Live Kisses

Live KissesMovie – Former Beatles’ great, Paul McCartney, got the legendary Capitol Studios, the top musicians, and arrangements to make this fabulous DVD. Music he grew up listening to in his childhood.  Live Kisses marked the launch of his #1 best selling CD “Kisses On the Bottom.”  It is highlighted with rare interviews featuring the star musicians:  Diana Krall, Joe Walsh, Eric Clapton, Tommy LiPuma, John Pizzarelli and Paul, and the arrangements include a 20-piece orchestra. The songs are sparkling renditions of classic songs from the American songbook, such as:  “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” “Ac-Cent-Tchu-Ate the Positive,” “My One and Only Love,” and “I’m Gonna Sit Right Down and Write Myself a Letter.”  Simply put, Paul McCartney at age 70 is superbly polished, perfectly in tune, and a wonderfully expressive vocalist!  Live Kisses was filmed in November 2012 at the exact time Paul received his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The DVD includes a 40 page book with many photos and the interviews transcribed into print.

 

The Art of Migration by Peggy Macnamara

MigrationBook – According to Macnamara, Chicago lies along a bird migratory route called the Mississippi Flyway. Insects such as butterflies and dragonflies migrate through this area as well. This beautifully printed little book succinctly introduces novices such as myself to the migration groupings one might expect to see in the Chicagoland area each season. Reading this, it felt like a treat to go behind the scenes with Macnamara and her co-authors to learn what ecological wonders local naturalists have witnessed through their work and observations. The inclusion of ancedotes from local establishments such as the Willowbrook Wildlife Center and the Field Museum bring the narrative close to home. Macnamar’s art and words even take us behind the scenes into the restricted sections of the Field Museum. Each beautifully printed illustration is accompanied by notes on the production of the artwork. These notes would be especially helpful to any fledgling wildlife artist. Because portions of the book are arranged by season, it is easy to flip to the relevant section to gain some insight into what might be traveling through my neighborhood currently.

Storm Front by Jim Butcher

stormfrontBook – In Storm Front, Jim Butcher introduces Chicago’s own wizard named Harry, Harry Dresden. The sarcastic yet vulnerable Harry derives much of his living from consulting for local law enforcement. The detective story format used for Harry’s stories gives them a 1940s’ film noir quality. In this introduction to Harry’s world, he is called in to investigate a double homicide, apparently committed with dark magic. His investigation is complicated because he’s trying not to taint his own reputation after a mysterious death in his past placed him on probation under the rule of the wizard’s council. This 300 page book is a quick read with plenty of inventive action and mysteries to unravel. Butcher has created a detailed world of magic as well as a memorable cast of characters that inspired the TV series The Dresden Files. The library collection contains 15 books in this series as well as eMedialibrary editions such as eAudiobooks that are performed with the well matched narration of James Marsters (who played Spike on Buffy the Vampire Slayer).

Stoker (2013)

StokerMovie – It may not have anything supernatural about it, but Stoker is definitely a monster movie. It’s also a coming-of-age story, following eighteen-year-old India, played exquisitely by Mia Wasikowska. In the wake of her father’s death, India’s home is invaded by her father’s brother, Uncle Charlie (Matthew Goode), who is determined to make his new place in their home permanent, no matter what.

If you’ve seen Alfred Hitchcock’s Shadow of a Doubt, this might sound a little familiar, and with good reason. The similarities extend beyond the plot as well. Director Park Chan-wook, an acclaimed Korean director who makes his English-language debut with Stoker, is a master at creating tension out of tiny things, and the whole film is made up of tiny things that slowly piece together to become one big, horrifying thing. This is a disturbing movie, definitely not for everyone, but fans of dark psychological horror should love it.