Jaime

About Jaime

As a Circulation Clerk at the Warrenville Public Library, I seek a life in books. Aspirations include: adopting a dog named Blizzard, transitioning to the age of ebooks, and baking. Often found reading romance, fantasy, and watching creature features.

Funny Games (2008)

MovieFunny Games is, without a doubt the most infuriating film I have ever watched.  I should mention first that horror and thriller films are definitely not my genre of choice, but I can still appreciate what goes into the suspense and jump scares that give me the jitters.  After seeing Funny Games just one time, I adamantly refuse to ever watch it again.  However, I do acknowledge that what enrages me could be someone else’s favorite movie of all time.  To each their own.

It starts as horror stories often do: a family goes on holiday, anticipating a nice, quiet vacation.  Then two strangers show up (stranger danger!), and the trip quickly becomes their worst nightmare.  The two men first arrive at the house of the family requesting to borrow some eggs, but the offenders return with more sinister demands.  The men create a game of torture and violence against the family, who must struggle to stay alive.

Funny Games is brutal, and the way the offenders break the fourth wall and stare down the audience through the screen really makes my skin crawl.  I hate tension in movies, and the tension in this movie is excruciating for me to sit through without wanting to scream.  Maybe this film is worth watching for the horror or thriller enthusiast.

Trolls (2017)

Movie – Growing up I was never a big fan of trolls.  The odd little dolls just gave me the heebie jeebies with their creepy, smiling faces.  However, the 2017 movie, Trolls is a whole different story. I adore this film; it’s fun, musical, and just so colorful.  I’ve already watched it three times. Anna Kendrick and Justin Timberlake belt out the lyrics as main characters Poppy and Branch which is a real treat to listen to. I definitely recommend checking out the soundtrack after you watch the film.

Welcome to a world full of never-ending happiness, music, and love! The Trolls are the most joyful creatures who love throwing parties, breaking into song, and most of all, hugs!  Poppy is their beloved ruler, and the very best party thrower. However, these lively beings have a dark past. Years ago, the trolls were attacked by a miserable beastly species called the Bergens.  Since their escape, there have been no Bergen sightings for a long time. When the Bergens suddenly return and kidnap a bunch of trolls, it is up to Poppy to rescue them.  Poppy pairs up with Branch, an intolerable, grumpy troll, and they set off to save their friends. It’s an adventure featuring with unlikely duo, unexpected twists and turns, and fantastic musical numbers.

Everything about this movie makes me happy. The setting is so vibrant and colorful, and I love, love, love all of the trolls and their individual personalities. It’s a quirky, fun story that makes you want to get up and dance! By far one of my favorite films this year, and the best kid’s movie I’ve seen in awhile.

 

Memories…Do Not Open by The Chainsmokers

MusicThe Chainsmokers just renewed their debut studio album, Memories…Do Not Open.  Their previously recorded EP’s include Bouquet and Collage. I’ve recently become obsessed with The Chainsmokers, ever since I heard “Something Just Like This” playing on the radio. The DJing/Production duo consists of Andrew Taggart and Alex Pall. They have an intense electro-pop dance vibe that adds another dimension to their music. Primarily a DJ group, a lot of their music doesn’t feature their own vocals, which has its pros and cons. It’s great to explore the different sounds of other artists, but I also enjoy the moments where you can experience the vocals of Andrew Taggart, like in “The One.”

I love the majority of the tracks in this album, which is pretty rare for me. I think that’s mainly due to the variety of themes/moods and main vocalists. The Chainsmokers frequently feature other artists, while providing the electronics-pop acoustics. This is definitely one of my favorite things about the group because I get great music recommendations.

For a calming influence, I always default to “The One”, and “Bloodstream.”  When I’m looking for some pumped-up beats, I turn to the last four tracks of the album: “Honest,” “Wake Up Alone,” “Young,” and “Last Day Alive.” The “Last day Alive” to me feels a bit reminiscent of “715 CR∑∑KS” by Bon Iver and “Hide and Seek” by Imogen Heap. Both of these artists use synthesizers to alter their music, creating a very unique electronic sound that give their voices an almost robotic resonance. It reminds me of the voice-changer that is used to protect someone’s identities in a criminal investigation. A lot of the Chainsmoker’s music possesses this style; I’m eager to see how that transfers over to their live performances.

 

 

The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn

Book – After a chance meeting brought them together, Lucy and Owen fell in love.  Raised on the chaos of city life, the couple left New York City in favor of the quiet family-centered Hudson Valley, a small suburb of Beekman.  It’s a health-centered place where you know all your neighbors, and the local moms cook up hot lunch at the schools.  Over the years, the romance and attraction in Lucy and Owen’s relationship has fizzled, as they concentrate on raising their young autistic son, and dealing with the chaos of daily life.

