The Body Is Not an Apology: The Power of Radical Self-Love by Sonja Renee Taylor

Book – It’s rough living in this world with a body. It seems like there’s always someone to tell you that you’re doing it wrong – your body is too big, too small, too brown, too different, too much. And a lot of advice for dealing with this becomes yet another burden to carry: you must love your body, or you’re letting down the side. You must be beautiful in your own mind, or you are giving in. Sonja Renee Taylor offers a refreshingly different set of strategies, a series of questions and suggestions to put all those demands in context. Who is asking this of you? What do they gain by asking you to do this work? And how can you love yourself – not just your body, but your whole self – in spite of it all?

I’m very picky about self-help books. I’m not interested in anything that suggests there is one simple solution to a large and complex problem (which is, of course, what most self-help books are trying to sell). Taylor does offer just one solution, but it’s far from a simple one – learn how to love yourself in defiance of everything in the world that tells you that you are unlovable. She offers a range of tools for beginning that work, but never suggests that she has the only answers, only that she has answers that have worked for her and for others in the past. There’s a lot to digest in this short book – less than 120 pages – but it’s all very, very worthwhile.

The Brand New Testament (2017)

Movie – To give mankind the awareness of their own death may be an inapprehensible phenomenon, but Ea has done just that. The Brand New Testament is a dark yet humorous film about God, who, by the way lives in Belgium with his wife and daughter, creates inconveniences and atrocities to all of mankind out of his own boredom. His daughter Ea is not very fond of it and has had enough. After discovering her father’s malicious intentions are being controlled through a dated computer, she rebelliously sends out the death dates to everyone on Earth. What would you do if you know when your last breath would be? Would you leave the job you dread? Would you spend your life’s savings? Or would you not change a thing? Six very different lives answer just that in Ea’s search for additional apostles to add to the New Testament.
This French film was incredibly thought provoking and had an amusing spin on all things biblical. Although it was in French (English subtitles provided), the dialogue was light enough to truly enjoy the essence of the sheer artistry. The cinematography and plot was encapsulating, it’s no wonder that the film was up for numerous awards and was generally favorable among critics. If you’re looking for something different but nonetheless refreshing, this is one to see.

The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina by Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa

Book – When the weather cools and the air turns crisp, I am ready for some spooky reads. I grew up watching Sabrina the Teenage Witch on ABC’s TGIF so I was immediately intrigued to see a more grown up version of a childhood favorite. Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa’s The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina Vol. 1 is a re-imagining of Sabrina’s origin story. Sabrina isn’t the bubbly and wholesome witch I grew up with, there are no funny magical mishaps nor life lessons learned in this graphic novel rendition. Sabrina and her terrifying aunts, Hilda and Zelda, are dark, vicious and callous. The Spellman family show little compunction to bloody murder and satanic worship. But don’t be scared away by this! Aguirre-Sacasa lends an interesting plot to this intense read and the artwork matches the intriguing plot. The story is set in New England in the 1960s, a nod to the original Archie comics where Sabrina was introduced back in 1962. Sabrina’s 16th birthday is upon her and she must decide if she wants to become an immortal witch and join the coven or to be simply a normal teenage girl. Unfortunately for Sabrina, her tragic and grisly origin will literally come back to haunt her making her decision rather bleak.

If you’re looking for a spooky read to welcome the Halloween season you won’t be disappointed. Can’t get enough of Aguirre-Sacasa’s spooky retellings? He also wrote the graphic novel Afterlife with Archie, available through Hoopla! Also, keep an eye out for the television series based on The Chilling Adventures of Sabrina coming later this fall.

Death Wish (2018)

DVD – This movie is a remake of the 1974 version that I admit I did not watch.  I saw this movie on the shelf and thought “Hey I love Bruce Willis and the Die Hard movie collection, why not try this one?”  This is a great action thriller movie about an emergency room doctor (Bruce Willis) who is constantly fixing up the bad guys of Chicago. While he gets called into work, his family is targeted in his home and his wife and college bound daughter are brought to his ER with a grave prognosis. Suddenly he has this awakening moment that he needs to do something for revenge. The cops are clearly overwhelmed with cases and are coming up empty handed on his families case. He starts with lowly purse snatchers, and moves up to carjackers to murderers.

