The Spirit of Christmas (2015)

Movie Perfect for the holidays and anytime you need a feel-good pick-me-up, The Spirit of Christmas is a keeper. It’s time for the holidays and why not?  I LOVE this movie! Slow romance, attractive leads, Christmas music, and a GHOST – what more can a viewer want? Actors Jen Lilly and Thomas Beaudoin are a match made in heaven, and star in other Hallmark/love stories–definitely worth the watch!

Kate is a bustling lawyer, a workaholic who never takes off for the holidays. This holiday season she has 3 weeks to appraise and sell the charming Hollysgrove Inn. It’s a time crunch, but Kate is up for the task. The only problem? The inn is haunted!  Luckily for Kate, she doesn’t believe in the paranormal, until she meets the ghastly Daniel Forsythe, a spirit who will stop at nothing to scare away appraisers who try to sell his home. Cursed to haunt the inn every Christmas, Daniel has never solved the mystery of his death, nor the reason for the curse befallen on him. The pair make a deal:  if, together they can solve the mystery of Daniels death and release him from his curse, Kate is free to finish her job and sell the inn.

Can this unlikely match  break the curse and set Daniel free before it’s too late? What else is at stake as Kate and Daniel grow closer?

1000 Books to Read Before You Die by James Mustich

Book – As a compulsive maker of to-read lists (you too?), I’ve always been dubious about letting anybody else choose my books for me. Sure, I wanted guidance about great titles I might otherwise have missed, longing for both a roadmap to self-education and advice on what to read for entertainment, but many book lists seemed one-note. Usually such lists contained only dense adult fiction classics, often heavy and depressing, almost universally written by English-speaking Westerners, the vast majority of them men.  Most annoyingly, none of the compilers seemed to remember that reading ought to be fun.

If I doubted that anyone would ever write the to-read list I’d been waiting for, I was delighted to be proven wrong.1000 Books to Read Before You Die is, despite the title, gloriously unpretentious, utterly inclusive and instantly convinced me to trust the author’s taste. Sure, about a dozen Shakespeare plays abound, and includes Waiting for Godot and the Confessions of St. Augustine, but they jostle elbows with Alison Bechdel’s graphic memoir of her dysfunctional family, multiple picture books by Margaret Wise Brown, The Pillow Book of Sei Shonagon, and even The Da Vinci Code. Mustich’s selections run the gamut from: fiction and nonfiction; children’s, YA and adult; ancient and brand-new; popular entertainment to serious philosophy and everything in-between. From a memoir of the moon landing to the greatest of all children’s novels,  to an anthropologist’s look at Australian Aboriginal culture, a prototypical hardboiled noir to a firsthand examination of race in present-day America--and that’s just among authors whose names start with C. Mustich offers a book for every taste, interest and mood.

My only complaint: it should really be titled:  one thousand and one books. 1000 Books to Read is surprisingly devourable. Mustich’s essays on his book selections are charming, thought-provoking and incisive–that you’ll want to read it cover to cover.

Favorite Children’s and Young Adult Books of 2019

Books – The weather outside is frightful, but reading a new book over winter break can be delightful!  Here are some of my favorite Children’s and Young Adult books published in 2019.  I hope you enjoy them as much as I did!

Aurora Rising by Amie Kaufman (YA Fiction)

I don’t usually read much science fiction, but this space-based story caught my attention right away with its compelling characters and adventurous plotline.

Because of the Rabbit by Cynthia Lord (Juvenile Fiction)

A shorter chapter book about the impacts of true friendship–even the friendship of a rabbit!

The Big Book of Monsters by Hal Johnson (Juvenile Non-Fiction)

For fans of the scariest of creatures.

Cheshire Crossing by Andy Weir (YA Graphic Novel)

I am a huge fan of fractured fairy tales, so this book was right up my alley!  What happens when Alice, Dorothy and Wendy meet and their fantasy worlds collide?

Daniel’s Good Day by Micha Archer (Picture Book)

Daniel explores what makes a “good day” for the people around him.

Dear Justice League by Michael Northrup (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

Even superheroes are not perfect.

Sparkly New Friends by Heather Burnell (Beginning Reader)

A unicorn and a yeti become best friends who both love sparkly things.  What is not to love?

The Line Tender by Kate Allen (Juvenile Fiction)

This beautiful, unique story of grief and connection to nature’s mysteries had me sobbing.

Strange Birds by Celia C. Pérez (Juvenile Fiction)

Four unlikely friends team up to protest a revered feathered hat connected to town history.  A story of friendship, civic engagement, and bird facts!

Stargazing by Jen Wang (Juvenile Graphic Novel)

For fans of Raina Telgemeier’s books.

They Called Us Enemy by George Takei (YA Non-Fiction Graphic Novel)

A powerful and important account of Japanese internment camps during World War 2.