It is on a rare drunken night with friends that the idea first hits them.  Their friends reveal they have begun an open marriage, which shocks Lucy and Owen. As the weekend passes by, however, Lucy and Owen just can’t shake this new knowledge.  Is it really as crazy as it sounds?  In the spur of the moment, they lay out the groundwork and compile a set of strict rules.  They agree on six months, no questions asked, but neither one has any idea how much their lives are about to change

The Arrangement by Sarah Dunn was not at all what I expected.  The story follows the relationship of Lucy and Owen, but it also blends in multiple other points of view, looking into a variety of marriages and relationships outside of the main couple. While one obviously expects there to be sexual content when reading about open marriages, I actually found the details to be pretty minimal, with more concentration on the changing family dynamic of Lucy, Owen and their son, as well as other relationship in the story.  I enjoyed this read because it felt very real, like something unfabricated, a glimpse into the life of someone who might actually exist.

 

Switching Places with Fido: Stories About Swapping Bodies with the Dog

Books Imagine waking up to find that your hands have become paws in the night.  You jump off the bed (on four legs!), look in the mirror and see a furry, wet-nosed face staring back at you.  But then, you turn around and see yourself, your human self, looking just as confused as you.  Somehow, you and your dog have swapped bodies!  Dog Days by Elsa Watson and The Dog in the Freezer by Harry Mazer (available through Interlibrary Loan) explore the bizarreness of  finding yourself stuck in the body of your furry best friend, making for some fun, quirky reads.

In Elsa Watson’s Dog Days, we meet struggling café owner Jessica Sheldon, who is going through a ruff time. Elsa holds the famed title of “number one dog hater” after an unfortunate incident in which she may have screamed at two unsuspecting pups.  “Woofinstock,” the towns annual dog-themed festival, is Jessica’s chance to redeem herself, and her café.  Jessica is in way over her head after volunteering for the festival, and taking in a stray dog named Zoe was never part of the plan. Things get even worse when Zoe and Jessica magically happen to swap forms.  While Zoe is ecstatic that she finally has the power to take any food she likes, Jessica is terrified imagining what her body double will do next!

The Dog in the Freezer is a compilation of three novellas, each tail showcasing the strong bound between a boy and his dog.  (Though we don’t have a copy of this novel at our library, you can request it through Interlibrary Loan).  This was one of my favorite’s growing up.  The body-swapping story is titled “My Life As a Boy,” about a hghschooler named Gregory and his genius dog Einstein.  Gregory and Einstein just wake up one day, on the day of Gregory’s very important basketball game, to find they have switched places!  Will Einstein be able to take Gregory’s place in the big game?  With tons of humor, and a touch of suspense, this book really is the fleas knees.

 

 

 

Parks and Recreation (2009-2015)

TV Series Parks and Recreation is my life.  I am not ashamed to admit that.  I’ve stopped counting how many times I’ve binge-watched the series from start to finish, and I’m proud of that.

Parks and Recreation is filmed in the same mockumentary style of The Office (another phenomenal tv series). Set at the Parks and Recreation Department of Pawnee, Indiana,  we follow deputy director, Leslie Knope as she works hard to beautify her beloved town of Pawnee (aka: “The Best City in the World”). With her best friend and beautiful nurse, Ann Perkins, Leslie embarks on a new project to create a park in a sad empty lot.  The endeavor proves to be more work than anyone could have imagined, but with the support of her friends and coworkers, there’s nothing Leslie can’t do.  Amy Poehler is a vision as leading lady Leslie Knope, and the entire cast is dynamite and full of spunk.

I aspire to have the passion and determination of Leslie Knope, the innovative mind of Tom Haverford, the woodworking skills and outdoorsmanship of Ron Swanson, the bubbling positivity of Chris Traeger, the adorable nerdiness of Ben Wyatt, the dark humor of April Ludgate, and the hysterical antics of Andy Dwyer.  Basically, I aspire to become the cast of Parks and Rec, but especially my hero, Leslie Knope.

All of our favorite dramas have those moments that put us in emotional turmoil, or make us question what we did to deserve the wrath of the writers.  While I believe Parks and Rec possesses a few of these moments, I can forgive the writers, because I adore this series.

Check-out some great memoirs by this stellar cast: Yes, Please by Amy Poehler, Gumption, Good Clean Fun, and Paddle Your Own Canoe by Nick Offerman, and Modern Romance by Aziz Ansari.

 

Love and First Sight by Josh Sundquist

Book – Josh Sundquist is a spunky motivational speaker and Paralympian. He lost his left leg to cancer at nine years old, and often pulls from his daily experiences dealing with his disability. Sundquist is a hilarious speaker and writer; I definitely recommend checking out some of his performances. He has also composed two memoirs, and Love and First Sight is his first novel.

