Colossal (2017)

Movie – After coming home so-late-it’s-early and hungover one too many times, Gloria’s boyfriend kicks her out of their New York apartment, and since she’s also out of work, she has no choice but to move back to her parents’ empty house in the town where she grew up. She gets a job tending bar for a guy she knew when they were kids, and shortly after, everyone is glued to the news, watching footage of the giant monster that mysteriously appeared in Seoul, South Korea, tromped through downtown, and disappeared again. When it happens again, Gloria recognizes something in its gestures — and realizes that she is in control of the monster. Sharing her revelation with her new-old friends, however, has unexpected and momentous consequences.

I saw a trailer for this movie that made it look like “rom-com plus Godzilla,” which meant that of course I had to see it, but it turns out it’s even better than that – Gloria’s growth and development does not revolve around her finding the right guy to date. She’s dealing with alcohol problems, an unhealthy relationship with her boss, and mysteriously wielding an unusual amount of supernatural power. It’s an unusual genre mash-up, but if you like stories about women taking control of their lives and also giant monsters, you’ll love it as much as I did.

47 Meters Down (2017)

Movie – As someone who’s claustrophobic and terrified of drowning, this movie made me tense.  However, I always love a good shark film. In 47 Meters Down, we meet Lisa and Kate, two best friends on holiday in Mexico. Lisa just broke up with her cheating boyfriend and they’re hoping to escape it all.  Then two handsome gents invite the friends to go cage diving with the sharks, promising the experience of a lifetime. From the get go, things seem a little shady, but Lisa and Kate know this is a one time opportunity. The red flags are there every step of the way, yet as in any creature feature/sharky shark film, all logic must be ignored.

I enjoyed all the scenes featuring our great white friends, though there weren’t nearly enough, in my opinion. The psychological aspect of the film was unexpected and added yet another layer of uncomfortable tension, but was really well done.

The whole situation is terrifying to me: a limited air supply with a very real risk of getting the bends swimming to safety. Swim to the surface too fast, and the pressure increase will be too much for your body to handle. Definitely not a good predicament to find yourself in when there are sharks circling hungrily nearby. This definitely solidified my desire to never tank dive–not that I was so determined to do so anyway. A good film, not enough sharks.  There really are never enough sharks.

For another shark escape adventure, check out The Shallows, with actress Blake Lively.

 

The Deepest Secret by Carla Buckley

Book – How far would you go to protect a family member?  “The Deepest Secret” explores that loyalty on various levels.  Tyler would like nothing more than just be a normal teenager, but unfortunately he suffers from Xeroderma pigmentosa (XP).  This is a rare condition that makes sunlight and artificial UV light fatal.  He can only leave his house at night and only go to those areas where neighbors have complied with requests to use special light bulbs.  His mom, Eve, is understandably over-protective to the point that her concerns annoy some neighbors and Tyler’s teachers. By being confined indoors during the day, Tyler wants to observe how normal people live. So under cover of darkness he spies on his neighbors through their windows and takes photos of them.  Tyler’s sister, who is slightly older than him is rebellious and feels neglected and his Dad only comes home for the weekends commuting from a job to help cover all the medical expenses.

When the 11 year olf daughter of Eve’s best friend in the neighborhood disappears and is found dead, distrust flows freely among the neighbors.  It seems that the resident families have many secrets and aren’t above false accusations and cover ups.

This is a psychological thriller high in family drama. The story would make a great choice for a book club.  This would appeal to fans of Jodi Picoult, Lisa Scottoline, and the book Defending Jacob.

Crash Override by Zoë Quinn

Book – If you are a person who lives on the Internet, you probably know who Zoë Quinn is – or at least you know the movement that sprung up after her ex-boyfriend posted a long, defamatory screed about her online, and then grew into an online harassment machine. Even if you don’t, though, you’ve seen some of its effects in the rise of online hatred, the never-ending stream of YouTube-star scandals, and the recent death of a man in Kansas by “swatting” – the practice of calling in a fake report to a police department that will result in a SWAT team being sent out.

Quinn’s book is part memoir, part guide to this environment of a new kind of harassment, one that disproportionately targets women, people of color, and other minorities, and which police and the legal system are woefully unprepared to cope with. She describes how she survived the initial onslaught, and the barrage of harassment and privacy violations she continues to struggle with, and how she founded an organization to help other victims do the same. She also offers some valuable information on how to protect yourself from a similar harassment campaign (without “just getting offline”). But even if you’re not concerned about attacks from the Internet, this is a valuable book to read. Internet culture is a part of our culture now, and we all should be aware of the ways it can go horribly wrong. (Also, Quinn has a great sense of humor. Seriously, just read the chapter titles.)

