Leila

About Leila

I'm the Head of Adult Services at Warrenville Public Library District. I enjoy reading Fiction, particularly centered on family, relationships ad other cultures. I like to watch popular movies and follow several TV series including "Dexter," "Modern Family," "Mad Men," "Homeland" and "Downton Abbey." In my spare time, I enjoy cooking (and eating), yoga, and using my iPad.

The Nesting Place: It Doesn’t Have to Be Perfect to Be Beautiful by Myquillyn Smith

nestingBook – After reading this book, I wanted to buy a can of paint and get started on some of my decorating projects. Blogger Myquillyn Smith has lived in more than a dozen homes, most of them rentals. A self-taught decorator with limited funds, she shares her creative approach to reallocating her furnishings and painting and refurbishing thrift store finds. She stresses that good enough is better than doing nothing. This book is not a “how-to” book, although she does offer some DIY advice. It centers more on the author’s philosophy that people get stuck on seeking perfection, and that creating a home you love is more about finding your dwelling’s uniqueness and your own personal taste and celebrating it. Myquillyn is married and the mother of three boys and stresses to the reader that when you think about decorating a room, you need to consider the purposes of the room. The book ends with a page of decorating blogs that may be of interest to the reader. The Nesting Place is an inspiring, fun and approachable decorating book with tips that can be applied to any home.

The Big Tiny: A Built-It-Myself Memoir by Dee Williams

big tinyBook – Dee Williams lived in Portland in a 1927 three-bedroom bungalow she spent six years restoring. She began to reflect that most of her time was consumed with commuting, working as a State Hazardous Waste Inspector and maintaining her home and property. She didn’t have time to relax and do the things she enjoyed and she worried about juggling bills for her home, utilities, taxes and various other needs and wants. She was always tired and then, suddenly, she found herself confronted with a health issue. Waiting in the doctor’s office, she read an article featuring a man who’d built a tiny house on wheels and moved from his 1200 square foot home to live in it. She was drawn to the concept of planning and building her own tiny house and to live with only the essentials. She pursued her dream and, in this book, shares the process, her successes, her worries and the daily practicalities of living in a small dwelling. I was amazed by how resourceful and determined she was. She was passionate about her vision. She hauled lumber, learned (often by reading library books) how to analyze building codes, install electrical wires and plumbing and how to manage other projects related to building her home. She and her dog RooDee moved into her 84 square foot house in 2004. Its effect on her life was profound and she now writes and conducts workshops about small house living, green building and community design. This was an interesting book, written with candor and humor,  about establishing your own priorities and lifestyle and I enjoyed and was inspired by her journey.

The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison

RevisedBook – Ben Benjamin is in a low place – he’s lost his job, his home and his family. Hoping to start a new career, he enrolls in a night class called the “Fundamentals of Caregiving.” Upon receiving his certificate, he begins to care for his first patient, nineteen-year-old Trevor. Trevor has Duchenne muscular atrophy and requires an extensive amount of assistance from his mother, Elsa, and Ben. Trevor’s father, Bob, has awkwardly been trying to mend the rift he created with Trevor when he abandoned the family years earlier. Although Trevor and his mother have been rebuffing his attempts for years, when Bob is in a car accident, Trevor initiates the idea of a 600 mile road trip to visit him in Utah. When Ben and Trevor set off on their adventure, they have no idea about the people they’ll meet and the shift their lives will take on their journey.

While Ben struggles to keep a professional, emotional distance from Trevor, he also struggles with his own emotions in dealing with his tragic past. What keeps this book from becoming overly maudlin is the humor. The characters are quirky, and Evison highlights the absurd amidst the difficult situations in their lives. This book was an off-beat, surprising ride through the lives of Ben and Trevor.

Astonish Me by Maggie Shipstead

astonishBook – Joan has been studying ballet since she was a young girl. Her best friend in high school, Jacob Bintz, is in love with her, but Joan is intent on following her dreams of a dance career. She travels to Paris and becomes entranced with a Russian dancer named Arslan Rusakov when he performs during a rehearsal. They have a brief, intense affair and Joan evaluates her life and ambitions. As the story moves ahead, Joan’s future becomes entangled with her past in surprising ways. We get to know Joan’s family and friends and witness the complicated way relationships evolve and shift during their lives. I enjoyed this story as I learned more about the demands of ballet, the choices that performers may face and the way that talent can emerge and impact lives.

Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple

whereBook – Bernadette is married to a brilliant man, Elgin, who works for Microsoft, and her daughter Bee is a top student at a private middle school. When Bee asks to go to the Antarctica as a reward for her grades, Bernadette is thrown into a tailspin. She has lived a reclusive life in their rundown Seattle home for more than a decade. Using a virtual assistant from India to complete everyday tasks such as shopping and making reservations, Bernadette has tried to avoid mingling with parents from the school and her neighbors. As Bernadette takes increasingly drastic measures to avoid the trip, Elgin becomes more worried and then, Bernadette suddenly disappears. Bee is determined to solve the mystery and, in the process, discovers that people aren’t always who they seem to be. The story is told in a series of emails and correspondence from Bernadette, Elgin, Bee and various friends, doctors and co-workers. This book is fun to read and often laugh-out-loud funny. Bernadette has a wicked sense of humor, but she’s so vulnerable and lonely that I was rooting for her and hoping for a happy ending. I didn’t want to put this book down and was delighted to give away 20 copies for World Book Night on April 23.

