Jaime

About Jaime

As a Circulation Clerk at the Warrenville Public Library, I seek a life in books. Aspirations include: adopting a dog named Blizzard, transitioning to the age of ebooks, and baking. Often found reading romance, fantasy, and watching creature features.

Crazy Plant Lady by Isabel Serna

Book – I’m so glad we added the adorable, simple, feel-good book for plant addicts, Crazy Plant Lady by Isabel Serna to our library collection. As a Crazy Cactus Lady, I 100% relate to, and appreciate, the comics and characterization of the obsessive gardener.

Serna defines “Crazy Plant Lady” as:

  1. A woman who has an insane, almost addictive love for plants.
  2. A woman who has 10 or more plants and gives them names, talks to them,  and thinks of them as her children.
  3. A woman who finds pure happiness in her plants.

To which I would respond:

  1. Yes, I have been called a crazy plant lady (which is really more of a compliment).
  2. Currently, I have more than 25 succulents and cacti. My big ole’ spiky Golden Barrel Cactus is named Chunk. I’ve read that plants respond well to positivity and encouragement (I think Ikea experimented being kind vs. mean to plants).  They are my little fuzzy, spiky, leafy family.
  3. There’s nothing like watching your plants grow, propagate their leaves and watch their babies start anew. I love to spread the joy and often coerce my family to come and see the newest little fuzzball propagate on my “Bunny Ear” Cactus.

The illustrations in this book are so bright and colorful, each page detailing new insight into the life and habits of a crazy plant lady, a page-turner for every plant lover.

 

Help Me!: One Woman’s Quest to Find Out If Self-Help Really Can Change Your Life by Marianne Power

Book – I love self-help books and so does Marianne Power, author of Help Me!: One Woman’s Quest to Find Out If Self-Help Really Can Change Your Life. There’s something to say about finding a self-help book that truly speaks to you. Even if the book doesn’t necessarily “help” you achieve the goal you’re hoping for, it is nevertheless cathartic reading.

I can especially relate to the following:

So why did I read self-help if it didn’t, well help?  Like eating chocolate cake or watching old episodes of Friends, I read self-help for comfort.  These books acknowledge the insecurities and anxieties I felt but was always too ashamed to talk about. They made my personal angst seem like a normal part of being human. Reading them made me feel less alone. 

After the “worst hangover ever,” and realizing she is desperately unhappy, Marianne embarks on the ultimate journey of self-discovery: she will read one self-help book per month for an entire year and each month follow the author’s advice to a “T”.  From facing her fears (skydiving and posing nude for an art class) to using Rejection Therapy to face her social anxieties, she hopes to find happiness and fulfillment. Unprepared for the stress and depression that accompany her journey, she is determined to see the project through. With humor and honesty, Marianne shares a deeply intimate and emotional examination of her life, which is therapeutic and relatable.

Marianne read a variety of self-help books along with other resources, including The Secret by Rhonda Byrne, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People by Stephen R. Covey and Daring Greatly by Brene Brown.

Let’s Get Crafty!: Fun Books to Ignite Your Creative Side

Books – Try one, or all, of these books today to learn a unique craft! From paper plants, to buttons and badges, to cat-lovers projects galore, we’ve got you covered with these crafty books full of DIY ideas!

Handmade Houseplants by Corrie Beth Hogg

If you’re a fan of Origami or other paper crafts, check out Handmade Houseplants and create beautiful works of art for all your favorite houseplants, even cacti and succulents! All of the different plant projects are so beautiful and I always enjoy finding new ways to show my plant love. Use the designs to create your own handmade greeting cards to share with friends and family, too.

Tiny Stitches : Buttons, Badges, Patches, and Pins to Embroider by Irem Yazici

Feeling the need to jazz up a jean jacket, or make crafty accessories to wear and share? Take home Tiny Stitches : Buttons, Badges, Patches, and Pins to Embroider and learn to stitch and sew to your hearts content! There’s something for everyone in this book full of metal pins embellished with embroidery, to patches of all shapes and sizes, and more!

The Cat Lover’s Craft Book : Cute and Easy Accessories for Kitty’s Best Friend by Neko Shugei

Find super cute projects to show your love of cats! Learn new skills, including embroidery and sewing to create tons of things to wear and share. From badges, to bags and purses, to doorstops and pillows, this book has a project for everyone!

A Beginner’s Guide to Low-FODMAPS and Happier Stomachs

Book List– A plethora of trending diets seeking to soothe symptoms of digestive disorders and create happier stomachs, includes the Low-Fodmap Diet. FODMAPs – Fermentable Oligosaccharide (mainly Fructose), Disaccharide (mainly Lactose), Mono-saccharides and Polyols (mainly certain fruits & vegetables) are carbohydrates seen by health ‘experts,’ as poorly absorbed by the small intestine and trigger digestive symptoms.