In Love and First Sight, we meet sixteen-year-old Will Porter. Will is blind, and he is starting high school at a hearing school.  His first day does not go well; he manages to grope a classmate, make a girl cry hysterically, and sits on somebody in the lunchroom. But then he meets quiet, sweet Cecily who he quickly develops a crush on. When Will learns that a new type of medical operation could potentially return his sight, he is overwhelmed with the excitement of seeing the world for the first time. However, Will never anticipated the challenges he would face with the miracle of sight. Things are not quite what he expected, especially when it comes to Cecily. While Will’s friends described Cecily’s appearance to him when he was blind, Will finds that the girl he’s fallen so hard for doesn’t meet the typical standards of beauty. Though he knows it shouldn’t matter what she looks like, Will feels betrayed, and is unprepared for all the changes his newfound sight has brought to him. A coming of age story of young love, life-changing decisions and friendship.

For more fiction stories dealing with blindness, check out: Love Blind by Christa Desir, and Things Not Seen* by Andrew Clements (*Followed by Things Hoped For, and Things That Are. All three books of the trilogy are available on our pre-loaded Middle School Battle of the Books Kindle.)

Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett

Book – Rabbit Cake by Annie Hartnett has the most adorable bunny cover I have ever seen by far. But whilst one might expect to find a cute story of an adorable rabbit beneath this cover, we are instead met by death, mourning, and sleepwalking. The back synopsis was insane; there was such an onslaught of information I wasn’t sure I’d be able to follow everything going on when I actually started reading.

Elvis is 11 years old, and her mother has just committed suicide, or so everyone says.  Elvis is skeptical, and thinks something more sinister may be afoot in her mother’s death.  In the wake of her mother’s passing, Elvis is forced to undergo weekly sessions with the school counseling, and begins tracking her journey through the nine stages of grief. Her father mourns by dressing up in her mother’s clothes and wearing her lipstick. Elvis’s older sister, Lizzie unfortunately inherited her mother’s sleepwalking, and it’s quickly growing out of control. In the midst of trying to save her sister from meeting the same ghastly fate of her mother, Elvis works furiously on her mother’s unfinished memoir, and searches for answers into her death.

There is so much going on in this story; it’s dark, a  fair bit depressing, and very quirky. The sleepwalking was a huge aspect of the story, and I was so fascinated by it. Though it wasn’t the sweet story I anticipated from a glance at the cover, this book exceeded my expectations.

Here to Stay by Catherine Anderson

BookHere to Stay by Catherine Anderson is one of my staple romantic novels. Twenty-Eight year old Mandy Pajeck’s life revolves around caring for her younger brother Luke. Luke lost his sight as a young child, in a horrific accident that Mandy blames herself for. Mandy has done everything for the now angsty teenage boy since they were young. With an abusive father, and a mother who abandoned the two siblings, Mindy has always protected her brother and he never has to lift a finger. Luke plays on his sister’s guilt and  has never tried to learn to do anything for himself.

Romance is the furthest thing from Mandy’s mind until she meets hunky Zach Harrigan. Zach’s life used to revolve around parties and fun; he never had a reason to take anything serious. When his life begins to lack the luster it once had, Zach decides to use his expertise of horsemanship to do something meaningful for a change.  He begins to train a miniature horse to become a guide animal for the blind.  When Zach and Mandy cross paths, sparks fly, but Mandy just can’t let go of the past to make room for romance. As the two develop a closer relationship, Zach urges Mandy to confront her past, and the mystery of her mother’s disappearance. Could Zach be the one man that can change Mandy’s mind on love? Will she ever be able to move on from her past, and forgive herself for her brother’s blindness? A story of love, loss, and moving on; Here to Stay is chock full of feelings and hope.

The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

Book – I tend to forgo reading the “Message to The Reader” section that authors sometimes include in their novels, instead going straight to the meat of the story.  But Amazon had a free preview of The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan, so I took advantage of the few pages I could indulge in.  The author’s “Message to Readers”  is brilliant, funny, and overall a wonderful addition to the book. Colgan describes the best places to read her book, necessitating comfort as the top priority.  I loved her witty sense of humor and thought the excerpt was a great introduction to the story.

And the story begins with Nina, a librarian in a small library that’s going under in a world that no longer wants physical books.  While her coworkers join the newly joined “library center,” Nina decides for once in her life to take a chance on her dream job: opening a mobile bookstore.  She impulsively buys a van, and travels to a small town miles away to start a new life for herself.  A romance blossoms when she meets a poetic train conductor, and a whole new adventure begins.

I love the premise behind this book: Girl Loves Books, Girl Loses Job, Girl Buys Van, Girl Turns Van into Bookstore, Girl Falls For Guy, etcetera…insanity ensuing.  However, the story started losing me about halfway through and I felt that it was dragging.  I stuck it out, hoping the pace would pick up, and though the story gained some interesting turns, it still left me feeling just a tad let down.

Jenny Colgan is still one of my favorite authors, and I especially adore The Little Beach Street Bakery and its sequel, Summer at Little Beach Street Bakery.