This was a great action movie for Bruce Willis. Not too much CGI and not an implausible storyline. It felt really honest and true to the types of mistakes one might make while learning to be an everyday incognito superhero. I am a little confused about the roll his brother plays in this film, but not enough to turn me away from watching it again.  I think this one hits home for the action lover of the family as well as the romance/story lover of the family.  An all around A+ in my book!

Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together by Erin Lowry

Book – The millennial generation is the largest living cohort in recent history. They are high in debt, low on jobs, and full of so-called ‘entitlement’. It’s no wonder millennials are so uncomfortable talking about money or the lack of it. Because my personal goal for this year is to set up and successfully fund an investing account, I have been reading a great deal of personal finance books. Erin Lowry’s book Broke Millennial: Stop Scraping By and Get Your Financial Life Together is by far the best I’ve read so far.

Erin Lowry’s book does a good job of helping readers identify and work around their money hang-ups and take control of their personal finance. Erin lays out her chapters in a DIY guide format that gives you the option to read only the sections that are applicable without making you feel like you skimmed half the book. The majority of the issues she presents will be pertinent to the millennial generation. She dedicates an entire chapter on how to cope with student loan debt— an inevitability today—without going mad. She presents solid money saving and budgeting techniques and doles out advice on how to enact a plan to rid yourself of debt. A strong point for this book is the easy to understand language. You definitely won’t feel like you are being talk down to and you’ll appreciate Erin’s humor as she shares her own financial woes.

This book will definitely resonate well with the 20-30 year old crowd who are confused about money and aren’t quite ready to admit they’re not doing so well in the finance department. It will also benefit those who are doing just fine (those with an existing budget and savings account) and are ready to do more with their hard-earned cash.

Jagannath by Karen Tidbeck

Book – A call center routes calls to the afterlife. A bereaved daughter writes to her recently deceased father about her missing mother. A girl puts on her great-grandmother’s wedding dress and disappears into the mountain. A society of symbiotes living and working inside their mother begins to crumble. Told in beautiful, spare prose, Jagannath is a remarkable collection of short stories from Swedish writer Karen Tidbeck.

Tidbeck translates her own work, and there’s a lovely essay in the back of the book about how the process of composition and translation differs between languages. But if you didn’t know these were translations, you’d never guess. The pictures these stories draw are so vivid, so crisp and clear, you feel you could walk right into them – even the strangest of stories, like those about the ever-increasing aunts who grow their successors inside their own hearts. If you’re only familiar with Nordic literature from the dark thrillers that have become so popular in recent years, give this collection a try.

A Study in Scarlet Women by Sherry Thomas

Book – What’s a young woman to do when she’s possessed by a singularly brilliant mind and a distinct disdain for social conventions? If the young woman in question is Charlotte Holmes, main character of Sherry Thomas’ A Study in Scarlet Women, the answer to that question is; deliberately be caught behaving scandalously to avoid being forced to marry, move in with former actress and well-to-do widow Mrs. Joanna Watson, and set up a private detective agency under the fake name “Sherlock Holmes.” After all, no one in Victorian London would come to a lady consulting detective.

A Study in Scarlet Women is both a character study and mystery novel. However, as a mystery, the pace moves fairly slowly at first. Readers should be aware that for the first third of the story the actual murder mystery takes a back seat to character development. But with characters like these, it’s worth waiting for the plot to pick up. Thomas does an excellent job exploring the many ways Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and John Watson would be very different characters if they’d been born and raised as middle class women in an extremely male dominated society, inured in all the strict social guidelines that women were expected to abide by. This extra care and consideration makes for three dimensional characters that practically leap off of the page. And when the mystery plot does take off, watch out. It becomes hard to put the book down as Thomas throws misdirections and surprise twists at the reader, concluding in a startling and highly enjoyable finish. Readers who enjoy Sherlock Holmes adaptations and books that focus on strong character development should definitely check out A Study in Scarlet Women, by Sherry Thomas.