The low-FODMAP Diet : Step by Step : A Personalized Plan to Relieve the Symptoms of IBS and Other Digestive Disorders with More Than 130 Deliciously Satisfying Recipes by Kate Scarlata and The Complete low-FODMAP Diet : A Revolutionary Plan For Managing IBS and Other Digestive Disorders by Sue Shepherd are especially helpful introductions to the Low-FODMAP diet, offering detailed definitions, guides, and recipes for beginners.

Beat Your Bloat : Recipes and Exercises to Promote Digestive Health by Maeve Madden covers general digestive issues, gives detailed information on specific disorders, and treatment diets, including Low-FODMAPS. In addition to introducing a stomach-friendly diet plan with recipes, this book incorporates exercise-specifically yoga in treating symptoms.  As a super-fan of yoga, I highly appreciated this aspect of the book.

Digestive Health with REAL Food : A Bigger, Better Practical Guide to an Anti-inflammatory, Nutrient-dense Diet For IBS & Other Digestive Issues by Aglaée Jacob is the most informative of the books, giving an overview of digestive issues and personalized diet treatment plans for specific symptoms/disorders. This guide is “bigger” in size and contents, but well worth the read.

The Bloated belly Whisperer : See Results Within a Week, and Tame Digestive Distress Once and For All by Tamara Duker Freuman

What a perfect title – one that inspires hope!  This book includes a detailed quiz to best match symptoms to specific disorders and delves into those conditions in each chapter. I found this helpful to analyze specific symptoms, learn their possible causes, and treatments.

Check out related downloadable ebooks through Hoopla Digital.

Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist, and Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb

Book – I was excited for the recent release of Maybe You Should Talk to Someone: A Therapist, Her Therapist & Our Lives Revealed by Lori Gottlieb and am happy to report that the book exceeded my expectations.

Lori explores her personal experiences from the point of view of as therapist and patient. The concept of therapists seeking therapy for themselves was one I had never before considered. This prompted me to question how we, as a society view therapists.  Maybe You Should Talk to Someone is insightful, deep, thought-provoking and shows therapists in a different light. At the base we are all human beings, but as a people who pay others to provide a service, she demonstrates a unique lens in which to view therapists. Lori also shares stories about the work she did with patients, which includes humorous narration when describing her true feelings of an especially difficult patient. I find the therapist-patient relationship particularly fascinating and enjoyed reading all of the experiences Lori had to share.

She begins the book leading up to a devastatingly unexpected breakup, which ultimately leads her to seek out a therapist when she hits the breaking point. The order of events are easy to follow, as she switched between the present and past narratives.  Learning about her career path and the events that ultimately led her to become a therapist, is a journey of seeking and discovery we may all relate to. Her story on this is enlightening. Lori is a relatable author and readers will find at least one aspect to connect with in Maybe You Should Talk to Someone.

 

Exploring Anxiety Through Memoirs

Book List – There is a variety of self-help books concerning mental health. Memoirs are my favorite genre, featuring real stories from real people who share their raw experiences with mental illness. The following books explore anxiety through memoirs.

Okay Fine Whatever: The Year I Went From Being Afraid of Everything to Only Being Afraid of Most Things by Courtenay Hameister

In her memoir of goals, the author challenges herself to attack her fears face to face – an admirable task to take on, in a year. I was particularly interested in the chapter on using a Sensory Deprivation “Float” Tank – an adventurous activity, especially for the claustrophobic.  Hameister’s writing can come across as crude, due to her bluntness of storytelling, but I enjoyed how she narrated her inner monologue with each new experience. The book concentrates on fear, which I feel is strongly related to anxiety and the fear that prevents us from venturing into new and terrifying futures and endeavors.

Little Panic : Dispatches From an Anxious Life by Amanda Stern

The author’s memoir details her childhood growing up with anxiety and worry. I enjoyed reading of Amanda’s experiences, but also found them stress-inducing. Plagued by daily panic that her mother will suddenly die, or forget her own daughter exists, Stern lives in constant fear that everyone she loves might suddenly leave her. As a child of divorce, she is also caught between two conflicting worlds: that of the bohemian, free-spirited life with her mother and the strict, cold sterile environment with her father. I appreciate her honest and detailed narration, growing up a child fearing that her whole world could fall apart in an instant.

Other related books include: On Edge: A Journey Through Anxiety by Andrea Petersen, and Hi Anxiety: Life With a Bad Case of Nerves by Kat Kinsman.

 

 

Venom (2018)

Film – I’m not normally one for the superhero action films, but I made an exception for the 2018 release Venom.  First, it features the hunky Tom Hardy as the lead, which is always a valid reason to see a film.  Second, the visualization of Venom himself looked amazing in the trailers, encompassing everything I so love about creature features and sci-fi stories.