The Storied Life of A. J. Fikry by Gabrielle Zevin

Book - The Storied Life of A.J. FikryA.J. Fikry is a curmudgeonly bookstore owner who lives on Alice Island. He recently has been widowed and is in a deep depression when he meets Amelia, the new sales rep from Knightley Press. He is curt with her during their first meeting and after she leaves, goes upstairs to his apartment, eats a frozen dinner and drinks until he passes out. When he awakens the next day, he discovers that the only item of value he possesses, a first edition book, has been stolen. Police Chief Lambiase takes the theft report and during the investigation, the men strike up a friendship. Lambiase is summoned back to the bookstore a short time later, because a toddler named Maya has been abandoned at the store. Fikry’s life is forever changed in the ensuing events, as he begins to discover things about himself and the people in his life. This is a charming tale, with a gentle humor, eccentric characters and observations about the unexpected paths our lives can take.   

Case Histories by Kate Atkinson

Case HistoriesBook - Three unresolved cases in England span twenty-four years. Case One involves the disappearance of three-year-old Olivia Land. Case Two involves the brutal, seemingly random, murder of eighteen-year-old Laura Wyre. Case Three involves Michelle, a new young mother who feels a murderous rage at being stuck alone out in the country with only her baby and husband for company. As private detective Jackson Brodie begins to look into the cases, he unearths startling discoveries and connections between the cases. We also get glimpses into Jackson’s own tragic past. As he comes to resolutions in the cases, he begins to make peace with his own history. This book was a page-turner and I enjoyed the plots twists and turns. It’s told from several different perspectives, which helps illuminate the hopes, struggles and failings of the characters. Despite the dark topics, the novel offers an overall message of hope and healing.

The Journal of Best Practices: A Memoir of Marriage, Asperger Syndrome, and One Man’s Quest to Be a Better Husband by David Finch

Journal of Best PracticesBook – David Finch has been married to Kristen for 5 years and their marriage is in crisis. They have two young children, own a home in the northern suburbs of Chicago and work full-time. But they no longer communicate with each other and miss the fun they had together before they were married. The catalyst for a change in their relationship comes in the form of an online survey testing for Asperger Syndrome. David scores 155 out of a possible 200. Kristen scores an 8. (David’s diagnosis is later confirmed by a medical professional.) David is stunned, but realizes that they now have answers for some of the behaviors that are causing issues in his life. He sets on a quest to improve those behaviors and his communication skills. He records his lessons and results in a Journal of Best Practices. David discusses the progress of his journey in a straight-forward and often humorous manner. I was impressed by the amount of effort it took him to learn, understand and maintain socially acceptable norms. Both David and Kristin were committed to the process, and Kristen’s patience in accepting and guiding David was also awe-inspiring. While this is a non-fiction account, if you are interested in further exploring personal accounts of living with Asperger Syndrome, try the novels The Rosie Project or The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time.

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline

orphan traBook – Orphan trains ran from the East Coast to the Midwest from 1854 to 1929. They carried orphan children who needed homes and were available for adoption. The children aboard the trains had few options and could easily be exploited in their new homes. Orphan Train tells two parallel stories: the current plight of foster child Molly Ayer and the life story of Vivian Daly, an elderly woman who once rode the Orphan Train. Their lives intersect when teenage Molly is assigned a community service project to help Vivian sort through the boxes stored in her attic. Molly has not known much unconditional love in her years in foster care, and as a friendship begins to blossom between the two woman, Molly is able to confront her current demons. In turn, Vivian is able to come to peace with her past and her secrets. This book illustrates and contrasts the situations and emotions that children without loving caretakers face, both in the past and the present. However, it also depicts the positive impact of people in the community who reach out with love and care in a troubled situation and, in doing so, can provide a bright and hopeful future.

Still Life with Bread Crumbs by Anna Quindlen

Still Life with Bread CrumbsBook – Sixty-year-old Rebecca Winter is a well-known photographer whose life has become stale. She hasn’t had any new ideas for her art, her income has dried up and her adult son has moved out of their plush New York apartment. Rebecca impulsively decides to rent a more affordable cottage, sight unseen, out in the country. She discovers the cottage and village are much more primitive and isolated than she anticipated. However, as she adjusts to the new, slower pace of her days, she begins to discover who she is as an artist and as a woman. She reminisces about her marriage and divorce, past lovers, motherhood, friendship and art. I enjoyed Rebecca’s journey, discoveries and insights as she embarked on a new stage in her life. Author Anna Quindlen illuminates the subtleties of everyday life. If you enjoy Elizabeth Berg and Anne Tyler, you may enjoy one of Quindlen’s novels.