her “gift for conveying a primal human longing in a beautiful sound.”

Muscle Shoals (2013)

muscleMovie – This is the new documentary history of the Muscle Shoals, Alabama recording studios. It is the story of how Rick Hall founded FAME Studios in the unlikely small town of Muscle Shoals, along the Tennessee River, and a group of white farm boys (known
as the “swampers”) became The Muscle Shoals Sound Rhythm Section session musicians. Countless major hit songs and great albums were subsequently recorded in these studios – as amazing as it seems. Many great recording artists are interviewed in the documentary, such as:  Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Bono, Alicia Keys, Etta James, Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Gregg Allman, Lynyrd Skynard, Elton John, Boz Scaggs, Willie Nelson, Paul Simon, Bob Dylan and many more. It is the remarkable story of how initial successes in soul and R&B led to the arrival of more mainstream rock and pop performers, and how the Muscle Shoals vibe produced so many great hits. Literally every big name wanted to record in Muscle Shoals, and to “get down and get greasy.” Filmaker Greg Camalier premiered Muscle Shoals at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013, and the soundtrack alone will give you goosebumps. I loved this documentary and all the incredible vignettes, such as how Aretha Franklin just blossomed for the first time, when she got into the Muscle Shoals studios.

China’s Great Wall (2006)

chinaMovie – China’s Great Wall is a great documentary using rare aerial shots, and lavish reenactments in high definition.  It reveals the myths, legends and technological marvels behind the massive structure, exploring construction techniques, and its history, featuring interviews with archaeologists, scientists and scholars. In 1907, Aurel Stein a British explorer and adventurer, making his way through the Taklimakan desert discovered the Jade Gate, the westernmost point of a more than 2,000-year-old fortification system. The walls, there are more than one, actually stretch for over 13,000 miles.  They were built to defend the Emperor Wudi of the Han dynasty and his people from the barbarians (Mongolians) living in the steppes to the north (around 130 BC). Other dynasties and other emperors continued work on the Great Wall and branches of it, for thousands of years, using forced labor. The purposes of the Great Wall have included border patrols, imposition of duties on goods transported along the Silk Road, and regulation of trade and immigration. The Wall includes watch towers, troop barracks, garrison stations and signaling capabilities (using smoke or fire).  The main Great Wall stretches from Shanhaiguan in the east to Lop Lake in the West, along an arc that roughly delineates the southern edge of inner Mongolia. Before bricks, the Wall was mainly built from rammed earth, stones and wood. I found this documentary fascinating as well as educational. Of course, some areas of the Wall, near tourist centers, have been preserved and renovated, but in many locations it is in disrepair.

In 27 Pieces: the Hilary Hahn Encores by Hilary Hahn

27MusicIn 27 Pieces: the Hilary Hahn Encores by Hilary Hahn, violin, is Hahn’s brilliant new 2-CD recording of 27 short pieces (“encores”) by contemporary composers. She is accompanied by pianist Cory Smythe. The album topped the Billboard classical charts and will likely win Hilary her third Grammy Award (she already has two). The individual pieces of new music have never been recorded before, and it’s likely you’ve never heard of the composers.  The album ranges from romantic to post-modern, from jazzy Hollywood film noir to the rural, folksy and obscure, from the purely abstract to the objective.  I liked the post-romantic “Whispering” by Einojuhani Rautavaara, and the meditative “Blue Curve of the Earth” by Tina Davidson, as well as the frenetic “Angry Birds of Kauai” by Jeff Myers.  All of the pieces struck me as intellectual, thoughtful, technically challenging “art” pieces. Hahn started her career as a soloist at age 16, and to date she has recorded 14 albums, three DVDs, an Oscar-nominated soundtrack and an award winning album for children.  She is known as the foremost American classical musician in promoting new post-modern music.  She performs worldwide, and as of June 2014 is completing a tour of 50 cities in 14 countries throughout North America, Europe and Asia. Her violin is an 1864 copy of Paganini’s Cannone made by Vuillaume. (She never lets it out of her sight!) The violin case comments on her life on Twitter at @violincase. By the way, Hahn’s recording of Samuel Barber’s Violin Concerto was used extensively in The Deep Blue Sea starring Rachel Weisz.