Journalist Eddie Brock knows that something sinister is going on at Life Foundation, and he’ll stop at nothing to find out what Carlton Drake is hiding in his laboratory behind closed doors.  Disaster strikes, and Eddie suddenly finds himself host to a symbiotic alien, Venom.  With his powerful and demanding alter ego, Eddie continues searching for answers, fighting for his own survival.  Carlton Drake is a far more dangerous villain than Eddie could have ever imagined, and he must join forces with Venom to try to save the world.  With a truly unexpected superhero, amazing depiction of venom, and humor a bit reminiscent of Deadpool, I highly recommend this film.  The bond forged between Eddie and Venom is dynamic, a real treat to see.

Waiting on a long list to get the Venom DVD from our library?  Check out a Roku Streaming Player and avoid the line!  You can stream Venom and hundreds of other free movies and tv shows all on one device!  All you need is a TV, monitor or laptop, 2 AAA batteries (not included) and a Wireless Internet Connection.  Visit the Member Services Desk for more information.  Look at our Warrenville Library Mobile Menu for a complete list of all our Mobile Devices available for check-out.

The Good Place (2016-Present)

TV Series – What happens after death?  Do you turn to dust, enter the spirit world, or join the realms of Heaven or Hell?  The Good Place puts a unique spin on the ol’ “What happens to us when we die,” question.

So you’re dead.  What now?  Enter the almighty architect and faithful guide to your afterlife, Michael. He’s here to help your transition from life on earth to death in the Good Place.  You’ve made it into Heaven!  Good for you!  For Eleanor Shellstrop, this reality is hard to believe.  She was pretty much the worst kind of person on Earth–self-centered, greedy, and has never done a nice thing for anyone in her life.  She’s pretty sure there’s been some mistake and any second she’ll be dragged down to the Bad Place.  She’s terrified Michael will realize his error.  In the Good Place, you are paired with your soulmate, and that’s how Eleanor meets Chidi, philosophy and moral professor.  They couldn’t be more different, but Chidi agrees to help Eleanor learn to be “good.”  With fellow couple, Tahani and silent monk Jianyu, the four delve into what it means to be good.

One of my favorite aspects of the show is that residents of the Good Place are rendered incapable of using curse words.  Eleanor has quite the risque vocabulary, which is censored and ends up saying “fork” often.  Janet is by far my favorite character.  Like a humanized robot version of Siri or Alexa, Janet is a personal assistant to each resident of the Good Place.  Simply say “Janet,” and she appears!  I love the show’s premise and incredible cast.  It’s hilarious, full of drama, and leaves us feeling good.  Check out Season 1 and 2 of The Good Place today!

All I Want For Christmas is a Cowboy by Jessica Clare

Book – A sweet romance, All I Want For Christmas is a Cowboy by Jessica Clare is a wonderfully cozy romance of two strangers who meet by chance during the holiday season.  Cassandra needs to escape her life for the holidays.  Her boss’s boyfriend has been harassing her since she met him and it seems like there’s no escape in sight.  The solution?  A Christmas in solitude spent alone at her parents’ cabin.  Driving through a snowstorm, Cassandra flies off course in an accident.

Eli is a real cowboy, living alone on his ranch tending to the cows and his dogs.  He’s content with his life the way it is, and is happy to spend the holiday in his reclusive home.  Ready for another Christmas in solitude, Eli’s plans are drastically altered when he finds an injured woman stranded in the blizzard from a car accident.  As any gentleman would do, Eli takes her to his home and tends to her wounds.  But when Cassandra awakens, she has no memory of who she is, or any reminder of her life before the accident.  As the two learn to cohabit the Christmas season together, Cassandra’s amnesia becomes less of problem, as they grow closer.  Separated from the chaos of her previous life, Cassandra thinks maybe this is her Christmas wish come true.  But life always seems to get in the way of things.

 

As You Wish by Chelsea Sedoti

Book – In As You Wish, author Chelsea Sedoti crafts a novel about the power of wishing.  In the small, boring town of Madison, the residents have a secret.  It is a secret they work hard to keep hidden from the prying eyes of the rest of the world, lest they be made a freak attraction.

In Madison, everybody gets a wish—one wish that will come true.    On your eighteenth birthday, you are led to the cave of wishes where the deed is done.  If it sounds too good to be true, that’s because it is.  The residents spend their youth conjuring up the perfect wish–to be the most beautiful, the best sportsman, to have the unconditional love and devotion of their chosen mate.  Many have made wishes that they will regret for the rest of their lives.  But there are no takebacksies.  No wish can be undone.

For 17 year old, Eldon, his upcoming wish is a source of stress and despair.  He fails to relate to the giddy excitement of his fellow classmates and friends as their wishing days also draw closer.  He is pressured constantly by his mother to do the right thing, to make a wish that will help his family and support those he loves.  What Eldon desires more than anything is to just ignore the whole tradition altogether and never make his wish.  Through the stories of other wishers and their mistakes, Eldon tries to understand how to make the best decision, a decision that could change his entire life for better or worse.  He’ll do anything he can to not make the same mistakes as those around him.