Guilty Pleasures by Renée Fleming

Guilty PleasuresMusic - Guilty Pleasures by Renėe Fleming with Sebastian Lang-Lessing conducting the Philharmonia Orchestra is the luscious new album following her Grammy Award winning album Poėmes. It is an album of very beautiful songs and arias, many of them rarely recorded, selected by Renėe and sung in eight different languages. Out of the 17 choices, I especially loved “La Delaissádo,” by Canteloube, “Once There was a Golden Bird,” by Corigliano and “Dóme ėpaís” (Flower Duet, Lakmé) by Delibes (sung with Susan Graham, mezzo-soprano). Former CSO conductor Sir Georg Solti said that in his life he had only heard two sopranos with such great quality: Fleming and Renata Tebaldi! Renėe is a four-time Grammy winner and our national treasure, traveling all over the world and performing with every major opera company and symphony. She is an advocate for literacy and has been featured in the Association of American Publishers campaign (Get Caught Reading), as well as the READ poster campaign for the American Library Association. Renėe is a product of both Eastman and Juilliard, but also sings jazz and pop songs. In fact, she recorded the jazz album Haunted Heart, and the soundtrack of The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King. She is known as the “people’s diva,” but speaks fluent German and French. She is from Indiana, Pennsylvania. The New York Public Library has designated her as a “Library Lion.” By the way, she has written a book titled The Inner Voice.

In Great Waters by Kit Whitfield

In Great WatersBook – What would the world be like if there really were mermaids? No, really, what would that be like? That’s the question Kit Whitfield sets out to answer in her spectacular novel In Great Waters, an alternate history of the world where the royalty of Europe are all descended from the deepsmen, tribes of not-quite-human folk who live in the sea and who first rose to land in Venice in a time of political strife. Now – in something very like sixteenth-century England – a half-human, half-deepsman boy has been abandoned by the deepsman tribe that tried to raise him. He represents an opportunity – the chance to overthrow the incompetent, inbred crown prince before he has a chance to ruin the kingdom. The boy himself, however, may have some different plans.

This is a tremendously inventive story, not fantastical at all except for the existence of the deepsmen – if it were set in the future, you’d call it science fiction. The book explores the implications of its premise, but it never loses sight of the characters at the heart of the story: abandoned, bastard Henry and Princess Anne, both trapped by others’ expectations and fighting to define themselves on their own terms.

The Lost Symbol by Dan Brown

lost symbolBook - Towards the beginning of Dan Brown’s third book featuring Harvard symbologist Robert Langdon, Langdon points out that fewer students in his class have visited their own nation’s capital than have traveled abroad. In The Lost Symbol Brown wraps the buildings, monuments, and leaders of this nation in the intriguing style of clandestine history with which he previously enlivened the locales of Paris and Rome. At the request of a close friend and mentor, Langdon is called to Washington D.C. to present a lecture. However, his arrival at the U.S. Capitol Building begins a race to save his mentor’s life. During the thrilling chase and unraveling of codes meant to protect sacred metaphysical truths, and intertwining revelations of noetic science, readers are treated to a captivating underground tour of Washington. As in the movie National Treasure a large part of this story’s success is the authentic impression of historical embellishments. Here are several texts to help distinguish fact from fiction before embarking on a trip inspired by The Lost Symbol: Secret societies of America’s elite : from the Knights Templar to Skull and BonesThe Truth About Masons, Secret Societies and How They Affect Our Lives Today, Secret Societies: Gardiner’s Forbidden Knowledge, The Washington Monument : it stands for all, America’s library : the story of the Library of Congress, 1800-2000The City of Washington, an Illustrated History. I listened to The Lost Symbol with the Library’s updated Overdrive app, which has convenient controls for listening at advanced speeds and for setting a timer.

 

The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein

Book – My grandson Lorenzo, Enzo for short, was born just a few weeks ago.  Enzo . . . the name made me think of one of my favorite books, The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein.  The story is told from Enzo’s perspective, but what is very different about this novel is that he is a dog, a lab terrier mix.  I had my doubts whether I would like this book, because it is about auto racing and the world is viewed through a dog’s eyes.  But I read it, since it was on all the best seller lists and I was looking for a good candidate for our book discussion group.  Not only did I love The Art of Racing in the Rain, but it was a great pick for discussion.  From the book jacket:  “Enzo knows he is different from other dogs: a philosopher with a nearly human soul (and an obsession with opposable thumbs), he has educated himself by watching television extensively, and by listening very closely to the words of his master, Denny Swift, an up-and-coming race car driver. Through Denny, Enzo has gained tremendous insight into the human condition, and he sees that life, like racing, isn’t simply about going fast. Using the techniques needed on the race track, one can successfully navigate all of life’s ordeals.”  A movie version is currently in production and will star Patrick Dempsey, who is an amateur race car driver as Enzo’s owner Denny Swift.  You don’t need to be a dog lover an auto racing fan to enjoy this book. It is a feel good story of loyalty, family, thoughtful philosophical insight, and working to reach your full potential.

Crazy Sexy Diet : eat your veggies, ignite your spark, and live like you mean it! By Kris Carr

Crazy sexy dietBook – After receiving the gift of a blender marketed for creating nutritional smoothies, I sought out recipes and nutritional information to expand upon what was provided in the small booklet that came with the appliance. In this book Kris Carr, cancer survivor and popular author of Crazy Sexy Cancer Tips, has gathered medical experts together to explain the reasoning behind “a low-glycemic, vegetarian program that emphasizes balancing the pH of the body with lush whole and raw foods, nourishing organic green drinks, and scrumptious smoothies.” Carr intersperses information from nutritional studies with everyday tips for incorporating often radical changes into one’s everyday diet. These changes include reducing one’s consumption of meat, sugar, gluten, caffeine, alcohol, and dairy. Her book uses sassy language, personal anecdotes, and a colorful magazine style layout to motivate readers to alter their eating habits for the sake of their health, mood, energy, and longevity. Other library offerings with recipes and information on liquid nutrition include: The Juice Lady’s Turbo Diet by Cherie Calborn, The Juicing Bible by Pat Crocker, and The Lean by Kathy Freston.