Noteworthy by Riley Redgate

Book— At scholarship student Jordan Sun’s elite, arts-focused boarding high school, getting cast in the school musical isn’t just a fun diversion–it’s a make-or-break-your-career proposition. After she gets passed over for the musical the third year running, Jordan gets some hard advice. For an alto 2 like Jordan, the deepest register for female voices, there just are not many parts, leading or otherwise, in musical theater. Shortly after, Jordan hears that there is an open spot in the Sharpshooters, the most prestigious a capella octet on campus, and decides to audition. The only catch? The Sharpshooters is an all-male group. Can alto 2 Jordan be just the tenor the Sharpshooters need?

Redgate’s characters, especially the Sharpshooters, are a diverse, tight-knit bunch and it’s a pleasure to see Jordan become a member of their little family. I was worried that I wouldn’t be able to enjoy this story because I know next to nothing about music and even less about a capella, but I needn’t have worried. Noteworthy should appeal equally to music neophytes and music buffs. If you like realistic, well-drawn characters, high school stories with a dash of romance, and stories exploring gender, you’ll definitely want to read this book. If you enjoy this one, you might also enjoy the manga series Ouran High School Host Club, which has a fairly similar premise (girl cross-dresses and gets in with a popular club of boys at a prestigious school) but a sillier tone.

Girls (2012)

TV Series – It seems to me that the TV series Girls has become an obsession in the world of millennials, and just in general.  It’s one of the most realistic portrayals of mid-twenties life that I’ve seen in a television show.  Sure, certain aspects are clearly dramatized, as in any popular series, but it just feels real.

Lena Dunham stars as the main character, Hanna, but is also an executive producer, which is pretty impressive.  The series follows a group of budding adults: our starring character, Hanna, her best friend, Marnie, the bubbling Shoshana, and eccentric Jessa.  They each have such distinctive personalities; it’s fascinating to see how they change and grow as the seasons progress.  They’re in that phase of their lives where they’re cut off from their parents, struggling to pay rent, while also trying to maintain friendships, romantic relationships, and holding down jobs to support themselves.  The experiences can be crude, disturbing, and intensely sexual, but it’s also though-provoking and something good to reflect on.  It deals with difficult topics including: mental illness, drug use, sexuality and the daily struggles of life.

I turn to The Office when I need some comedic relief after watching Girls, which often makes me think too much about my own 20’s life.  It presents characters that feel like people I might know and provides a good example of how relationships change after college. I really enjoy this series as a whole.  As an added bonus, Adam Driver stars in the show, albeit as Adam, an often disturbed/disturbing love interest.  I adore Adam Driver as the angsty Kylo Ren, so it’s always a pleasure to see him on screen.

 

 

Why’d They Wear That? by Sarah Albee

Book – Did you know that traditional Inuit sealskin mittens have two thumbs, so they can be flipped and worn the other way when the palms get wet?

That’s not the kind of intriguing tidbit I’d expect to pick up from a book on the history of fashion, but it’s only one of the ways that Why’d They Wear That? exceeded my expectations.  Most books on historical clothing are big, glossy coffee table books from museum presses.  That’s great as a visual feast, but the focus of such books tends to be narrow, and the text is often dense, dry and in tiny font.

Why’d They Wear That? gloriously smashes that mold, but without sacrificing either visual pleasure–it’s bright, bold and gorgeous–or quality of information.  It’s playful in tone, deeply readable and, most importantly of all to me, focuses on whys as well as whats, delving into the practical and societal causes and consequences of what people wear, such as the significance of indigo dye to colonialism and Anglo-Indian relations.  And it’s wonderfully broad in scope, not only covering a vast stretch of time but also–as in the Inuit example above–maintaining a truly global perspective.

Obviously with so much to cover in a slim 200 pages, Why’d They Wear That? provides more of an overview than an in-depth examination.  But as a casual read for a cozy afternoon, it’s a fabulous choice for anyone (adults too, despite its home in Juvenile Nonfiction!) who’s interested in costuming, fashion or history.

I Believe in a Thing Called Love by Maurene Goo

Book–High school senior Desi Lee likes to have her life under control. With perfect SAT scores, high school popularity, and a great relationship with her goofy, Korean-drama-obsessed widower dad, Desi’s drive and methodical determination have gotten her almost everything she wants in life. The only thing she’s missing is a boyfriend. When she feels an instant connection with impossibly cool and handsome new student Luca Drakos, she decides to apply her scholarly single-mindedness to the project of snagging Luca. Using her father’s Korean drama formulaic romances as a template, she devises a step-by-step plan to win Luca over. Staged near-death experiences and contrived K-drama hijinks ensue.

I had mixed feelings about this book; Desi’s plans cause real harm to real (well, fictional-real) people and she is upfront about how bonkers her plans get. I found that this book was immensely fun if I didn’t take it too seriously, sort of like Korean dramas themselves, in fact. Desi is a charming, strong-willed protagonist with an out-of-whack moral compass who, without spoiling anything, gets off a bit too easy for some of the dangerous stunts she pulls. If you enjoy I Believe in a Thing Called Love, I recommend books by Jenny Han and Sarah Dessen.