Searching (2018)

DVD – How well does a parent really know their child? And to what lengths will a parent go to protect their child? These questions are answered in the thriller Searching.

David Kim is a widowed dad who thinks he has a very close relationship with his16-year-old daughter, Margot. She is in advanced classes in her high school and takes piano lessons. She takes her studies very seriously, frequently staying out late at a friend’s house for group study. David wakes one morning and finds that he had three missed calls from Margot. At first, he assumes that she got home late from her study group and left in the morning for school before he woke up. David keeps texting, leaving messages, calls the school, and Margot’s piano teacher. He realizes something is terribly wrong. Margot left the study group early, never went to school, and finds out she quit her piano lessons six months ago, apparently stashing away the money from the lessons. David calls the police only to realize that he doesn’t actually know who Margot’s friends are. Detective Rosemary Vick takes the case and encourages David to follow Margot’s digital footprints to get information about the people she knows and her interests. He manages to log into Margot’s laptop, which she left behind and learns some surprising things from her social media accounts and digital history.

Did she run away? Was she abducted? Is she still alive or dead? Searching is smart and suspenseful, with unexpected plot twists as dad and detective race to find the missing Margot.

Ghost Wall by Sarah Moss

Book – Sylvie and her family are taking a holiday to live as ancient Britons. Her father is obsessed with ancient ways of life, from traditional knowledge like hunting and foraging to ancient religion and the bodies found in the bogs. (Sylvie is named after an ancient goddess.) They’re joining a class of experimental archaeologists, students who are much less committed to the reenactment than Sylvie’s father. The longer the trip goes on, the further the students are drawn in to the environment of the Iron Age – just as Sylvie, inspired by the students’ stories, begins to dream of a different future for herself. And then the professor suggests that they build a ghost wall – a barricade topped with skulls the Iron Age Britons used to use in war – and things begin to get very serious very quickly.

Ghost Wall packs a hefty punch in less than 150 pages. Sylvie isn’t exactly an unreliable narrator (she knows perfectly well that her father is obsessive and abusive) but the things she accepts without question make for a very particular point of view. Her father’s obsession with a “pure” British history raises questions of immigration and identity, and the directions he takes his obsession raise even more questions about what virtues there are in knowing your own history.

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

Book– Do not let the book’s thickness fool you. Knowing that I gravitate towards historical fiction novels, a dear friend of mine recommended All the Light We Cannot See and I could not put it down!

Doerr uses succinct, alternating chapters narrated by a blind French girl and a German boy, illustrating different perspectives of World War II from a child’s point of view. Although the Holocaust, Russian sieges, invasion of Paris, and the Allied Invasion of France are acknowledged, it is worth noting that the author assumes readers have some background on World War II, as the novel’s focus is on how the character’s development is shaped by war conflict.

Marie-Laure lives in Paris with her father, who works at the Museum of Natural History. The museum is rumored to hold The Sea of Flames, a jewel whose beholder becomes immortal at the expense of all their loved ones fatal suffering. At six years old, Marie-Laure’s vision deteriorates and she eventually loses her eyesight completely. Despite Marie-Laure’s visual impairment, her father makes it his mission that she learn to navigate on her own. He builds a miniature model of the town so she can tactilely memorize her way about the neighborhood. Fast-forward six years to Nazi-occupied Paris. Seeking refuge, Marie-Laure and her father flee to Saint-Malo and stay with her agoraphobic great-uncle, and with them, they carry the most valuable and dangerous stone, The Sea of Flames.

Werner is an orphan boy who lives in a mining town in Germany. Fond of applied mathematics and science, he is fully enticed with the processes behind operating and maintaining devices, so much so that he becomes the town’s go-to person for fixing various radios. After another successful repair, Werner is recruited to an academy for Hitler’s Youth, where his talents will be put to use. Werner is kept in the dark regarding the implications of his special assignments to track the resistance. At first, he creates triangles and finds points on a map, and only later comes to realize the destruction caused by his seemingly innocuous actions. Torn between doing what is expected and understanding what is moral, Werner questions his loyalties when he and Marie-Laure’s paths converge in their attempts to survive Saint-Malo’s bombings.

All the Light We Cannot See poses compelling questions about fate, free will, and making the right choice in a time when the pressures of political forces meet moral ambiguities. It is available in book, audiobook on CD, and e-audiobook via OverDrive formats.

Venom (2018)

Film – I’m not normally one for the superhero action films, but I made an exception for the 2018 release Venom.  First, it features the hunky Tom Hardy as the lead, which is always a valid reason to see a film.  Second, the visualization of Venom himself looked amazing in the trailers, encompassing everything I so love about creature features and sci-fi stories.

Journalist Eddie Brock knows that something sinister is going on at Life Foundation, and he’ll stop at nothing to find out what Carlton Drake is hiding in his laboratory behind closed doors.  Disaster strikes, and Eddie suddenly finds himself host to a symbiotic alien, Venom.  With his powerful and demanding alter ego, Eddie continues searching for answers, fighting for his own survival.  Carlton Drake is a far more dangerous villain than Eddie could have ever imagined, and he must join forces with Venom to try to save the world.  With a truly unexpected superhero, amazing depiction of venom, and humor a bit reminiscent of Deadpool, I highly recommend this film.  The bond forged between Eddie and Venom is dynamic, a real treat to see.

Waiting on a long list to get the Venom DVD from our library?  Check out a Roku Streaming Player and avoid the line!  You can stream Venom and hundreds of other free movies and tv shows all on one device!  All you need is a TV, monitor or laptop, 2 AAA batteries (not included) and a Wireless Internet Connection.  Visit the Member Services Desk for more information.  Look at our Warrenville Library Mobile Menu for a complete list of all our Mobile Devices available for check-out.