Last Bus to Woodstock by Colin Dexter

last busBook – Two girls are waiting for a bus but, impatient, they decide to hitch a lift instead. Later that night one of them is found murdered outside a pub. Enter Detective Inspector Morse, unhappily middle-aged, cranky, romantic, and (as his supervisor will say in a later novel), entirely too clever for his own good. No one is telling the whole truth, and Morse runs himself in circles second- and third- and fourth-guessing everyone’s motives in an attempt to find out what really happened that night on the way to Woodstock.

Last Bus to Woodstock shows its age in a lot of ways, not least the extremely dated attitudes toward sex and rape that nearly all the characters express, but it’s still a good, solid mystery with an engaging detective. I particularly liked the way Morse keeps getting things wrong: he makes lots of wild guesses and assumptions and follows lots of trails that lead only to dead ends before finally (of course) hitting upon the solution.

Written from the mid seventies through the late nineties, Colin Dexter’s popular Inspector Morse series was also made into a TV show that continues to be popular on PBS’s Masterpiece Mystery, and has spawned two spinoff shows of its own.

State of Wonder by Ann Patchett

State of WonderBookState of Wonder by Ann Patchett starts in Minnesota and sends us on an exotic journey down the Amazon River to the Jungles of Brazil. Pharmacologist Marina Singh receives word that her research partner, Anders Eckman, has died of a mysterious fever and that his body is buried somewhere in the Amazon Jungle. Anders was sent there by their pharmaceutical company to check on the progress of the development of a new fertility drug by Dr. Annick Swenson, because she refuses to respond to the company’s increasingly urgent queries. Marina agrees to go to the Amazon for the sake of Anders’s wife, who has her doubts about his death, and for the company that still needs answers from Dr. Swenson.

Marina arrives in the town of Manaus, where she eventually hooks up with Dr. Swenson. Marina discovers that Dr. Swenson has a hidden agenda regarding the secrecy of her research and the mystery surrounding the death of Dr. Eckman. Fast-paced and beautifully written, the reader will feel the oppressive heat, heaviness and crawly feeling of the jungle.  Definitely a page turner and very thought provoking, especially regarding the issues of science and ethics.  Recommended as a book discussion read. If you enjoy this book you may want to read these:  Intuition by Allegra Goodman, The Sound of Butterflies by Rachael King, Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad, The Constant Gardener by John Le Carre, and other books by Ann Patchett.

Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline

orphan traBook – Orphan trains ran from the East Coast to the Midwest from 1854 to 1929. They carried orphan children who needed homes and were available for adoption. The children aboard the trains had few options and could easily be exploited in their new homes. Orphan Train tells two parallel stories: the current plight of foster child Molly Ayer and the life story of Vivian Daly, an elderly woman who once rode the Orphan Train. Their lives intersect when teenage Molly is assigned a community service project to help Vivian sort through the boxes stored in her attic. Molly has not known much unconditional love in her years in foster care, and as a friendship begins to blossom between the two woman, Molly is able to confront her current demons. In turn, Vivian is able to come to peace with her past and her secrets. This book illustrates and contrasts the situations and emotions that children without loving caretakers face, both in the past and the present. However, it also depicts the positive impact of people in the community who reach out with love and care in a troubled situation and, in doing so, can provide a bright and hopeful future.

Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore by Robin Sloan

penumbraBook – “What do you seek in these shelves?” What recently unemployed graphic designer Clay Jannon sought was employment. His quest was successful at Mr. Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore; a place with bookshelves and ladders extending up three stories, and a collection of curious books that are never bought, but are “checked-out” by eccentric individuals. Clay calls upon his friends to assist him with investigating mysteries which extend far beyond the walls of the enigmatic store. This thought-provoking tale includes puzzles that revolve around technology as antiquated as the printing press and as cutting edge as Google wizardry. The humorous writing and optimistic tone make this novel a rejuvenating read. Appropriately, this book offers a surprise if the reader turns out the light. The audiobook does not offer that perk, but the narrator Ari Filakos delivers the likable Clay’s inner monologues and quirky humor so well that I went back and listened to some key sections to hear his moving delivery of them.

Marley (2012)

marleyMovie – This new DVD is the definitive life story of Bob Marley, the musician, revolutionary, and legend. It is the story of the man from his humble beginnings in the Jamaican slums to his rise to international superstardom. Over 30 years after his death, Marley remains the most widely known and revered performer of reggae music. He is credited for helping spread Jamaican music to the worldwide audience. Working with official rights to the music and access to Marley’s family and friends, Oscar-winning documentarian Kevin Macdonald creates a thorough account of Bob’s life. The film features rare footage, never before seen performances, previously unreleased music, and revelatory interviews with the people that knew him best. His death, at age 36 in 1981, does not dominate the movie. Instead, the message of hope and freedom from oppression for people everywhere is the theme, as much as the great music. Marley’s music and imagery was popular during the protests in the Middle East and Africa and at the Occupy Wall Street demonstrations. Bob’s album Legend is the second-longest charting album in the history of Billboard magazine’s record-keeping. Marley is an impressive and thoughtful portrait that will remain one of my favorite documentaries.