A Seamless Murder by Melissa Bourbon

seamlessBookA Seamless Murder is the 6th book in the Magical Dressmaking Mystery series by Melissa Bourbon. While you don’t have to read them in order I highly suggest you do so.

From the glitz and glamour of New York’s fashion scene to the down-home styles of her hometown Bliss, Texas, Harlow Cassidy has come a long ways. When the local chapter of the Red Hat Ladies Club asks for her help making aprons for their upcoming progressive dinner, Harlow knows that no job is too small. Her dressmaking charm helps her to ‘see’ people in an outfit that will help them realize their heart’s wish, but will it help her to find out who wished Delta harm when she turns up dead. It has helped her before and she’s drawn into an investigation with more twists and turns than expected.

I adore Harlow and her magical family. They are such fun to read about. Her skills at sleuthing have developed over the series and so has her relationship with Will. This was a great addition to a sweet series.

Annihilation by Jeff VanderMeer

annihilationBook – No one quite knows what happens in Area X. Cameras don’t work, modern technology breaks down, and all remnants of human civilization are slowly disappearing into the local biosphere. The first expedition reported a pristine Eden; the members of the second expedition all killed themselves; the members of the third expedition all killed each other. The members of the eleventh expedition all died of cancer. One of those was the biologist’s husband, and she’s going to go into Area X as part of the twelfth expedition. Maybe they’ll find some answers.

If you ever watched Lost and thought that the island just wasn’t creepy and weird enough, Annihilation, book one of VanderMeer’s award-winning Southern Reach Trilogy, is for you. The narrator never gives her name, only a biologist’s fascination with the flora and fauna of Area X and a scientist’s dispassionate narration of some extremely weird events. Later books in the trilogy offer some answers, but rest assured – there’s no disappointing explanation lurking in the back of this series.

Gates of Thread and Stone by Lori M. Lee

gates of threadBook – Gates of Thread and Stone is the first book in a series by Lori M. Lee.

Kai is different, she lives with Reev, her ‘brother’ that has kept her safe and alive in a world that is littered with dangerous people and ideas. In this world only one person is allowed magic. So Kai has to hide her ability to twist the threads of time. With Reev’s help, this hasn’t been a problem, until people start going missing and Reev is one of them. Now desperate to find him she has to trust the shopkeeper’s son, Avan, and a slew of people that do not have her best interests at heart.

I don’t often do this, but I gave this book a 5-star rating on Amazon and Goodreads. This was a fantastic balance of dystopia, magic, brutality, romance, and familial strife. I loved this book and am even more excited that I can share it with my teen daughter. There is romance in the book, but it doesn’t tip into what I feel is inappropriate for my young daughter to be reading about. The first in a planned trilogy, Gates of Thread and Stone is a must read.

Dead End Gene Pool by Wendy Burden

dead endBook – This is the memoir of the great-great-great granddaughter of the industrialist Cornelius Vanderbilt. Burden’s look back at her life contains very little warm sentiment. Perhaps her writing is catharsis for dealing with painful memories. She is the product of a dysfunctional family and a distinctly un-maternal mother, yet she recalls her past with acerbic humor. That sense of humor, and material drawn from the lifestyles of extremely privileged relatives combines for an interesting read.

Burden’s biography is populated with over-the-top characterizations of her family, servants, and numerous pets. These descriptions are often un-flattering, scandalous, and frequently successful in their aim to amuse. I admire the fact that she does not spare herself from this lampooning treatment. Burden begins her chronology at a point immediately after her father’s suicide, when she was approximately six years old. Her forthright portrait of her youthful self as a troublemaker who strove to emulate Wednesday from The Addams Family is disturbing and intriguing. Perhaps these traits are understandable for an individual who felt impoverished of family love.

Castor, The Twin by Dessa

castor the twinMusic Dessa is a 33-year-old rapper and writer from Minneapolis, a part of the cerebral indie hip-hop collective Doomtree. Her style is much more musical than most rappers, but her skill with words is outstanding. (And fair enough – she graduated from the University of Minnesota with a philosophy degree at age 20.) She and the rest of Doomtree appear regularly on “most-underrated” lists of modern artists, but despite all this critical acclaim, she hasn’t yet made it big. It’ll happen one of these days, because Dessa is just too fantastic to ignore.

Castor, the Twin is a remix album of many of her more highly-produced tracks from earlier albums, False Hopes and A Badly Broken Code. What that means is that this is a hip-hop album with a singer-songwriter feel. If Joni Mitchell did hip-hop beats, she might sound like Dessa. There’s not a bad track on the album, but my favorites are “Dixon’s Girl,” a sympathetic shout-out to under-appreciated and abused women in the music industry, and “The Crow,” which borrows the symbol of Edgar Allan Poe’s avian nemesis for a soul-baring song about loss and survival.

The Adoration of Jenna Fox by Mary Pearson

adorationBook – To what lengths should parents go to keep their child alive? Should they do it even if it’s illegal? Is it really in the best interest of the child? The Adoration of Jenna Fox explores these questions and addresses issues of medical ethics. I don’t usually read young adult science fiction books, but I was mesmerized by this one. Jenna wakes up after being in a coma for over a year. She is 17 and has almost no memory of her previous life. Her parents try to jog her memory by having her watch videos of her childhood. As she slowly recalls events in her life, new mysteries surface for Jenna. Why did her family move from Boston to California, especially since her father still works there? Why is her grandmother cold and hostile toward her? She is remembering having two best friends – why aren’t they getting in touch with her? This is an interesting story of suspense that would appeal to both adults and teens driven by Jenna trying to define her identity. This book has received starred reviews from Kirkus, Publisher’s Weekly, and School Library Journal.  The next book in this series is The Fox Inheritance.