Bad Boys (1995)

DVD – Made in 1995, Will Smith and Martin Lawrence make a comedic win of a movie. There has been a break in at the police station in the evidence locker and a ton of heroin has been stolen without a huge scene being made. They now have 72 hours to reclaim all that heroin before the FBI and CIA get involved. To complicate matters, they have to protect a witness (Julie) who happened to see the thieves murder her best friend while the drugs are exposed in the room. Her best friend always told her that if anything ever happened to her and she needed someone, Will Smiths character is THE ONLY person she trusts.  Julie calls the police station and says she knows what happened and will only talk to Will Smiths character.  He was off pursuing another lead, so Martin Lawrence picks up the phone and says he is Will. The two lead very different lives and its comical to see how they portray each other. Will they get the heroin back? At what cost to the city? Will they keep Julie alive? So many ways this one can play out.

This is a moderately older movie, but its a goodie. To see the stereotypes being played out by two comedians is hilarious. There is definitely a large amount of cursing and racial slurs, and intense action so I do not recommend this for children. This movie was such a hit, that they even made Bad Boys II in 2003.  Snuggle up for a fun adult night with this pair of movies!

 

The Girl from Rawblood by Catriona Ward

Book – The Villarcas are tied to Rawblood, their estate in the Devon countryside. If they stay away from it too long, they sicken and die. But if they stay home, they are tormented by her, a curse of the Villarca bloodline, the ghost of a tortured young woman who tortures the residents of Rawblood in turn. At the turn of the twentieth century, young Iris Villarca is determined to find a way out from under the curse. Decades earlier, her father does his best to push his lover away to keep them both safe. In Italy, Iris’s grandmother finds herself strangely drawn to – and repulsed by – a Spanish expatriate. In the end, the curse ties them all together.

The Girl from Rawblood is a classically Gothic novel with all the trimmings: a huge empty house, a ghost, a family curse, a series of mysterious and unread letters. (And, unfortunately, quite a lot of that peculiarly English racism against European foreigners.) Pulling the Gothic all the way into 1918 is a particularly nice touch: while I liked the history of the family, Iris’s story, wrapped up in World War I, was by far the most fascinating. If you like your ghost stories equal parts frightening and heartbreaking, this is the book for you.

30 Before 30: How I Made a Mess of My 20s, and You Can Too by Marina Shifrin

Book 30 Before 30: How I Made a Mess of my 20s, and You Can Too by Marina Shifrin is a fantastic read.  Marina details her journey attempting to and succeeding in achieving 30 goals before turning 30 years old. Some goals were bigger: “Getting a Dog”, “Visit Russia”, and “Live in a Different Country”, while others were easier to accomplish: “Eating a Meal Alone” and “Take a City Bus Tour.” For any millennial working through their mid 20s, or for any age seeking to create their own bucket list, this book is a fun beacon of light in all the stresses adulthood can bring.

I was so inspired by Marina’s list that I decided to create my own!  I will admit I stole some of her goals, specifically “Getting a Dog”, “Eating a Meal Alone”, but some of my other goals include: “Baking an Obscene amount of French Macarons” (Because why not?) and “Taking a Roadtrip Through the 6 States Most Abundant in Cacti” (and of course buying a ton of new houseplants along the way). Because of the format of the book, it was easy to browse for chapters that were most relatable to me, but I still found myself reading through each section. Marina’s humor is a great addition to this memoir, and I really enjoyed her writing style. Her parents emigrated from Russia and it was interesting to see how that heritage has influenced Marina in her life and partaking of the 30 before 30 project, especially in her goal to travel to Russia. An easy but fun read for anyone!